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View Poll Results: Are Pittsburgh, Erie, and Buffalo Northeastern or Midwestern?
Northeastern 42 50.60%
Midwestern 10 12.05%
Mixed 31 37.35%
Voters: 83. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-22-2016, 04:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
If anything, it shows that Cleveland has more in common with Interior Northeastern areas than most other Midwestern areas.
A good point. Cleveland is at the eastern edge of the Midwest region, Buffalo at the western edge of the Northeast region, and they're fairly close to each other. It's not surprising they're pretty similar.
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Old 01-22-2016, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
You'll notice that Cleveland, which one could say "leans" Northeastern tends to be the city/area used and when people say "Midwestern", they really mean the Great Lakes. However, Great Lakes and Midwestern aren't necessarily the same, as it has been mentioned in this thread. If that is the case, then the Syracuse area would be "Midwestern", as its metro touches Lake Ontario. Same with Rochester.
Some people may say Syracuse leans Midwestern. Start a thread about it.

Buffalo, on the other hand, has a lot in common with Midwestern cities like Cleveland and Detroit. Whether we want to say Cleveland and Detroit influence Buffalo or vice versa makes no difference to me. My point is that they are similar types of cities. It is a very logical grouping of cities, imo.
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Old 01-22-2016, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
A good point. Cleveland is at the eastern edge of the Midwest region, Buffalo at the western edge of the Northeast region, and they're fairly close to each other. It's not surprising they're pretty similar.
Can the Northeast expand in more than one direction?

Baltimore and DC were once indisputably Southern cities. Most posters on C-D say the MD-PA border is no longer the demarcation between North and South. Some now say it's the Potomac River. Others say the "Northeast" now begins north of Fredericksburg. So there's clearly this idea that the contours of the region are malleable.

Is it now possible that the Northeastern border has moved to its west to include Cleveland? Or is it possible that the Northeastern border lies somewhere east of Pittsburgh?
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Old 01-22-2016, 04:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I would say Polish cultural penetration on the East Coast is fairly weak. I first heard about Paczki Day from a friend in Detroit who looks like a younger version of Bernie Mac. He was like, "They don't have Paczki Day in Philly?" They might have a Paczki Day in Philly but it clearly hasn't had the level of overall cultural seepage the way pretzels, water ice, and hoagies have.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QgNJgkTBjPw
Comparatively, CT has quite a few areas that are high on the list in terms of Polish percentage. Hartford is 25th, Norwich-New London is tied for 39th, Torrington is 47th and New Haven is tied for 55th. Scranton-Wilkes Barre has the highest percentage for a Northeastern metro at just under 22% and is 4th in the country, according to this source. Quite a bit of PA and even some MA(Springfield, Worcester and Pittsfield) are within the top 100. NJ has a couple of areas up there as well(Trenton and Ocean City). Philly is 105 and Bridgeport CT is 106. Those in the Midwest that are ranked high are either in OH, MI, WI or in the NW Indiana/Chicagoland/northern Illinois area, with 1 area in MN. So, it seems to be concentrated around the Great Lakes, Interior Northeast and parts of the Bos-Wash corridor.
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Old 01-22-2016, 04:17 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Or maybe the Northeast border has moved east and lost Buffalo and Pittsburgh to the Midwest
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Old 01-22-2016, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Or maybe the Northeast border has moved east and lost Buffalo and Pittsburgh to the Midwest
It's possible. Maybe that's why they say pop instead of soda. Sorta like Southern culture being banished from Maryland.
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Old 01-22-2016, 04:24 PM
 
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And what about the western boundary of the Midwest? Are Buffalo and Pittsburgh in the same region as Rapid City?

The Midwest has the Great Lakes region and the Great Plains subregions which are pretty different from each other, but then there are states like Iowa which rally don't fit in either. The US Census Bureau divides the region into East North Central (IL/IN/MI/OH/WI) and West North Central (IA/KS/MN/MO/NE/ND/SD). The first is a pretty coherently defined region (Great Lakes, Rust Belt etc.) but the other just seems to be "the rest" lumped together.
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Old 01-22-2016, 04:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Some people may say Syracuse leans Midwestern. Start a thread about it.

Buffalo, on the other hand, has a lot in common with Midwestern cities like Cleveland and Detroit. Whether we want to say Cleveland and Detroit influence Buffalo or vice versa makes no difference to me. My point is that they are similar types of cities. It is a very logical grouping of cities, imo.
Not really, but you do have some industrial aspects that some may view that way. For the most part though, it is definitely an Interior Northeastern metro.

Detroit and Michigan has some similarities to Upstate NY, but it still lacks that Italian aspect, even though parts of its metro like Fraser and other nearby Macomb and Oakland County communities have quite a few. Its Hispanic population is more Mexican than Puerto Rican. It has more of an Arab influence as well. It has one of the highest Black percentages for a metro outside of the South, if not the highest.

It is also more car dependent or at least its built environment is, for obvious reasons. It does have walkable areas within the metro though.
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Old 01-22-2016, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
And what about the western boundary of the Midwest? Are Buffalo and Pittsburgh in the same region as Rapid City?
What about the westernmost boundary of the South? Are DC and Baltimore in the same region as El Paso?

You could do this all day. I'm with the idea of ignoring "arbitrary lines" and resorting to economic/cultural/historical groupings instead. But we need to either be flexible in all cases or rigid in all cases. We can't have it where the Mason Dixon Line is an arbitrary boundary ("culture doesn't stop at state lines!") and simultaneously say that the Midwest/Northeast stops at the OH-PA border.
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Old 01-22-2016, 04:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
It's possible. Maybe that's why they say pop instead of soda. Sorta like Southern culture being banished from Maryland.
Actually, if I'm not mistaken, parts of Ontario nearby also say "Pop" instead of "Soda" as well.
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