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View Poll Results: Are Pittsburgh, Erie, and Buffalo Northeastern or Midwestern?
Northeastern 42 50.60%
Midwestern 10 12.05%
Mixed 31 37.35%
Voters: 83. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-10-2013, 01:33 PM
 
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Pittsburgh should not be in the group. The lake cities (cleveland-erie-buffalo etc.) have more similarities with each other than with the cities below them. Also the Boston-Washington corridor is a very unique slice of east coast and is not the whole of the North East.

Philly and Pittsburgh are culturally worlds apart. So are Erie and Pittsburgh. Distance is not the only deciding factor.

Good topic
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Old 12-10-2013, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,517,724 times
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This is based on sports team allegiances, the soda vs. pop debate, architecture, and immigration trends. But, I feel that:

Syracuse and everything east of it is East Coast. Though, Syracuse still has the Midwest accent and there are some Bills fans around.

Buffalo and everything west of it is Midwest. Buffalo and the Southside of Chicago seem interchangeable to me. Mostly in terms of people, attitude, and architecture.

Rochester is mixed.
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Old 12-11-2013, 06:37 AM
 
Location: Currently living in Reddit
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Current resident of Pittsburgh. Formerly lived in Boston, NYC, DC and Philly.

There is NOTHING "midwestern" about Pittsburgh. The city itself and inner 'burbs are culturally more like metro Boston than any midwestern city. The exburbs are farther out are basically West Virginia - an amalgamation of Appalachia/South Central US.

Compact downtown, distinct neighborhoods with distinct class differences often defined by geography/terrain. Large college population. Significant cultural amenities belying its size. Historically democratic voting in city/inner burbs. Large Irish population. As Pittsburgh's history has far more to do with mining and manufacturing than it does with agriculture, even historically it's closer culturally and attitudinally to Boston than to Indianapolis, Cincinnati, or Des Moines. The main similarity to Chicago would be the large number of Eastern European immigrants in addition to Irish, but beyond that there are few similarities.

That said, once you're south, west or east of Pittsburgh (and still in PA), you'll find an alarming number of pickups with confederate battle flag stickers. There's a reason the state is known as "Pennsyltucky" and why politicians say it's "Philly, Pittsburgh and Alabama in between".
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Old 04-04-2014, 03:00 PM
 
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Pittsburgh's more midwest than northeast. Buffalo is on the fringe but definetly not northeast. I think anything east of Syracuse is definetly northeast. Heading south anything east of cumberland maryland is northeast. Anything north of Richmond is the north(and northeast), anything north of clarksburg wv is the north, anything in ohio or very northern kentucky is the north
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Old 04-04-2014, 03:14 PM
 
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? They are all Northeastern, but just not in the Bos-Wash corridor way.
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Old 04-04-2014, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,090 posts, read 1,630,581 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
? They are all Northeastern, but just not in the Bos-Wash corridor way.
I think people are conflating "Northeast" with "East Coast", just like many assume "Midwest" automatically means "Great Plains" or "Great Lakes" depending on what your frame of reference is. With that said, the only cities remotely similar to Pittsburgh in the Midwest are Cincinnati and St. Louis, and that has to do more with them being old ass river cities. People often compare Pittsburgh and Cleveland, but I just don't see it. Pittsburgh has its own unique, quirky culture but its definitely a Northeastern city.
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Old 04-05-2014, 06:44 AM
 
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Pittsburgh is NOT Midwest. Its Northeast, most are now using the term "Interior NE" to create a distinction from the Coastal Cities, whatever.

Most people who just lump the Burgh in with Midwest are people that:

A) Never been to Pittsburgh

B) Never been to the Midwest

C) Grossly and Arrogantly over marginalize the Northeast as being the Bos-Wash Corridor and nothing else
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Old 04-05-2014, 06:54 AM
 
Location: The City
22,341 posts, read 32,203,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sskink View Post
Current resident of Pittsburgh. Formerly lived in Boston, NYC, DC and Philly.

There is NOTHING "midwestern" about Pittsburgh. The city itself and inner 'burbs are culturally more like metro Boston than any midwestern city. The exburbs are farther out are basically West Virginia - an amalgamation of Appalachia/South Central US.

Compact downtown, distinct neighborhoods with distinct class differences often defined by geography/terrain. Large college population. Significant cultural amenities belying its size. Historically democratic voting in city/inner burbs. Large Irish population. As Pittsburgh's history has far more to do with mining and manufacturing than it does with agriculture, even historically it's closer culturally and attitudinally to Boston than to Indianapolis, Cincinnati, or Des Moines. The main similarity to Chicago would be the large number of Eastern European immigrants in addition to Irish, but beyond that there are few similarities.

