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Old 04-17-2013, 07:40 PM
 
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The census bureau is estimating that population growth in America's cities has picked up in the last couple of years. I don't believe them for a second.

Currently, they are saying that Atlanta's population grew by 3% by July 2011

That Chicago's population grew by .4% by July 2011

And that Philadelphia's population grew by 1.4% by July 2012

Considering how terribly off the census estimates were of cities population during the last decade and I can't believe they are even shooting out numbers.

Chicago is still Chicago. There is no reason to believe that the cities population free fall has come to an end. It is a difficult place to live in and that will continue to push people out.

Philadelphia. Philly recorded a LITTLE growth last decade, but that growth couldn't have picked up to .7% annually like the census bureau is showing. If their estimate is true then that means the actual city of Philadelphia is growing faster than the metro as a whole, and that just does not happen in America.

Atlanta is pretty much the same as Philly. the census is showing a 3% growth rate in the city when this metropolis of endless sprawl only had metro growth of 1.6%. Also important to remember that during all of last decade Atlanta's city population only grew .8%.

What do you all think? I am calling bs on these estimates. I in fact expect cities like Chicago to experience even more population loss this decade than last because large groups of minorities are becoming more affluent and are able to move out to the suburbs.
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Old 04-17-2013, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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I don't know. The hubbub is that urban living is becoming popular again among certain groups. Certainly not the majority, but maybe just enough to justify the uptick. I'm seeing lots of new construction and also renovations here in Philadelphia. My eyes tell me that the census bureau is probably correct.
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mancat100 View Post
I don't know. The hubbub is that urban living is becoming popular again among certain groups. Certainly not the majority, but maybe just enough to justify the uptick. I'm seeing lots of new construction and also renovations here in Philadelphia. My eyes tell me that the census bureau is probably correct.
I think it is all just hubbub. The media takes pictures of young people right out of college moving into urban areas and paint it as an urban renaissance. It totally ignores the families fleeing the cities for the burbs in mass.

I think urbanism may be having a little bit of a resurgence, but not the hyper urban stuff. When I visit friends who live in the Lakeview area of Chicago I thank god I am just visiting. They have to move their cars every morning to dodge parking tickets because no place has parking for residents!

I currently live in the most densely population neighborhood of Tampa (Hyde Park). This type of urban is great imo. There are lots of tightly packed houses and apartments all around the area. There is an endless supply of restaurants, bars, and cultural activities to dive into all within a walking distance. And the best thing about it is that there is plenty of parking! And there is none of that nonsense living with three roommates in a shoebox. Who in the world would want to live like that???

I am hoping to relocate to Philly soon. I really like that city (I have been twice) I have applied for at least 10 jobs this week in the area. I would want to live in an urban area with lots to do within walking distance. I would NEED a place to park my car though. I wonder if I will find it in the city of Philadelphia.
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,449 posts, read 7,517,195 times
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Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
I think it is all just hubbub. The media takes pictures of young people right out of college moving into urban areas and paint it as an urban renaissance. It totally ignores the families fleeing the cities for the burbs in mass.
Is there some media hype about the resurgence of cities? There may be some exaggerations, and I agree with you that the Census Bureau isn't always a model for accuracy--but I think many cities, particularly ones with historically strong urban cores and decent job prospects are doing better than they have in decades.

Of course, people will continue to leave cities, particularly for traditionally better schools in suburban areas, but there is consistent evidence that our cities are once again being considered as huge assets and great places to live, work and play.

Massive urban renaissances won't happen overnight, but it's definitely progressing. It's also effecting basically every major city on some level.

Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
I am hoping to relocate to Philly soon. I really like that city (I have been twice) I have applied for at least 10 jobs this week in the area. I would want to live in an urban area with lots to do within walking distance. I would NEED a place to park my car though. I wonder if I will find it in the city of Philadelphia.
Good luck to you! If you're looking for a (relatively) affordable vibrant urban lifestyle in a very walkable environment, it's hard to beat Philly. In terms of parking, spaces won't necessarily come cheap or easy, but you could always rely on car-sharing if need be.

Last edited by Duderino; 04-17-2013 at 09:38 PM..
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Is there some media hype about the resurgence of cities? There may be some exaggerations, and I agree with you that the Census Bureau isn't always a model for accuracy--but I think many cities, particularly ones with historically strong urban cores and decent job prospects are doing better than they have in decades.

Of course, people will continue to leave cities, particularly for traditionally better schools in suburban areas, but there is consistent evidence that our cities are once again being considered as huge assets and great places to live, work and play.

Massive urban renaissances won't happen overnight, but it's definitely happening and is positively effecting basically every major city on some level.



Good luck to you. If you're looking for a (relatively) affordable vibrant urban lifestyle in a very walkable environment, it's hard to beat Philly. In terms of parking, spaces won't come cheap or easy, but you could always give up the car and rely on public transit, and car-sharing if need be.
Looks like an inner sub for me then. I could never give up my car. lol.

