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Old 01-29-2013, 06:58 PM
 
Location: IN
20,849 posts, read 35,952,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
I actually think northern Maine is the most remote, followed by the arrowhead of Minnesota, and then the the U.P. of Michigan.

But the U.P. is isolated in a unique way in that it is surrounded by water on three sides and only linked to the rest of Michigan by a bridge, and for that reason maybe it's more "out of the way" than the other two.
I'm going with northern Maine because roads are much fewer overall with more wilderness areas (only forest access roads).
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Old 01-29-2013, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Green Bay Area
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Default North woods can be anywhere you want it to be.

I grew up in the U.P., just moved down to the tropics of Wisconsin just a couple years ago. I still go back almost every weekend. I have spent a good amount of time in Maine and also Minnesota. I have to say that they are all so dang beautiful, all with their own specialities.

If you are looking for a trip, rather than just a destination; go up lower Michigan, west through the U.P., across a bit of Wisconsin touch a bit of Minnesota, go back down Wisconsin then back to cotton country, through the west side of Wisconsin.

I also believe that Ontario deserves a plug, lots of moose. If you want a real north woods experience, take a drive to Polar Bear Provincial Park. If you are still hungry, take a stroll out to Yellowknife. I honestly believe that these areas beat out all but maybe tie with Alaska in the US.

But, if you are looking to stay in the continental US. I would say come up lower Michigan, visit a few places along the lakes. Either side is nice. I would say that the west is more scenic, but I could be wrong on that.

Head out to Mackinac island. Sample, fight the urge, then most likely cave and buy a bit of fudge. It's absolutely great, we buy a ton every year and send it to relatives all over the country. Staying the night in St. Ignace is generally cheaper, btw. Stop by Glen's for a refill on your cooler, for some quick scenic bite to eat stops. I would say stick to US 2, westward until it goes inland. I love the views. Stop by the cut river bridge. Careful, so you don't miss it though. It's a quick stop to stretch your legs, well worth the five minutes stopped. Keep on US 2 until it goes inland.

From here I would say pull out your dusty trusty map. Woods are becoming more plentiful. Find a rural route to Grand Marais. On your way, maybe check out some of the lakes. I remember as a kid there were some glass bottom boats somewhere around there. Take a bit of a breather at one of the oldest places on the Great Lakes. This is the eastern start of pictured rocks. Grab some picnics anywhere along here.

Make your way to Marquette, the largest town in the U.P. Yes, largest. Laugh it up, we do! There are a hundred more places to stop in the UP, but if time is of the essence, start to head to Eagle River Wisconsin.


I just realized it's past midnight. I dont want to delete what I have, but have really just gave you one tiny sample of what Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota have to see.

Bottom line is though, really: From Minnesota to Maine, wherever you go to go to the "North Woods" you guys will be together and love the heck out of it. Watch the weather, bring your tent. If you have any questions on where in the UP or Wisconsin I would be happy to help.

If/when you see moose, just be a tad careful. Give them their distance. Beautiful as they are, they are not always super friendly. Not exactly rocky and bullwinckle. They are big: Mary’s Monday Metazoan: Mighty Moose – Pharyngula
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Old 01-30-2013, 03:44 AM
 
Location: Columbia, MD
1,429 posts, read 1,987,902 times
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Northern Canadian Provinces/Southern Territories of Canada. They would make anywhere in the US (including Alaska) look crowded.

Quote:
I also believe that Ontario deserves a plug, lots of moose. If you want a real north woods experience, take a drive to Polar Bear Provincial Park. If you are still hungry, take a stroll out to Yellowknife. I honestly believe that these areas beat out all but maybe tie with Alaska in the US.
Where there are polar bears, there will not be many (if any) trees. I've been to Yellowknife and the NWT is both Summer and Winter and I can assure you that you do not want to get lost in those woods. You will never be found/seen from ever again!
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Old 01-30-2013, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Green Bay Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by santafe400 View Post
Where there are polar bears, there will not be many (if any) trees.
Spot on. It was getting late. Scratch PBPP.

On my walk into work I was thinking about this again. What a perfect honeymoon idea! It all matters on how far you want to drive, how much you want to spend doing it and what else if anything you would want to see.

Like, Maine for example would have the coast, some awesome geological aspects to it. I was in the Brunswick area for some time, so can speak to that particular costal area. Plenty of lobster, and clams to dig. When we were working out there, we would go to a wharf to buy lobster for cheap as heck.

New York would of course have Buffalo and the Niagra falls on the way up. IMHO, after that New York starts to get a bit bland. But, YMMV. I have only been on the western side of upstate though. Around the Watertown/Fort Drum surrounding area. Nice hills though if memory serves.

Wisconsin has the Door county. Overrated to me, but again, YMMV. If you want cherries, head to Traverse City.

Minnesota has the Boundary waters. Wow. Amazing. Bring a canoe/kayak. If you don't have a water vessel, it is still good to see. Just not quite as serene is all. Like Maine and just about most of Lake Superior lake shore. It is just breathtaking to see the cliffs on the shore.

Time of year will also matter. On the hotter months, I would stick to the larger bodies of water. If it is cooler, say autumn - Go for the colors. Ontario has some just gorgeous hardwoods with overlooking hills/cliffs for views. Actually New York does too come to think of it. But, I think the same could be said for just about it all.


I am probably just adding confusion to the thread now. Traveling the midwest is a joy to me, so I apologize if I get a bit too excited.
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Old 01-30-2013, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,320 posts, read 21,890,925 times
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moose love to have their tummies rubbed!
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Old 01-30-2013, 07:01 PM
 
Location: MN
3,798 posts, read 8,169,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
I looked on the net and there are a number of different places that would qualify. The "Northern Forest" or sometimes called the "Great Northern Forest" stretches across the continent from Alaska, thru Canada and all the way to the Atlantic at the Canadian Maritimes. It dips down into some of the Northern states like Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine.


Here in the Northeast you have "The Northern Forest".

Here is a map http://www.northernforest.org/data/u...ocator_map.jpg (from Lake Ontario all the way to Maine)

There is a canoe trail that you can follow from the Adirondacks to the Maine-New Brunswick border. Northern Forest Canoe Trail - Home

The Algonguin to Adirondack conservation organization is working to better connect the Canadian forest in Ontario to the Northern forest in the Northeast. The idea here is to provide a huge greenbelt for the big Canadian cities; Montreal, Toronto and Ottawa (see map). But also possibly connect the Northern forests of Canada-Great Lakes-Northeast to the Southeast forests by using the Appalachians as a greenbelt.
A2A Region - Algonquin To Adirondacks Conservation Association

Um, yeah.

Or this

Great North Woods - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 02-09-2013, 05:43 PM
 
5,819 posts, read 5,184,429 times
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The moose are also disapearing from the North Woods of Minnesota. In the past 6 years the moose population has declined by 50%, according to a recent study by the MN DNR. They have initiated a study to figure out why there has been such a sharp decline, but are projecting that if the situation is not corrected, in 20 years there will be no more moose in northern MN. The state is considering putting moose on the endangered/protected species list. Since we're so close, I think probably (but don't know for sure) that the situation is the same in northern WI and the UP of MI.

It's still wonderful up here, but the environment is in significant change now. If you go into stores and resorts you'll still see products sold which romanticize the Northwoods of the past. But if the birch and moose are dying out, we wonder what it will be like up here in 20 years?

Again, better come up here to enjoy the Northwoods soon.
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