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View Poll Results: What's the most English part of North America?
Utah 5 5.00%
New England 35 35.00%
The South 11 11.00%
Newfoundland 23 23.00%
British Columbia 15 15.00%
Ontario 8 8.00%
Other 3 3.00%
Voters: 100. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-09-2013, 05:00 AM
 
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Considering these factors 1) ancestry, 2) architecture, and 3) preservation of English customs and dialect, which part of the US/Canada would you consider the most English?
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Old 04-09-2013, 05:49 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Probably Victoria in BC, Nova Scotia, Southern Maine and New Hampshire.
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Old 04-09-2013, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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I wish I could pick more than one. I'd say New England and Ontario equally.
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Old 04-09-2013, 02:31 PM
 
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By ancestry I'll say Utah before the South and northern New England in USA. The South is a large mixture of English, Scottish and Scotch-Irish so it's hard to tell.

In northern New England it's pretty tied with French ancestry.

Utah and surrounding counties in Idaho and Wyoming with a large Mormons presence have a high number of English people. I think it's been a century that Utah is the state with the highest percentage of English American. In the 1980 US Census, 54 % of the population of Utah were of English descent.
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Old 04-09-2013, 07:46 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Default What's the most English part of North America?

Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
Considering these factors 1) ancestry, 2) architecture, and 3) preservation of English customs and dialect, which part of the US/Canada would you consider the most English?
I voted for Newfoundland as the most pure and least contaminated () English culture.

But actually most of the choices are pretty good, for one reason or another.
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Old 04-09-2013, 08:43 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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The Outer Banks of North Carolina
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Old 04-09-2013, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Canada
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I went with Newfoundland. Ontario and New England were very English once (especially Ontario), but considering the big non-English populations that come part in parsel with big cities like Boston, Toronto, and Ottawa, Newfoundland only felt right. Also, both have such historically strong and influential French Canadian influences, while the Newfoundlanders essentially wiped out their French populations and assimilated what few remained.
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Old 04-10-2013, 07:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
I went with Newfoundland. Ontario and New England were very English once (especially Ontario), but considering the big non-English populations that come part in parsel with big cities like Boston, Toronto, and Ottawa, Newfoundland only felt right. Also, both have such historically strong and influential French Canadian influences, while the Newfoundlanders essentially wiped out their French populations and assimilated what few remained.
I voted Newfoundland too. I think they're the only North Americans who eat pease pudding. But, it's about 35-40% Irish too, so it's definitely not purely English.
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Old 04-10-2013, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
I went with Newfoundland. Ontario and New England were very English once (especially Ontario), but considering the big non-English populations that come part in parsel with big cities like Boston, Toronto, and Ottawa, Newfoundland only felt right. Also, both have such historically strong and influential French Canadian influences, while the Newfoundlanders essentially wiped out their French populations and assimilated what few remained.
I agree with you completely. Ontario used to be a lot more English but the province takes in a significant amount of Canada's immigrants so it has much more of a 'melting pot' and multicultural feel (especially in Toronto).
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Old 04-10-2013, 07:27 PM
 
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In terms of English ancestry: probably Newfoundland - probably the most homogeneous place in North America (St. John's has a lot of people of Irish Catholic ancestry but rural Newfoundland is almost all of English stock, even the Scots were few and far between!), then Utah. In terms of English immigrants, I'd go with B.C., which is sort of like the Canadian Australia. Particularly Victoria and Vancouver Island generally (Nanaimo BC had the highest number of British immigrants as a percentage of the population in the early 20th century and they continued to move there). I like to think of B.C. as Canada's Australia.

Santa Monica is also known for having a lot of British expats.

New England I think does have an "English" feel (it was almost entirely English in colonial times, the Scots and Scotch-Irish lived in Pennsylvania and the South and the Germans and Dutch in the Middle colonies) even though it's now quite multicultural, as does a lot of Ontario. Then again, so is...England!
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