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Old 04-17-2013, 01:37 AM
 
341 posts, read 400,913 times
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why would anyone live in the city limits of any city in America? In most cities the "nice" housing is small, older, "row house" type in some cities, and very expensive. Not only that but most of these "nice neighborhoods" in the city are surrounded by nothing but HOOD so it's like you're on a lonely island is it not? The hood housing is often way bigger, newer and nicer looking than the houses the upper middle class/rich people live in. The only housing you can get at a decent price in the city is in said hoods but obviously that's a terrible idea. Yeah it has a little more entertainment options I guess but most of the things people say you can do in the city you can do anywhere.

It's not just the city that's like this tho. Plenty of pretty small towns are like this as well just way less expensive but it'd still be a better idea to live outside the "city limits" in these places too.
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Old 04-17-2013, 04:31 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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My observation is that at different stages of your life, some types of places are more right for you than others. I've liked every location I have ever lived in but at this stage of my life (retirement) I wouldn't consider moving back to any of them because they would be a bad fit for me in retirement. My "urban phase" came in in my late teens, early twenties and then again right after I got divorced (at least for work). The things that were important to me then aren't the things important to me now.
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Old 04-17-2013, 05:10 AM
 
20,065 posts, read 27,925,076 times
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Interesting perspective that new housing is perceived to be nicer than older housing, as many find nice, historic homes in well kept up neighborhoods to be more attractive than new clone-like McMansion housing stacked side by side in treeless neighborhoods. Also for that matter your assertion that older homes are always surrounded by "hoods" shows your unfamiliarity with the topic since that certainly isn't the case in big cities, though perhaps 20 years ago before gentrification took place. People are (and have been) moving back to many of the big cities and transforming them into nice places to live for quite some time.
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Old 04-17-2013, 05:16 AM
 
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Many of us don't like the idea of how being completely sheltered from society can change us and make us provincial, insular, cut-off, ignorant of issues, etc.

And this is coming from someone who is into nature and outdoors more than anything. And wanting to live closer to national parks, state parks for recreation and nature study is, and would be the only reason to move to a rural area.

But, just to flee and runaway so, I never have to be exposed to problems? No thanks. Thats not the person I want to be. I'd rather find the compromise, of living in a safe and friendly area, yet still be aware of social problems.
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Old 04-17-2013, 05:25 AM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,272 posts, read 17,764,671 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travel-a-lot View Post
why would anyone live in the city limits of any city in America? In most cities the "nice" housing is small, older, "row house" type in some cities, and very expensive. Not only that but most of these "nice neighborhoods" in the city are surrounded by nothing but HOOD so it's like you're on a lonely island is it not?
Hmmm, no. That's only true of a couple of cities in America. Yes, to BUY a single family home in a dense urban environment can be expensive if you're in the nice neighborhoods with everything. To buy a condo in some US cities in the city is not in many cities. I have no idea what you're talking about. Nice neighborhoods being next to hoods? I don't know, that's only true in a few cities. In Chicago for example, the bad neighborhoods are a handful of miles away from the nice ones. I can only think of two neighborhoods (Hyde Park and Kenwood), where walking too far in the wrong direction for 20 minutes will make you end up in a shady/bad one.

There's tradeoffs people don't even realize. For example, my girlfriend lives not far from Wrigley Field in Chicago. Her place costs $750/month and right out her front door within 2 minutes walk are tons of shops, restaurants, public transit, parks, a lake, a golf course, etc. Now, you might be saying $750/month is expensive versus your small town/city. There are tradeoffs. In no way does my girlfriend need a car, nor does she own one. She sold it once she moved to this location.

So pretend your location is $350/month for rent. Well, you need a car most likely. So let's say that's a minimum of $50/month (of course this is semi low sometimes) for insurance and $180/month for a car lease/car loan (because you don't own). Then let's say you fill up $175/month in gas. That's $405/month for a car, so you're paying $755/month rent+car. My girlfriend might pay $100/month in public transit costs, so really $850/month for my girlfriend versus $755/month for you. My girlfriend lives in an area with far more **** to do than you and she only pays $95/month more for it. The food where she lives is just as cheap as where you are. How do I know this? Because I've lived in small midwestern towns/cities before and know the cost of living. Everyone thinks cities are expensive, and they can be. However, there's a diverse class structure in every city and people have to survive. If you don't provide cheap food, housing, etc options, then your city will cease to exist and this isn't true in just bad neighborhoods. It's all over. I can show you places even near my places in downtown Chicago where you could get a meal for under $8 total. I can show you places in half yuppie neighborhoods where the price of chicken is almost the same as in central Iowa.

Cities like Chicago, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Houston, etc are not that expensive to live in, in reality, when you calculate it out and if you make the right decision about where to live (i.e. not downtown Chicago in a luxury rental complex). If we are talking about NYC, then sure you have to go further out for it, but most of the other cities that are not NYC, San Francisco, DC, Boston, or Los Angeles are more affordable to live in than people think and not as dangerous as you're lead to believe in most areas.
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Old 04-17-2013, 06:32 AM
 
Location: NJ
12,284 posts, read 30,797,644 times
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When we retire we are moving to a "city" (compared to where I am now). I miss not having to drive 25 minutes to a live theatre, abundance of restaurants, and general "life". I like the hustle and bustle of an urban environment. Plus, I'm over taking care of my home - I want something smaller.
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Old 04-17-2013, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Illinois
37 posts, read 69,062 times
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travel-a-lot, where do u live ? I am curious.
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Old 04-17-2013, 10:56 AM
 
10,996 posts, read 21,433,577 times
Reputation: 10630
Quote:
Originally Posted by travel-a-lot View Post
why would anyone live in the city limits of any city in America? In most cities the "nice" housing is small, older, "row house" type in some cities, and very expensive. Not only that but most of these "nice neighborhoods" in the city are surrounded by nothing but HOOD so it's like you're on a lonely island is it not? The hood housing is often way bigger, newer and nicer looking than the houses the upper middle class/rich people live in. The only housing you can get at a decent price in the city is in said hoods but obviously that's a terrible idea. Yeah it has a little more entertainment options I guess but most of the things people say you can do in the city you can do anywhere.

It's not just the city that's like this tho. Plenty of pretty small towns are like this as well just way less expensive but it'd still be a better idea to live outside the "city limits" in these places too.
It sounds like you've never really spent much time in any large cities if that's how you think people are living. If you're not living in THE most expensive cities in the country then pound for pound it's basically just as easy to live there than other places, and you get a ton of perks living in the city as far as stuff to do. I don't own a car, don't have school debt and have a decent corporate job in a highrise downtown - which is why many young people move here. My cost of living lets me do about anything I want and there's nothing atypical about my situation in Chicago compared to most others I know. We live in nice 1-3 bedroom condos with decks and plent of outdoor space around the lakefront. I would die in the suburbs. I don't ever really think about crime. Most nice neighborhoods in cities are in certain general areas, surrounded by many other nice areas.

I've have to walk for about 90 minutes or travel many times to get to "the ghetto".
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Old 04-17-2013, 11:00 AM
 
Location: San Francisco
9,033 posts, read 8,306,407 times
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I enjoy running errands on foot.
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Old 04-17-2013, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,807 posts, read 9,726,742 times
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Why would anyone live anywhere beside somewhere urban and somewhere rural?

The suburbs represent the worst of both Worlds to me.
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