I think if cities truly want to revitalize themselves they HAVE to become more car friendly. Americans will never want to rely on public transit to get around. It is good to have if you need it in a jiffy, but public transit will never grant the leisure and ease that having a car does.
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,449 posts, read 7,517,195 times
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Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
Looks like an inner sub for me then. I could never give up my car. lol.

I think if cities truly want to revitalize themselves they HAVE to become more car friendly. Americans will never want to rely on public transit to get around. It is good to have if you need it in a jiffy, but public transit will never grant the leisure and ease that having a car does.
I think that's a very American concept though. Most other Western cultures rely much less on cars. Unfortunately, we've built so much of our country to be forced to rely on cars, but that's a whole other discussion.

I think the point is that it's nice to have the option to use public transit or walk when it exists. Of course, public transit might not always be practical or seem convenient, but when you can avoid terrible traffic, ridiculous gas prices (along with potential parking fees), and the stress of driving in a crowded area, having other options is very appealing.
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Old 04-17-2013, 10:11 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,119 posts, read 23,634,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
The census bureau is estimating that population growth in America's cities has picked up in the last couple of years. I don't believe them for a second.

Currently, they are saying that Atlanta's population grew by 3% by July 2011

That Chicago's population grew by .4% by July 2011

And that Philadelphia's population grew by 1.4% by July 2012

Considering how terribly off the census estimates were of cities population during the last decade and I can't believe they are even shooting out numbers.

Chicago is still Chicago. There is no reason to believe that the cities population free fall has come to an end. It is a difficult place to live in and that will continue to push people out.

Philadelphia. Philly recorded a LITTLE growth last decade, but that growth couldn't have picked up to .7% annually like the census bureau is showing. If their estimate is true then that means the actual city of Philadelphia is growing faster than the metro as a whole, and that just does not happen in America.

Atlanta is pretty much the same as Philly. the census is showing a 3% growth rate in the city when this metropolis of endless sprawl only had metro growth of 1.6%. Also important to remember that during all of last decade Atlanta's city population only grew .8%.

What do you all think? I am calling bs on these estimates. I in fact expect cities like Chicago to experience even more population loss this decade than last because large groups of minorities are becoming more affluent and are able to move out to the suburbs.
Do you live in the city or the suburb?

I've been in NYC for a good long while now, visit LA (the city part of LA pretty often) and Philly both several times a year and the change in these three cities in terms of population growth and just general number of shops and people on the streets is really visible and apparent. I don't generally just stick to one neighborhood either, so I don't think it's really just small splotches here or there in these three cities. I don't have a particularly hard time believing that things are changing.
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Old 04-17-2013, 10:13 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,119 posts, read 23,634,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
Looks like an inner sub for me then. I could never give up my car. lol.

I think if cities truly want to revitalize themselves they HAVE to become more car friendly. Americans will never want to rely on public transit to get around. It is good to have if you need it in a jiffy, but public transit will never grant the leisure and ease that having a car does.
America's really had the kind of mass car ownership above all else in the second half of the 20th century, so it's weird to compare that with the long trail of history before that and say that it has to be a automobile-oriented--or at least automobile-oriented in the way we have it now with private car ownership and often more than one car per household. Self-driving taxi cars on demand I can see though.
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Old 04-17-2013, 10:37 PM
 
5,368 posts, read 5,149,123 times
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Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Do you live in the city or the suburb?

I've been in NYC for a good long while now, visit LA (the city part of LA pretty often) and Philly both several times a year and the change in these three cities in terms of population growth and just general number of shops and people on the streets is really visible and apparent. I don't generally just stick to one neighborhood either, so I don't think it's really just small splotches here or there in these three cities. I don't have a particularly hard time believing that things are changing.
I currently live in a city. I live in Tampa's most urban neighborhood. It isn't even close to as urban as some areas up north, but there is quite a lot of population density here. Countless bars, restaurants, things to do in walking distance, etc.

I think the exodus is mostly happening in the poorer areas of cities. The areas that are not visited by travelers and tourists. Didn't the census say that all of Chicago's population loss occurred in the south and West sides for instance?
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Old 04-17-2013, 10:46 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,119 posts, read 23,634,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
I currently live in a city. I live in Tampa's most urban neighborhood. It isn't even close to as urban as some areas up north, but there is quite a lot of population density here. Countless bars, restaurants, things to do in walking distance, etc.

I think the exodus is mostly happening in the poorer areas of cities. The areas that are not visited by travelers and tourists. Didn't the census say that all of Chicago's population loss occurred in the south and West sides for instance?
Yes, it was mostly on the south and west, meanwhile the north just keeps getting more people. It could be a combination of the loss being stemmed for parts of the south and west side enough for the growth on the north side to offset for a net gain. I'm still not sure what seems so incredible about cities now posting net gains though especially if you're also seeing a bustling urban neighborhood where you are.
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