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Old 04-28-2013, 01:53 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,513 posts, read 9,049,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Nah, I half disagree again. There are a lot of cities out there with very, very affordable suburbs. The ones that aren't so affordable are in suburbs such as NYC, Boston, DC, Los Angeles, San Francisco/San Jose. Go to Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Seattle, Portland, Chicago, Atlanta, Detroit, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh (pittsburgh city is already cheap as is), etc and they're absolutely affordable.
Most of those are rust belt cities with pretty harsh winters, that's why housing is cheaper there. The really desirable places to live where there is a population boom and lots of new construction going on is where it's going to be more expensive.
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Old 04-28-2013, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Milky Way Galaxy
669 posts, read 725,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OleSchoolFool View Post
yea, the only thing is that most of Indianapolis looks like the suburbs...while many other cities' burbs are way more urban and actually on the city scale, and it is not stupid to count metro areas cuz a lot of people live in the burbs but work in the city thus they are there often enough
It's far from a lot of people. Cities with a lot of suburbs has a lot of suburbs hours from the city. It's much easier for them to work somewhere nearby either in their own suburbs or other suburbs closer to them. Only people with sort of rare situations would have a job in the city but would still choose to live hours away in the suburbs.

And even if there were a lot its not like much people will be going around exploring the city after a tiring day at work.

Last edited by yyuusr; 04-28-2013 at 08:52 AM..
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Old 04-28-2013, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Milky Way Galaxy
669 posts, read 725,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
People in the suburbs commute to downtown. More people in the suburbs translates to a larger downtown.

Indianapolis has more people in the city limits than Seattle and Boston, which city looks and feels bigger? Easy question. Metropolitan population is the only real gauge of how large a city is.

Cities like Indianapolis have over 300 square miles of land area, and most of that population included your "suburbs". Cities like Boston and Seattle are less than 100 square miles and only slightly smaller in city population, which indicates they are FAR more densely populated. Capiche?
Define "translates." Occasional visit to an amusement park, ball game and things like that? Even tourists do that. How does that affect the city's daily life? People can hardly do that all the time. For most things in general they can do and get from the suburbs. I mean really do you think most suburbs are some country town in Wyoming in the middle of nowhere where there is nothing but farm animals, harvests and such? There are enough things in their suburbs or nearby suburbs to cover most of people's daily needs.
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Old 04-28-2013, 08:49 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,121 posts, read 23,642,005 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OleSchoolFool View Post
does philly offer adequate nightlife?
is the fact its pretty ghetto a big deal or almost all cities will have that, more or less?
It has a fairly varied nightlife and it's pretty good--it's about commensurate with the size of its metro area. The ghetto part is pretty concentrated in certain parts such as some neighborhoods of North Philly where you generally wouldn't be hanging around anyhow which is the same for all cities.
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Old 04-28-2013, 09:17 AM
 
2,665 posts, read 4,873,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
People in the suburbs commute to downtown. More people in the suburbs translates to a larger downtown.

Indianapolis has more people in the city limits than Seattle and Boston, which city looks and feels bigger? Easy question. Metropolitan population is the only real gauge of how large a city is.

