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Old 01-20-2013, 02:59 PM
 
21,234 posts, read 30,478,027 times
Reputation: 19705

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
How on Earth does Florida rank in the top 12 for public schools? I couldn't click on the link provided.

And btw, if you're going to give him/her crap for not being thorough with providing data to back up claims, you should at least be aware of your own shortcomings when you cherry pick the data you want to show for Florida. Like instead of pointing to crime dropping in one year, how about a state vs. state comparison with statistics and rankings instead? A 7% drop from last place to 2nd to last place, for example, wouldn't exactly be "achieving". As much as I'm sure Florida isn't as terrible as the other person made it out to be, I'm equally sure it isn't as bright as you make it out to be.
How on earth would Florida NOT rank in the Top 12 for public schools? Through tired stereotypes and misinformation received from elsewhere perhaps? The source is Education Week, which ranks every state each year through a report card of varying criteria ranging from graduation rates, college preparedness, standardized test results and grade level benchmarks. In terms of your data issues...I'm pointing to an article stating a 7% drop and 40 year low in crime rate. Is that not a significant milestone on it's own? I'm not comparing Florida to other states and neither was the person portraying it as something worse than it is.
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Old 01-20-2013, 03:01 PM
 
21,234 posts, read 30,478,027 times
Reputation: 19705
Quote:
Originally Posted by I'minformed2 View Post
Not to mention...I made it clear that this was MY perception and MY opinion based on the huge number of FL transplants met who moved to NC since the early/mid 2000s (enough for the term "halfbackers" to be coined) and from what I've seen on visits down to FL (mostly the Ocala and WPB areas). Not trying to say they are facts or necessarily apply to the whole state. I really do question the validity of the top 10 schools claim though.
Based upon your "well-honed" perception and opinion no doubt....
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Old 01-20-2013, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,447 posts, read 2,294,715 times
Reputation: 1361
I think North Carolina and Virginia will continue to be a hot spots for the foreseeable future. Both of those states have a milder climate than the northeast or the deep south, excellent university systems, great beaches, mountains, and growing cities (esp. NC on this last one). People in the northeast and deep south like that they are still driveable to their homes.

Tennessee offers some of those advantages to people from the mid-west (better climate, mountains, some nice cities), but it doesn't have the beach or the same quality educational system.
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Old 01-20-2013, 09:09 PM
 
5,265 posts, read 14,920,245 times
Reputation: 4239
Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
No way. While it is clear that North Carolina to Georgia are growing, I don't think there will ever be a significant migration to MD and Western PA. You are talking about a fringe effect at best.
exactly....hence why I said "creep it's way up".
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Old 01-20-2013, 09:19 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
2,311 posts, read 4,245,258 times
Reputation: 1430
I think the water thing is on the right track- no matter how much our technologies advance, for the foreseeable future cities will need water, and also energy. So I think cities that can build environmentally sustainable energy generation networks, and that have reliable access to water, will be those that prosper.
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Old 01-21-2013, 07:36 PM
 
Location: IN
20,871 posts, read 36,029,183 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefoxwarrior View Post
When I read your post, this article immediately came to mind:

Where You'll Want to Live in 2032

It predicts the west north central states (or western Midwest area - MN, Dakotas, MO, IA) as the highest ranked for livability in 2032 based on a number of factors. But, just because a place is livable doesn't necessarily mean people will flood the gates...and I really can't imagine people flocking to North Dakota, for example.
Unlikely. Liveable is likely not taking into account changing weather patterns and the potential for more frequent extreme drought episodes.
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Old 01-21-2013, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,335,763 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
How on earth would Florida NOT rank in the Top 12 for public schools? Through tired stereotypes and misinformation received from elsewhere perhaps? The source is Education Week, which ranks every state each year through a report card of varying criteria ranging from graduation rates, college preparedness, standardized test results and grade level benchmarks. In terms of your data issues...I'm pointing to an article stating a 7% drop and 40 year low in crime rate. Is that not a significant milestone on it's own? I'm not comparing Florida to other states and neither was the person portraying it as something worse than it is.
Florida has terrible schools and you should understand how that ranking is put together. I'm sorry if this hurts your feelings, but maybe it's time you were told the truth, because apparently you're being brainwashed.
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Old 01-21-2013, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,459 posts, read 21,304,257 times
Reputation: 24315
Quote:
Originally Posted by workaholics View Post
Immigration from Latin America will probably subside and be replaced by immigration from Asian countries. You can already see it happening now. In 2010, for the first time there were more new Asian immigrants than Hispanic ones.
The fertility rate in Mexico has plummeted to 2.0, on a par with the U.S., and it's falling all over Latin America and world. And we're looking at an increasingly top-heavy aging population. The day may come when Mexico will do the border enforcement, not allowing their people to leave as they'll be more needed there!

Bolivia is still the big baby maker down south, but we're not likely to see any of them come to the U.S. as they'll be needed in Brazil where the fertility rate has plunged to 1.9.
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Old 01-22-2013, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
10,234 posts, read 14,009,862 times
Reputation: 25890
I have heard speculations concerning "climate refugees". I agree only to a certain extent. If, for example, Tornado Alley continues to experience disasters then I'm sure that some people will consider relocation when they've had enough. In New Orleans I met a few (though only a few) natives who said that they would live somewhere else in the event of another Katrina.

But with jobs few and far between in the West Coast ~ and most of the nation, for that matter ~ I don't see this really happening.
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Old 01-23-2013, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,335,763 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluesmama View Post
I have heard speculations concerning "climate refugees". I agree only to a certain extent. If, for example, Tornado Alley continues to experience disasters then I'm sure that some people will consider relocation when they've had enough. In New Orleans I met a few (though only a few) natives who said that they would live somewhere else in the event of another Katrina.

But with jobs few and far between in the West Coast ~ and most of the nation, for that matter ~ I don't see this really happening.
Tornadoes are far too unpredictable and rarely kill (relative to other natural disasters) for people to be in widespread panic about them. They just seem scary! It would be like not living somewhere because of fear of lightning strikes (which are more deadly than tornadoes, btw). Floods, for instance, are MUCH deadlier, and it would make more sense to run from places that continually flood than places that are tornado-prone.

The #1 killer from nature: heat! (and people are flocking to hot places in droves!)
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