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View Poll Results: Are Pittsburgh, Erie, and Buffalo Northeastern or Midwestern?
Northeastern 42 50.60%
Midwestern 10 12.05%
Mixed 31 37.35%
Voters: 83. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-20-2016, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,426 posts, read 11,933,106 times
Reputation: 10539

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I think there's a strong aversion among Pittsburgh forumers to the Midwest. Or at least with Cleveland. And I say that because there's a greater willingness to pair Pittsburgh with Washington, DC, which has all the same glaring differences from Pittsburgh, if not more, as Cleveland does. If Cleveland had a better reputation, then I suppose there wouldn't be as herculean an effort among Pittsburgh posters to distance themselves from that city.
In my experience, it doesn't cut too differently offline either. The only people I ever hear argue that Pittsburgh is in the Midwest are transplants from the East Coast who have only been here a year or two. Even the most dyed-in-the-wool yinzer types (who you would presume would have the least East Coast traits) hate being called part of the Midwest.

Now, if you want a real local discussion, it's around whether or not Pittsburgh is an Appalachian city.
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Old 01-20-2016, 03:23 PM
 
9,383 posts, read 9,546,239 times
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They are Midwestern. They are part of the "old west" or a post-colonial America.
Basically anything west of the proclamation line of 1763 (basically the eastern continental divide) is Midwestern the cities and towns popped up during westward expansion in the early 1800s, which is 150-180 years after the North East (Boston, Springfield, Hartford, NYC etc) was settled. Also heavier industries (steel, automobiles) were out near Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Erie, as opposed to paper and textiles popular in the east.
There is a sharp contrast in social and economic heritage once you go west of the Apps.
For example, Rochester NY was incorporated in 1817, Springfield, MA became a town in 1636. That is 179 years, so Springfield has been around for almost as much time before Rochester was incorporated as it was after. That's a huge difference.

Last edited by btownboss4; 01-20-2016 at 03:41 PM..
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Old 01-20-2016, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,252,873 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
They are Midwestern. They are part of the "old west" or a post-colonial America.
Basically anything South/East of the proclamation line of 1763 (basically the eastern continental divide) is Midwestern the cities and towns popped up during westward expansion in the early 1800s, which is 150-180 years after the North East (Boston, Springfield, Hartford, NYC etc) was settled. Also heavier industries (steel, automobiles) were out near Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Erie, as opposed to paper and textiles popular in the east.
There is a sharp contrast in social and economic heritage once you go west of the Apps.
For example, Rochester NY was incorporated in 1817, Springfield, MA was became a town in 1636. That is 179 years, so Springfield has been around for almost as much time before Rochester was incorporated as it was after. That's a huge difference.
I think you mean anything west of the Proclamation Line of 1763. Also, Pittsburgh was founded in 1758, which was obviously prior to 1763.

You raise an interesting point nonetheless.
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Old 01-20-2016, 03:46 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,223 posts, read 17,966,293 times
Reputation: 14668
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
From FiveThirtyEight.
Yeah, because some pundit from FiveThirtyEight knows more about Pittsburgh than the people who ****ing live there.

If he's so spot-on, then how did this guy ever become the mayor of Pittsburgh?



And how did this guy ever become the Chief Executive of Allegheny County?



Only one quarter of Allegheny County's population lives in the city of Pittsburgh, so suburban support is necessary to become the Chief Executive. Rich Fitzgerald defeated D. Raja for the position in 2011 by a margin of 24 points, so even if every single voter in the city of Pittsburgh voted for Fitzgerald, there'd still have to be about a 50/50 split in the remainder of Allegheny County for him to win. But since it's not realistic to assume that every single voter in the city voted for Fitzgerald, he would have needed at least a slim majority in the remainder of Allegheny County to win by the margin he did. In fact, that Chief Executive election in 2011 belies the notion of Pittsburgh/Allegheny County being socially conservative, considering one candidate was pro-choice, pro-gay marriage, pro-public transit and anti-fracking, and the other was an entrepreneur from India.

Quite frankly, I find it hilarious that Mr. FiveThirtyEight blathered on about how conservative the "suburbs" (exurbs) are in all the outlying metropolitan counties while completely ignoring all the actual suburbs within Allegheny County. First of all, Allegheny County has more people than Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Fayette, Washington and Westmoreland Counties combined. Second of all, three quarters of Allegheny County's population lives outside the city of Pittsburgh. In fact, if you subtract Pittsburgh's (2010) population from Allegheny County's, you get 917,645. Way to overlook almost 1,000,000 people, Mr. Pundit.

