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View Poll Results: Are Pittsburgh, Erie, and Buffalo Northeastern or Midwestern?
Northeastern 42 50.60%
Midwestern 10 12.05%
Mixed 31 37.35%
Voters: 83. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-21-2016, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Odd, western New York doesn't seem to have strong feelings either way. And some do like to say they're more midwestern, more to emphasize "we're not like NYC".
The NYC/Upstate rivalry is much stronger than the Philly/Pittsburgh rivalry. In part because Philly alone can never dominate Pennsylvania politics (in part because it's smaller, and in part because much of the suburbs remain Republican. The semi stable political alliances are more Philly/Pittsburgh versus the rural-focused interests of "The T" (or Pennsyltucky as it's sometimes called).
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Old 01-21-2016, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
"Eastern" and "Northeastern" go beyond mere geographic descriptors on this forum. When people say "it leans more Eastern," they really mean "more like New York or DC," which really means educated, liberal, sophisticated, cosmopolitan, etc. Just look at any of the "Cleveland is not the Midwest" threads to see this line of thought.
So again, as I said upthread, is Maine (aside from Portland) part of the Midwest then?

Just because other people use ridiculous definitions doesn't mean you have to defend them.
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Old 01-21-2016, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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As an aside, I find this whole "East Coast" thing odd.

My family is from the Philly area (and New York more distantly on my father's side). I grew up in Connecticut. I went to school in Massachusetts. I've lived in DC. I've spent good portions of my life visiting and exploring NYC and Boston.

I never once referred to the area as the East Coast. I never even heard the term used to describe the region when I was growing up, except to describe hip-hop, where it really just meant NYC. We called it the "Northeast" or the "Northeast Corridor" or sometimes "Bos-Wash." If someone used the term East Coast to describe anything besides hip-hop, I would have assumed they meant the entire eastern seaboard down to Florida.
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Old 01-21-2016, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I don't see that.....They also say that they are Northeastern, but what people say is that NYS does not equal NYC. Meaning, that there is variation within the state.
There's also variation within the South. "South" doesn't necessarily mean Mobile, Alabama but yet that's often the counterpoint that's raised in any accusation of a place being Southern: "We are more like ____ than Alabama!"

Nobody really scoffs at the idea of being "Eastern" or "Northeastern" (well, maybe Mississippians would). That type of disdain is reserved almost exclusively for the South and to a lesser extent the Midwest.
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Old 01-21-2016, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
So again, as I said upthread, is Maine (aside from Portland) part of the Midwest then?

Just because other people use ridiculous definitions doesn't mean you have to defend them.
I don't think the logic is absurd on its face. Political lines are to some extent arbitrary (not arbitrary in all ways, obviously). I think cities can have more in common with cities in different geographic regions than they do with cities in their own region. So if someone says that DC has more in common with Philadelphia than it does with Charlotte, I'm not completely inclined to disagree with that. That doesn't mean I think it's "Northeastern," however.

By geography, Pittsburgh is in the Northeast. But I can see how some would say the city has a Midwestern feel and why it gets lumped with cities like Cleveland rather than DC. It's the same way DC is in the geographic South but yet I can see how some would say it has a "Northeastern" feel.
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Old 01-21-2016, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I never once referred to the area as the East Coast. I never even heard the term used to describe the region when I was growing up, except to describe hip-hop, where it really just meant NYC. We called it the "Northeast" or the "Northeast Corridor" or sometimes "Bos-Wash." If someone used the term East Coast to describe anything besides hip-hop, I would have assumed they meant the entire eastern seaboard down to Florida.
I hear people use all of them. I only hear "Northeast Corridor" and "BosWash" in this forum mostly since Black dudes from Philly with names like Khalil and Mu'min don't say stuff like "I live in the Northeast Corridor." Most people would say "the Northeast" or even "Up North." "East Coast" is used as well but that's commonly understood, imo, to extend maybe as far down to Hampton Roads.
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Old 01-21-2016, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
By geography, Pittsburgh is in the Northeast. But I can see how some would say the city has a Midwestern feel and why it gets lumped with cities like Cleveland rather than DC. It's the same way DC is in the geographic South but yet I can see how some would say it has a "Northeastern" feel.
But how many people who say that have ever spent a considerable amount of time here? And what does "Midwestern feel" even mean? The only definition I can come up with is "not Northeastern." But this is false, because the vast majority of the "not Northeastern" traits in Pittsburgh come from its Appalachian heritage.
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Old 01-21-2016, 10:13 AM
 
56,775 posts, read 81,126,018 times
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Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
There's also variation within the South. "South" doesn't necessarily mean Mobile, Alabama but yet that's often the counterpoint that's raised in any accusation of a place being Southern: "We are more like ____ than Alabama!"

Nobody really scoffs at the idea of being "Eastern" or "Northeastern" (well, maybe Mississippians would). That type of disdain is reserved almost exclusively for the South and to a lesser extent the Midwest.
No one in any part of Upstate NY says they are Midwestern at all though. So, that is how the term Interior Northeast comes into play.

It isn't about disdain, but about location and even culture, as people may refer to the Great Lakes, but not to being Midwestern.
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Old 01-21-2016, 10:29 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
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Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
It certainly didn't help that Mr. Raja looks like this.


http://mije.org/sites/default/files/...02-534x300.jpg

Nice looking kids. I'm curious, however, about how Fitzgerald would have performed against a White Republican.
His skin color sure as hell didn't hurt him when he defeated a white guy by a 43-point margin in the Republican primary, did it? Take your racism accusation and shove it.

Funny how people claim that Republicans and white Pittsburghers are racist and xenophobic, and yet the nexus of both groups chose an immigrant from India to run for Allegheny County Chief Executive in 2011. If either group was even half as racist as you think they are, then Raja would've been buried in the Republican primary. There's no way in hell he would have been one of the last two standing, and don't even pretend otherwise. Furthermore, the choice in the general election was between him and a social liberal, so why did write-ins account for less than 1% of the vote? Why didn't more people protest their choices if Allegheny County is such a socially conservative place? How were those two the last two standing?

For that matter, since Allegheny County reformed its government in 1999, why has only one Republican been elected Chief Executive, and why did he last only one term? The Allegheny County Chief Executive was a moderate Republican from 1999-2003, a moderate Democrat from 2003-2011, and has been a liberal Democrat since 2011. So much for "trending red" in Allegheny County. And the trend in the six outer metropolitan counties is being overemphasized anyway, since Allegheny County has more population than all six of them combined, and four of the six are still hemorrhaging population. So why does it even matter? The outer counties are losing political clout.
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Old 01-21-2016, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
But how many people who say that have ever spent a considerable amount of time here? And what does "Midwestern feel" even mean? The only definition I can come up with is "not Northeastern." But this is false, because the vast majority of the "not Northeastern" traits in Pittsburgh come from its Appalachian heritage.
I think it stems in part from the fact that what people label as "the Interior Northeast" is not that distinct from Eastern Ohio and some part of the Upper Midwest. I also think being in the core of the Industrial Rust Belt plays a large role as well. Actually, that's one of the biggest associations people make with the Midwest (aside from farmland): tons and tons of White working class people (steel mills, auto manufacturers, etc.).
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