Cities like Indianapolis have over 300 square miles of land area, and most of that population included your "suburbs". Cities like Boston and Seattle are less than 100 square miles and only slightly smaller in city population, which indicates they are FAR more densely populated. Capiche?
exactly, and thas y people outside the US havent even heard about cities like Indy, but they all know Seattle and Boston and such, i don kno how people can even debate this, in america suburbs and city cores are greatly connected and more people within the metros live in the burbs so u cant disregard them
millions of people commute to work to Manhattan from places like NJ, CT, Long Island, etc and they tremendously add to the economy of NYC and many people do go out there after work with their friends
same in many other cities im sure, at least the top tier ones
NYC has about 9 million now, but does this area feel like 9 million? No, it feels like much more cuz of the density in suburbs and the metro is like 20 million, 12 million people live in the burbs, huge difference from 8 so what we jus gon not count them? Same thing with other major metros
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Old 04-28-2013, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis
3,895 posts, read 4,568,116 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OleSchoolFool View Post
exactly, and thas y people outside the US havent even heard about cities like Indy, but they all know Seattle and Boston and such, i don kno how people can even debate this, in america suburbs and city cores are greatly connected and more people within the metros live in the burbs so u cant disregard them
millions of people commute to work to Manhattan from places like NJ, CT, Long Island, etc and they tremendously add to the economy of NYC and many people do go out there after work with their friends
same in many other cities im sure, at least the top tier ones
NYC has about 9 million now, but does this area feel like 9 million? No, it feels like much more cuz of the density in suburbs and the metro is like 20 million, 12 million people live in the burbs, huge difference from 8 so what we jus gon not count them? Same thing with other major metros
Actually people outside the US have heard of Indy.
the Indianapolis 500 is world renown and its one of the greatest racing events out there. Its part of the big 3 in World Racing.
Plus Britain has strong connections to Indianapolis because Rolls Royce's US headquarters is in Indy.
Roche Diagnostics which is another international company: US headquarters is in Indy.
So this notion that Indianapolis isn't known around the world is false.
You don't have to be a Chicago or New York or even an LA to be known around the world.
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Old 04-28-2013, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis
3,895 posts, read 4,568,116 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OleSchoolFool View Post
yea, the only thing is that most of Indianapolis looks like the suburbs...while many other cities' burbs are way more urban and actually on the city scale, and it is not stupid to count metro areas cuz a lot of people live in the burbs but work in the city thus they are there often enough
We also are forgetting *Old Indianapolis* which would be Center Township and north into Washington Township. These areas are not Suburbs and are a classic example of an intercity urban neighborhood.
Fall Creek Place is another area that comes to mind and its the classic example of modern urban revitalization with historic preservation.
The East side of Indianapolis is one of the most densely populated areas of the state outside of the university towns. over 5,000 people per square mile.
So this notion that Indy is just one giant suburb is not true and just because the city covers 360 Square miles doesn't mean that all the densities are the same.
Density varies from neighborhood to neighborhood in a city.
Staten Island in New York City VS Manhattan is a great example of this. Both are part of NYC but have major density differences.
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Old 04-28-2013, 09:34 AM
 
2,665 posts, read 4,873,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Broadrippleguy View Post
Actually people outside the US have heard of Indy.
the Indianapolis 500 is world renown and its one of the greatest racing events out there. Its part of the big 3 in World Racing.
Plus Britain has strong connections to Indianapolis because Rolls Royce's US headquarters is in Indy.
Roche Diagnostics which is another international company: US headquarters is in Indy.
So this notion that Indianapolis isn't known around the world is false.
You don't have to be a Chicago or New York or even an LA to be known around the world.
dude, not tryin to bash yo city or noth like that, but come on now, lets be real here
Im from abroad, and im tellin u nobod heard of it, shiiii, i eve kno some people who live in america who havent heard of it lol
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Old 04-28-2013, 09:39 AM
 
2,665 posts, read 4,873,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Broadrippleguy View Post
We also are forgetting *Old Indianapolis* which would be Center Township and north into Washington Township. These areas are not Suburbs and are a classic example of an intercity urban neighborhood.
Fall Creek Place is another area that comes to mind and its the classic example of modern urban revitalization with historic preservation.
The East side of Indianapolis is one of the most densely populated areas of the state outside of the university towns. over 5,000 people per square mile.
So this notion that Indy is just one giant suburb is not true and just because the city covers 360 Square miles doesn't mean that all the densities are the same.
Density varies from neighborhood to neighborhood in a city.
Staten Island in New York City VS Manhattan is a great example of this. Both are part of NYC but have major density differences.
Staten Island might look like a suburb coming from Manhattan, but comparing to any other cities, it has urban density in many nhoods, same as Northern NJ, most of which is not really suburban, comparing to other regions
any place that has multiple, big 5 story+ residential buildings is not a suburb by average American standards
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Old 04-28-2013, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,798 posts, read 19,006,770 times
Reputation: 6800
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Most of those are rust belt cities with pretty harsh winters, that's why housing is cheaper there. The really desirable places to live where there is a population boom and lots of new construction going on is where it's going to be more expensive.
I grew up in Minnesota where it was always a "construction boom" and while the real estate prices rose, the amount they rose was not that much.
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