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Old 01-26-2013, 09:13 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ja1myn View Post
I learned to in HS when I moved to upstate NY. No one up there spoke like I did and they would all think I was faking some bizarre speech pattern. I am proud of who I am though and my accent is part of who I am. They can deal with it.

But when it comes to people in Atlanta and people in the South in general that I've encountered, they have a very difficult challenge trying to figure out what I'm saying when I'm speaking normally with my non-rhoticy or whatever it's called. I feel bad for them so I try to pronounce my r's when I remember.
Like Nairobi said, many blacks in the ATL have the non-rhotic accent. Also, do they ever have problems understanding say English people? As a non-rhotic speaker I never had problems being understood in the US.
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Old 01-27-2013, 11:22 AM
 
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I have no idea if it's rhotic/non-rhotic but the most common version of the Philly accent is more than alive and well.
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Old 01-27-2013, 11:38 AM
 
Location: New Hampshire
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The traditional white dialect of Philadelphia is rhotic.
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Old 01-27-2013, 12:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verseau View Post
The traditional white dialect of Philadelphia is rhotic.
Haha well the "traditional, white dialect of Philadelphia" is long gone and dead, ever since people moved en masse out of places like North Philly. The most common Philly accent is from either Irish or Italian-Americans mostly, depending on what particular area you're from. I got you though.
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Old 01-27-2013, 12:10 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
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Yeah, sorry, I didn't really mean "traditional" as much as I meant "native," i.e. the speech of people who have grown up in Philly.
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Old 01-27-2013, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Atlanta & NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
Where in town do you live?

The OP brought up a good point about non-rhotic speech being even more prevalent with blacks. Throughout the south, in Atlanta, and even over here in Houston, the "r" in words like here/there/hair/where/hard are practically nonexistent in the African American community.

Personally, my accent has developed into somewhat of a mix. Sometimes I pronounce my r's and sometimes I don't.
I live in Midtown but most of my life is spent in Buckhead because I work there (work might as well equal my life right now).

Yeah I understand that blacks in Atlanta speak non-rhotically, but isn't part of a non-rhotic accent pronouncing words like "bar" like "bah"? That's how I say it, but never really hear blacks say words like that.

The here/there/hair/where are definitely alive and well both in my speech and black people who I've met down here.
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Old 01-27-2013, 12:50 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,824,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ja1myn View Post
I live in Midtown but most of my life is spent in Buckhead because I work there (work might as well equal my life right now).

Yeah I understand that blacks in Atlanta speak non-rhotically, but isn't part of a non-rhotic accent pronouncing words like "bar" like "bah"? That's how I say it, but never really hear blacks say words like that.

The here/there/hair/where are definitely alive and well both in my speech and black people who I've met down here.
Well, non-rhotic just means that r's aren't pronounced, but it will sound different with someone up north versus a southerner, of course. Bar would sound more like "baw".
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Old 11-29-2013, 11:15 PM
 
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The non-rhotic accent was actually quite common in many areas of the South, such as in Charleston and Savannah; nevertheless, nowadays it has almost completely disappeared. The non-rhotic Tidewater accent is said to be the closest to the Shakespearean and Elizabethan accent. The fact that it is disappearing is truly a loss to the entire English speaking world. Curiously, England has experienced the very opposite of what North America has experienced in terms of accents. Most rhotic accents, which in the past were predominant throughout England with the exception of London, have been disappearing.
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Old 11-29-2013, 11:41 PM
 
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...not to mention the Boston Brahmin accent. That's almost completely disappeared together with an entire world of traditions and style.
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Old 11-30-2013, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ja1myn View Post
I live in Midtown but most of my life is spent in Buckhead because I work there (work might as well equal my life right now).

Yeah I understand that blacks in Atlanta speak non-rhotically, but isn't part of a non-rhotic accent pronouncing words like "bar" like "bah"? That's how I say it, but never really hear blacks say words like that.

The here/there/hair/where are definitely alive and well both in my speech and black people who I've met down here.
I've heard many African Americans throughout the rural south actually stressing the "r" in such words:

HER-rah (here)
THUR-ruh (there)
HUR-rah (hair)

This seems especially prevalent the closer one gets to Louisiana and east Texas. It's a really odd little twist to an accent, and by no means is it the "norm" but it's definitely out there. I never heard it when I lived in the southeast or mid Atlantic region.
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