That said, once you're south, west or east of Pittsburgh (and still in PA), you'll find an alarming number of pickups with confederate battle flag stickers. There's a reason the state is known as "Pennsyltucky" and why politicians say it's "Philly, Pittsburgh and Alabama in between".
Pittsburgh to me is an interesting one.

To me it feels sort of a nexxus city

One could argue its the largest city in Appalachia, its Northeastern, and sort of a cusp transition to the Midwest. It has at least some elements of all - hard one to purely pin down to me - sort of makes unique really in many ways and not a bad thing.

I grew up on the other side of PA and it always felt little different to me crossing the mountains etc, Elements of the Northeast no doubt and some other influences too.

The difference is more to the main NE corridor which is to many the image of the northeast yet the Northeast has so many other aspects.

Pittsburgh is a Northeast city with influences of other regions - maybe more Appalachia than Midwest on the whole

I think its position and Nexxus of sorts makes it rather interesting TBH
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Old 04-05-2014, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Paris
1,709 posts, read 2,053,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sskink View Post
Current resident of Pittsburgh. Formerly lived in Boston, NYC, DC and Philly.

There is NOTHING "midwestern" about Pittsburgh. The city itself and inner 'burbs are culturally more like metro Boston than any midwestern city. The exburbs are farther out are basically West Virginia - an amalgamation of Appalachia/South Central US.

Compact downtown, distinct neighborhoods with distinct class differences often defined by geography/terrain. Large college population. Significant cultural amenities belying its size. Historically democratic voting in city/inner burbs. Large Irish population. As Pittsburgh's history has far more to do with mining and manufacturing than it does with agriculture, even historically it's closer culturally and attitudinally to Boston than to Indianapolis, Cincinnati, or Des Moines. The main similarity to Chicago would be the large number of Eastern European immigrants in addition to Irish, but beyond that there are few similarities.

That said, once you're south, west or east of Pittsburgh (and still in PA), you'll find an alarming number of pickups with confederate battle flag stickers. There's a reason the state is known as "Pennsyltucky" and why politicians say it's "Philly, Pittsburgh and Alabama in between".
While I consider Pittsburgh to be a part of the NE, I do really question your understanding of the Midwest... (If you intended this paragraph to stand as your argument for why it is not Midwestern)
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Old 04-05-2014, 05:16 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,034 posts, read 102,707,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sskink View Post
Current resident of Pittsburgh. Formerly lived in Boston, NYC, DC and Philly.

There is NOTHING "midwestern" about Pittsburgh. The city itself and inner 'burbs are culturally more like metro Boston than any midwestern city. The exburbs are farther out are basically West Virginia - an amalgamation of Appalachia/South Central US.

Compact downtown, distinct neighborhoods with distinct class differences often defined by geography/terrain. Large college population. Significant cultural amenities belying its size. Historically democratic voting in city/inner burbs. Large Irish population. As Pittsburgh's history has far more to do with mining and manufacturing than it does with agriculture, even historically it's closer culturally and attitudinally to Boston than to Indianapolis, Cincinnati, or Des Moines. The main similarity to Chicago would be the large number of Eastern European immigrants in addition to Irish, but beyond that there are few similarities.

That said, once you're south, west or east of Pittsburgh (and still in PA), you'll find an alarming number of pickups with confederate battle flag stickers. There's a reason the state is known as "Pennsyltucky" and why politicians say it's "Philly, Pittsburgh and Alabama in between".
I grew up in Pittsburgh, actually, the far western suburbs. I agree with all but that last sentence. Yeah, I even agree with the confederate flag bumper stickers, and they're not just found on pickup trucks, either. But "Pennsyltucky" is an old, old term.
Pennsyltucky - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (See history)

Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Pittsburgh to me is an interesting one.

To me it feels sort of a nexxus city

One could argue its the largest city in Appalachia, its Northeastern, and sort of a cusp transition to the Midwest. It has at least some elements of all - hard one to purely pin down to me - sort of makes unique really in many ways and not a bad thing.

I grew up on the other side of PA and it always felt little different to me crossing the mountains etc, Elements of the Northeast no doubt and some other influences too.

The difference is more to the main NE corridor which is to many the image of the northeast yet the Northeast has so many other aspects.

Pittsburgh is a Northeast city with influences of other regions - maybe more Appalachia than Midwest on the whole

I think its position and Nexxus of sorts makes it rather interesting TBH
Oh, that's all be argued, at times ad nauseum on these forums, particularly the Pittsburgh forum. Pittsburgh is the northeast. If you think it's true Appalachia, you haven't been to Appalachia.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caesarstl View Post
While I consider Pittsburgh to be a part of the NE, I do really question your understanding of the Midwest... (If you intended this paragraph to stand as your argument for why it is not Midwestern)
As I interpret it, I think the poster was saying why Pittsburgh IS the NE, not why it is NOT something else.
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