U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Which non-Confederate state is the most Southern?
Oklahoma 63 23.33%
Kentucky 163 60.37%
West Virginia 44 16.30%
Voters: 270. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-24-2013, 06:13 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,994,000 times
Reputation: 2967

Advertisements

...I've spent some time in Oklahoma and WVA, and these places are pretty Southern, too, IMO. Like KY and parts of Missouri I'd consider them part of the 'Upper South". Getting to western OK, the Cimmarron Strip, is like the Texas Pandhandle, so you are in the high plains cowboy country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-24-2013, 01:51 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,414 posts, read 7,719,806 times
Reputation: 3064
Tie between Oklahoma and Kentucky. They are both more Southern than anything else.

Oklahoma does have Western semblances combined with overt Southern culture. It's like a cooler version of Texas! (Chime in Texans!) The Southern sentimentality becomes quite strong and homogenous in the vast majority of Okie towns outside of OKC/Tulsa. Oklahoma is not part of the Midwest. Never has been and never will be. A fair and balanced assessment is that it is part Southern part Western-Southwestern (read SOUTHwestern = OK/TX, not SouthWESTERN = NM/AZ).

While Oklahoma is somewhat a mixture of Southwestern/Western semblances combined with strong Southern influence, Kentucky has a touch of Midwestern influence given its proximity to Ohio, a flagship Midwestern state.

On the whole though, both states are more Southern than anything else.

Oklahoma/Texas are the western-most boundary of the South in its entirety. Kentucky could certainly be considered the northern-most boundary of the South along with southern Virginia and southwest West Virginia.

***By the way, BChris, this is a great inquiry I don't think I've ever seen asked on City-Data. Well done my fellow OKCer!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2013, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,234,855 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
...I've spent some time in Oklahoma and WVA, and these places are pretty Southern, too, IMO. Like KY and parts of Missouri I'd consider them part of the 'Upper South". Getting to western OK, the Cimmarron Strip, is like the Texas Pandhandle, so you are in the high plains cowboy country.
Parts of Missouri is the key. Most of the state still leans more toward the Midwest, although southern-sounding accents (actually is the South Midland dialect) can be found as far north as the central portions of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois and much of Missouri and Kansas. South Midland, while it has several similarities to southern dialect, is most widely considered to be its own dialect and distinctly defines the Lower Midwest.

The Texas Panhandle, meanwhile, from my experience visiting Amarillo was still pretty southern.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2013, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,060,954 times
Reputation: 4482
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post

The Texas Panhandle, meanwhile, from my experience visiting Amarillo was still pretty southern.
From the times I've been through Amarillo, I thought it seemed more western than Southern consistent with much of the western half of Texas and the Southwest United States outside of the major cultural centers. While Southern and western culture shares some similarities (political conservatism, country music), they are two distinct cultures.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2013, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,455 posts, read 11,958,801 times
Reputation: 10566
Something to keep in mind about Missouri is the portion settled by southerners (or at least, southern slaveholders in the antebellum era) was not in the south, because the best land for growing plantation crops was in the north.



Thus, during the civil war, the sympathizers of the CSA mostly lived in the northern portions of the state (outside of Saint Louis) and the unionists lived in the South, particularly the Ozarks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-27-2013, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,234,855 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Something to keep in mind about Missouri is the portion settled by southerners (or at least, southern slaveholders in the antebellum era) was not in the south, because the best land for growing plantation crops was in the north.



Thus, during the civil war, the sympathizers of the CSA mostly lived in the northern portions of the state (outside of Saint Louis) and the unionists lived in the South, particularly the Ozarks.
THat is ancient history. Those parts of Missouri are no longer anything remotely like the south, at least the northern-half of the state and the central part. You might still hear southern-influenced speech patterns, but that is based on the South Midland dialect, which goes as far north as Central Illinois, Central Indiana, and Central Ohio. Other than that, the Little Dixie and border little dixie counties are decidedly Midwestern today.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-27-2013, 09:56 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,082 posts, read 2,905,304 times
Reputation: 1337
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Something to keep in mind about Missouri is the portion settled by southerners (or at least, southern slaveholders in the antebellum era) was not in the south, because the best land for growing plantation crops was in the north.



Thus, during the civil war, the sympathizers of the CSA mostly lived in the northern portions of the state (outside of Saint Louis) and the unionists lived in the South, particularly the Ozarks.
The bootheel is where the southern culture is today.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2013, 03:56 PM
 
Location: District of Columbia
737 posts, read 1,414,018 times
Reputation: 466
Spent many years in 2 (KY, WV) of the 3. Of the bunch my vote goes KY for sure, it does have a noticeable mid-western influence though. I cast my vote in the wrong slot.

Last edited by sandlapper; 01-28-2013 at 04:20 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-01-2013, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,234,855 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
Missouri is another border state. Of these, Delaware is the least Southern.
Grouping Missouri, Maryland, and Delaware with the three states listed on the thread opener in a modern standpoint is ridiculous. These states lean more Northern from a modern standpoint and this is certainly true of their major cities. Kansas City, St. Louis, Wilmington and Baltimore have nothing in common with Louisville, Charleston, Tulsa, or Oklahoma City.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-01-2013, 04:56 PM
 
17 posts, read 21,924 times
Reputation: 31
I'd say Kentucky.

A related question: which former Confederate state is the LEAST southern?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top