U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Thread summary:

Wanting to move from suburban area to thriving downtown area, seeking opinions on others wanting to move from suburbs to downtown areas in large cities

 
 
Old 10-04-2006, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
26,087 posts, read 45,298,359 times
Reputation: 10959
Unhappy ANYONE Considering Moving From the 'Burbs to the City?!

Is it just me, or has EVERYONE on City-Data pretty much abandoned all hope for revitalizing our historic cities in favor of tearing down trees for new McMansion enclaves in the suburbs? I can't possibly be the only one considering relocating to an "in-town" environment within the next few years, can I?

Last edited by SteelCityRising; 10-04-2006 at 06:22 PM.. Reason: Typo
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-04-2006, 06:31 PM
 
Location: In exile, plotting my coup
2,407 posts, read 10,266,547 times
Reputation: 1652
You're not alone Scranton. In the coming months, I'm finally bidding a much-delayed adieu to the suburb that I loathe and heading to a place where there's high-density, actual human beings walking the streets, and where I can find dining beyond Applebees and Chili's, and stores within walking distance. I've lived in cities before and I miss it so incredibly much.

One reason many people steer clear of anything and everything urban on this board is the fact that this board treads older, and older people and/or those with families tend to prefer a suburban environment, whereas younger people such as yourself and I tend to find those environments bland and boring. To each their own.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2006, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
26,087 posts, read 45,298,359 times
Reputation: 10959
Smile Wonderful!

It's nice to hear that I'm not alone, and I wish you well on your "reverse-relocation" from the suburbs to the city! I likewise hope to be among the growing ranks of young professionals living in the city of Scranton by the year 2010 in one of the city's many new downtown mixed-use developments. While walking through the streets of the Electric City recently to snap some photos for a recent thread on the PA forum, I couldn't help but feel a strong connection between myself and my urban surroundings. I felt "at-home" among the various historical buildings of the downtown, and it was very enlightening to realize that I could live just a few blocks away from churches, restaurants, a shopping mall, two colleges, a cinema, a performing arts center, pharmacies, coffeehouses, etc.

It would be so refreshing to be able to wake up in the morning and leave my condo at Jefferson Pointe to head into the Northern Lights Espresso Bar on Spruce Street to grab a bagel and a coffee while skimming the Wall Street Journal. From there I could walk a few blocks to the train station, where I'd board a commuter train bound for NYC to my position at Pricewaterhouse. I'd come home and meet my significant other at one of the city's many lively downtown restaurants, pubs, and nightclubs before walking home together back to Jefferson Pointe and settling down for the night.

Scranton (and Wilkes-Barre) may both be small cities (populations of 75,000 and 43,000 respectively), but both offer just about anything an individual could ever want right at their doorsteps! It saddens me to see more trees coming down around my home for new "big-boxes" and tract housing at a time when local highways are also becoming among the most congested in the state outside of Philly and Pittsburgh (I-81 is now at more than twice its intended capacity and is expected to reach a daily traffic count in excess of 100,000 vehicles in the upcoming years!) I've had enough of this cul-de-sac hell; bring on "city life!"
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2006, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
26,087 posts, read 45,298,359 times
Reputation: 10959
Quote:
Originally Posted by dullnboring View Post

One reason many people steer clear of anything and everything urban on this board is the fact that this board treads older, and older people and/or those with families tend to prefer a suburban environment, whereas younger people such as yourself and I tend to find those environments bland and boring. To each their own.
Perhaps it's just because Scranton and Wilkes-Barre are smaller cities, but there are "suburban-ish" neighborhoods WITHIN the cities themselves! See my "NEPA Photo Tour: Part One" for just a sampling of the gorgeous "Upper Hill" neighborhood in Scranton, where tree-lined streets, inviting yards, and well-kept homes are the rule of thumb. Once I tire of condo living in Jefferson Pointe and am ready to raise a family, I aspire to relocate to a Victorian charmer in the Upper Hill, that my significant other and I will lovingly restore to be a perfect home for us and our future adopted children. I personally can't understand why locals are forking over $400,000 left and right for vinyl-sided, quickly-built, two-car garage-dominated, two-story tract housing on Scranton's periphery when you can pay much less for stained-glass windows, wrap-around porches, widows' walks, cupelas, hardwood flooring, pocket doors, natural woodwork, etc. in Scranton! (There's a beautiful Victorian home on eBay right now in the Upper Hill for just $159,000!)

