U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-31-2018, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,509 posts, read 7,454,824 times
Reputation: 10908

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobilee View Post
Here's a map from Wikipedia showing how southern Appalachia counties voted for or against secession in their various states.

It is well documented that the Appalachian counties voted against secession in Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama. However that does not make them northern and it also does not mean they did not fight for the confederate army once secession and war began. It just means they did not vote for secession. Here in East Tennessee many people just wanted nothing to do with the war and avoided the draft. Many did enlist in confederate forces. Of course like other confederate states Tennessee did have some people who felt the need to go north and fight for the union. One thing is absolutely true, white poor southern mountain people did dislike and resent the rich planter class and they tended not to care one way or another about slavery. It is a misnomer however that there was no slavery in the mountains, there were some slaves and plantations, just a smaller number of them. The civil war was complicated and highly damaging in southern Appalachia. It is said that for many years after the war people just did not want to talk about it or be reminded of it. I believe this is the reason you find less markers and monuments here to the war, northern or southern. People just wanted to forget about it.

Another thing worth noting is that southern Appalachia today is really one of the most religious and conservative parts of the south. It is highly white, highly conservative and traditional. Ironically the confederate flag and southern history is more respected here today than it is in many other parts of the south despite the low voter support for secession in 1861. In defiance of demands to remove confederate flags there were large pro confederate flag rallies here a few years ago. Many of the stereotypes about conservative southern life are more of a reality here than they may be in cities like Memphis or Birmingham.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-31-2018, 08:45 AM
 
1,593 posts, read 831,682 times
Reputation: 1216
Quote:
Originally Posted by England Dan View Post
The Scots Irish came originally from Northern Britain ( lowland Scots and North country English. Most resented being labled Irish as these new immigrants were staunchly Protestant .
The original English colonists , many from the Midlands and the West Country were in the Appalachian foothills way before the Ulster folk. All these lines would latterly merge. The Appalachian language is a mixture of early English Elizabethan ( ie yonder) and then old Scots and Yorkshire. Also doubtful of much Indian mingling in the mid 1700 and 1800, poss 1600

Ehh... I guess they shouldn't have invaded Ireland then before they moved to the US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2018, 12:07 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,550 posts, read 3,653,233 times
Reputation: 12306
Just one of many regional cultures of the southern US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2018, 05:21 PM
 
1,068 posts, read 735,605 times
Reputation: 1025
Totally agree General honey
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2018, 12:40 PM
 
Location: North Caroline
252 posts, read 128,079 times
Reputation: 368
Southern Appalachian culture, in states like Kentucky and West Virginia and below, is a subset of Southern culture. Above those states, you don't have the same culture with country and bluegrass music, moonshine, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2018, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,730,726 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by TarHeelTerritory View Post
Southern Appalachian culture, in states like Kentucky and West Virginia and below, is a subset of Southern culture. Above those states, you don't have the same culture with country and bluegrass music, moonshine, etc.
While northern Appalachia is different, what you just stated is a common misconception.

Country and Bluegrass music started in the south, and to this day is highly associated with it. In no way am I attempting to rob the south of that, but it must be said that Bluegrass bands from northern Appalachia and Bluegrass concerts in northern Appalachia do exist! Quite a lot more so than most would assume.

I would like to refer you to one of NY's best own Bluegrass bands, The Gibson Brothers.

The Gibson Brothers

As for Moonshiners (the old school illegal sort), that has existed in Ohio, Pennsylvania and upstate NY for just as long as it has in the south.

NYC did not have moonshine! In fact a famous story about Yankees from NY trying Moonshine for the first time took place in NYC. However, in the literal hundreds of miles of upstate NY Moonshining was practiced, and today its legal offspring are still (haha) around. When I was a kid my family knew two shiners right here in Schuyler county.

Sadly, the shine game has largely been replaced by meth labs.

Point being, Bluegrass and especially backwoods Moonshine have long been a factor in northern Appalachia as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2018, 05:09 PM
 
Location: North Caroline
252 posts, read 128,079 times
Reputation: 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
While northern Appalachia is different, what you just stated is a common misconception.

Country and Bluegrass music started in the south, and to this day is highly associated with it. In no way am I attempting to rob the south of that, but it must be said that Bluegrass bands from northern Appalachia and Bluegrass concerts in northern Appalachia do exist! Quite a lot more so than most would assume.

I would like to refer you to one of NY's best own Bluegrass bands, The Gibson Brothers.

The Gibson Brothers

As for Moonshiners (the old school illegal sort), that has existed in Ohio, Pennsylvania and upstate NY for just as long as it has in the south.

NYC did not have moonshine! In fact a famous story about Yankees from NY trying Moonshine for the first time took place in NYC. However, in the literal hundreds of miles of upstate NY Moonshining was practiced, and today its legal offspring are still (haha) around. When I was a kid my family knew two shiners right here in Schuyler county.

Sadly, the shine game has largely been replaced by meth labs.

Point being, Bluegrass and especially backwoods Moonshine have long been a factor in northern Appalachia as well.
Thanks for the information and correction-- and yes, it is quite sad that meth and opiates have taken over a large portion of this country, especially in Appalachia. In hindsight, I meant to say that many of these cultural markers are a much bigger presence and/or originated in the Southern Appalachian region, which is what distinguishes the region, to me at least, as a subset of Southern culture as a whole.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2018, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,730,726 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by TarHeelTerritory View Post
Thanks for the information and correction-- and yes, it is quite sad that meth and opiates have taken over a large portion of this country, especially in Appalachia. In hindsight, I meant to say that many of these cultural markers are a much bigger presence and/or originated in the Southern Appalachian region, which is what distinguishes the region, to me at least, as a subset of Southern culture as a whole.
Fair enough for sure!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2018, 09:49 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,987 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33050
As a Pennsylvania Appalachian (Beaver County), I agree with Cookie.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-25-2018, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Inland FL
1,248 posts, read 717,687 times
Reputation: 2179
KY, WV, TN and eastern NC are southern but not Deep South. So yes Appalachian culture is a subset of southern culture. You can include western Maryland too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top