Here's the truth: Despite Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Fayette, Washington and Westmoreland Counties all being "red" and trending "redder," Pittsburgh is "blue"; the remainder of Allegheny County is "purple," and they're both trending "bluer." And now that the population of Allegheny County is increasing while the populations of Armstrong, Beaver, Fayette and Westmoreland Counties continue to decrease, don't be surprised if the Pittsburgh metropolitan area becomes "light blue" in the future despite the "red" shift in the outer metropolitan counties. In fact, that could happen sooner than we think, as the mass die-off of the disproportionately large, socially conservative elderly population in the metropolitan area continues unabated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
They are Midwestern. They are part of the "old west" or a post-colonial America.
Basically anything west of the proclamation line of 1763 (basically the eastern continental divide) is Midwestern the cities and towns popped up during westward expansion in the early 1800s, which is 150-180 years after the North East (Boston, Springfield, Hartford, NYC etc) was settled. Also heavier industries (steel, automobiles) were out near Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Erie, as opposed to paper and textiles popular in the east.
There is a sharp contrast in social and economic heritage once you go west of the Apps.
For example, Rochester NY was incorporated in 1817, Springfield, MA became a town in 1636. That is 179 years, so Springfield has been around for almost as much time before Rochester was incorporated as it was after. That's a huge difference.
Pittsburgh was founded in 1758 and incorporated in 1771. The Mason-Dixon survey in 1780 put Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania. No major city in Ohio or elsewhere in the Midwest was incorporated until after 1800.
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Old 01-20-2016, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,252,873 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
In fact, that Chief Executive election in 2011 belies the notion of Pittsburgh/Allegheny County being socially conservative, considering one candidate was pro-choice, pro-gay marriage, pro-public transit and anti-fracking, and the other was an entrepreneur from India.
It certainly didn't help that Mr. Raja looks like this.


http://mije.org/sites/default/files/...02-534x300.jpg

Nice looking kids. I'm curious, however, about how Fitzgerald would have performed against a White Republican.
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Old 01-20-2016, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
338 posts, read 305,257 times
Reputation: 399
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeNigh View Post
Pittsburgh shouldn't be clumped up with erie and buffalo.
Get off your high horse.
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Old 01-20-2016, 06:18 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,753,027 times
Reputation: 931
For those saying Buffalo, Pittsburgh and Erie are "Midwestern" what are the characteristics of the "Midwest" and what geographic area does it consist of?
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Old 01-20-2016, 06:57 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,271,388 times
Reputation: 1655
Pittsburgh doesn't strike me as "East Coast" at all. It's actually very Appalachia with some Midwestern influences. Erie and Buffalo strike me as more Midwestern, too. You could group these cities in with Cleveland and Detroit based off similarities, really. Cincinnati and Pittsburgh are similar, too. East Coast cities like DC, Baltimore, and Philly are very different.
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Old 01-20-2016, 07:20 PM
 
56,638 posts, read 80,952,685 times
Reputation: 12518
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
They are Midwestern. They are part of the "old west" or a post-colonial America.
Basically anything west of the proclamation line of 1763 (basically the eastern continental divide) is Midwestern the cities and towns popped up during westward expansion in the early 1800s, which is 150-180 years after the North East (Boston, Springfield, Hartford, NYC etc) was settled. Also heavier industries (steel, automobiles) were out near Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Erie, as opposed to paper and textiles popular in the east.
There is a sharp contrast in social and economic heritage once you go west of the Apps.
For example, Rochester NY was incorporated in 1817, Springfield, MA became a town in 1636. That is 179 years, so Springfield has been around for almost as much time before Rochester was incorporated as it was after. That's a huge difference.
You still have to consider who settled Rochester, which is named after Nathaniel Rochester, a guy originally from VA/NC and there were people there before it became incorporated. Nathaniel Rochester - Rochester Wiki

History - Rochester Wiki

AA History 1770 to 1830

Many Revolutionary War veterans were given land for their service in the Interior Northeast as well.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 01-20-2016 at 07:38 PM..
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Old 01-20-2016, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,426 posts, read 11,933,106 times
Reputation: 10539
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
It certainly didn't help that Mr. Raja looks like this.


http://mije.org/sites/default/files/...02-534x300.jpg

Nice looking kids. I'm curious, however, about how Fitzgerald would have performed against a White Republican.
The office had already been in Democratic hands for eight years at the time he was elected. I mean, Dan Onarato was kinda a schumck, but he wasn't really a conservadem, just a corporate suckup.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
Pittsburgh doesn't strike me as "East Coast" at all. It's actually very Appalachia with some Midwestern influences. Erie and Buffalo strike me as more Midwestern, too. You could group these cities in with Cleveland and Detroit based off similarities, really. Cincinnati and Pittsburgh are similar, too. East Coast cities like DC, Baltimore, and Philly are very different.
East Coast does not equal Northeast.

I'd say it's fair to say Pittsburgh is equal parts Appalachia and Northeast. I really don't see much in the way of Midwestern elements.
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