U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-21-2019, 09:05 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,550 posts, read 3,653,233 times
Reputation: 12306

Advertisements

In my experience, the Appalachians south of Maryland don't easily fit entirely into any stereotypical notion of the "South". That can be said of a half-dozen regions that are supposed to be of the "South" but have minor cultural aspects that sets them apart.

If we take history out of it and forget about the Civil War, Confederacy, Jim Crow, even slavery, we are left with cultural artifacts like language/dialect, food, ancestry, religious affiliation, crops, topography, and climate. That's where I see differences in some southern regions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-24-2019, 10:22 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
336 posts, read 105,605 times
Reputation: 325
Applicha is pretty much the extended Eastern Seaboard. Almost all of the east coast has connection to the applican mountains. I think the mason-dixon line is a good dividing factor for northern and southern applicha. It's probably better for the mountain area than the coastal section of the east coast due to less urbanization in the western edge of the east coast.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2019, 11:59 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,730,726 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwalker96 View Post
Applicha is pretty much the extended Eastern Seaboard. Almost all of the east coast has connection to the applican mountains. I think the mason-dixon line is a good dividing factor for northern and southern applicha. It's probably better for the mountain area than the coastal section of the east coast due to less urbanization in the western edge of the east coast.
True. I personally know a few Canadians who consider themselves tied to the very same mountain range.

I also agree that the Mason-Dixon is more effective in the mountains than on the coast, but I'd still debate some of it. Western Maryland and northern-most non-panhandle WV just aren't very southern even if you isolate Appalachia; they do have some distinct lower-Pennsylvanian vibes though.

Even a town like Fairmont, WV is much more "Pittsburghy" than "Charlestonesque".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2019, 10:13 AM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,932,344 times
Reputation: 13287
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
True. I personally know a few Canadians who consider themselves tied to the very same mountain range.

I also agree that the Mason-Dixon is more effective in the mountains than on the coast, but I'd still debate some of it. Western Maryland and northern-most non-panhandle WV just aren't very southern even if you isolate Appalachia; they do have some distinct lower-Pennsylvanian vibes though.

Even a town like Fairmont, WV is much more "Pittsburghy" than "Charlestonesque".
Garrett County, MD has the southernmost latitude fen bog (boreal) due to elevation of any area in the US. It is not southern in climate, definitely similar in climate to upstate NY or southern New England.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-26-2019, 06:48 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
336 posts, read 105,605 times
Reputation: 325
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
True. I personally know a few Canadians who consider themselves tied to the very same mountain range.

I also agree that the Mason-Dixon is more effective in the mountains than on the coast, but I'd still debate some of it. Western Maryland and northern-most non-panhandle WV just aren't very southern even if you isolate Appalachia; they do have some distinct lower-Pennsylvanian vibes though.

Even a town like Fairmont, WV is much more "Pittsburghy" than "Charlestonesque".
WV is like the perfect blend of northern and southern applican..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-26-2019, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,730,726 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwalker96 View Post
WV is like the perfect blend of northern and southern applican..
I would generally agree.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top