I just can't understand why so many of those architectural treasures are sitting and rotting while people from NY/NJ continue to flood into the Scranton 'burbs, clogging suburban roadways and demanding more housing developments and strip malls. (i.e. "The Abingtons" ) Scranton's crime rate is very low, so one couldn't make the claim that the city isn't a good candidate for relocation based upon "personal safety." Perhaps the only downside to the city is the grueling 3.4% wage tax, among the highest in the nation, as the city tries desperately to raise additional revenue to offset a contiunal population loss to pay for municipal services. Other than that, anyone with an "avoid Scranton" mindset is just quite honestly relying on the hysteria and "chicken little" insight that has been spread throughout the NYC/NJ/PA region by those in the 'burbs who think Scranton is still where it was back in the year 1990! I, on the other hand, would love to trade in commuting 400 miles per week on congested arteries between college, home, and work to be able to WALK to most necessities!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2006, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Campbell, CA
63 posts, read 267,065 times
Reputation: 29
Default out of the city

Well on the other side of this topic, we live in one of the most expensive areas in the countries and the reason that we are moving out of the city is because in order to move from our current 1700 sq ft box to a 2200 sq ft box (to accomodate our family of 6), we would be looking at a *minimum* of $900k! That is for a 50 year old house on a 4500 sq ft lot. If you move out into the country that minimum only goes down to $750k. So yes, we are moving not only out of the city but out of the state.

Klpeake
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2006, 07:35 PM
 
886 posts, read 1,748,332 times
Reputation: 534
I think if you have kids, then you have different priorities. Urban renewal is being propelled by singles, and some courageous retired folks who want to be near more cultural amenities. Soccer fields, baseball diamonds, and clean, modern, convenient shopping are largely staples of the suburbs. Safety and security also come with the blandness and newness. To me, "historic downtown" means crumbling infrastructure and possible street crime issues, along with a large, and sometimes violently aggressive, homeless population.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2006, 05:04 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,313 posts, read 29,339,598 times
Reputation: 12609
Well said, Looking.
I spent the last couple decades in Denver, and it was exciting (if noisy and dusty) to observe the extensive redevelopment.
I would like to end up in a place with more cultural amenities than we have now. A historic district would be the icing on the cake.

OTOH
I enjoy living in a town where I don't lock my door.
Also, when taking care of errands like driver's license, etc., it's nice to know that I can take care of it in 3 minutes rather than 3 hours.

Scranton and Wilkesbarre sound like the size cities that I and my husband would enjoy. Right now we're in a rather nondescript town of 5,000! There is no movie theater, let alone concert hall. There is little healthcare.

Next fall we will be empty-nesters. We can't retire yet. We're going to keep renting awhile as we figure out where we'd like to be.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2006, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Galveston, Texas
169 posts, read 466,457 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by looking4home View Post
I think if you have kids, then you have different priorities.
I agree, nicely said. City life isn't that appealing with its high crime to those who have young children. That's where I am right now in my life but my husband and I have decided that after they've grown they can have our house and we're moving to a downtown loft.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2006, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
26,087 posts, read 45,298,359 times
Reputation: 10959
Smile Agree for Large Cities, But What About Small Ones?

Quote:
Originally Posted by txgrl View Post
I agree, nicely said. City life isn't that appealing with its high crime to those who have young children. That's where I am right now in my life but my husband and I have decided that after they've grown they can have our house and we're moving to a downtown loft.
I guess I can see your points of view as being credible as well. However, I'm not talking about moving to Chicago, L.A., or NYC; I'm mostly unhappy with how even our nation's smallest cities (Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, PA, Binghamton/Elmira, NY, etc.) are emptying out and becoming "donut holes" as EVERYONE heads to the suburbs, destroying our countryside needlessly. I'm not as familiar with the quality-of-life in Binghamton or Elmira, but I know that Scranton, for example, has many beautiful, very safe neighborhoods with historic homes that are sitting mostly-vacant, awaiting new owners. (Check out the "Upper Hill" neighborhood in my thread "Northeastern Pennsylvania Photo Tour: Part One" on the PA forum for more information). You could live on a tree-lined street in the Upper Hill and just be a few blocks
from the urban oasis called Nay Aug Park, with its massive swimming pool, water slides, hiking trails, gardens, small zoo, etc. All of this comes at a price far less than what people are currently paying for their McMansions in "The Abingtons", Scranton's version of Beverly Hills.

I can see your points being very valid and very true in major urban cities, where having a backyard and fresh air may do a child wonders. However, what's the excuse for small cities with park-like neighborhoods, such as Scranton?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2006, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Galveston, Texas
169 posts, read 466,457 times
Reputation: 65
Ah, I thought you meant inner city living.. like in downtown. I wouldn't have a clue as to why most people want to flee to newer suburbs as that sort of thing has never appealed to me. I live in the city just not downtown. I could be in a safer place I know, but there is a certain charm about being in a historical area flaws and all. It's sad more people don't see the beauty in our older city neighborhoods.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top