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View Poll Results: Are Pittsburgh, Erie, and Buffalo Northeastern or Midwestern?
Northeastern 42 50.60%
Midwestern 10 12.05%
Mixed 31 37.35%
Voters: 83. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-29-2013, 03:47 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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This again Well again these towns are part of the yankee northeast for sure. Just because Erie is on a great lake does not mean it is like Chicago or Detroit. That would be like saying Minneapolis is like the south because its on the same river as Memphis and NO. lol There is a huge cultural difference between those western great lakes towns and those that are on the eastern lakes like Buffalo and Erie. The US census agrees they are northeast, most midwesterners would agreee that they are northeastern, and most people who live in those towns would likely agree too. I used to live in the midwest, no one would ever consider any part of PA or NY to be "midwestern". There is a strong argument to be made however for Pittsburg to be part of appalachia, at least the northern version of it anyway.
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:26 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
This again Well again these towns are part of the yankee northeast for sure. Just because Erie is on a great lake does not mean it is like Chicago or Detroit. That would be like saying Minneapolis is like the south because its on the same river as Memphis and NO. lol There is a huge cultural difference between those western great lakes towns and those that are on the eastern lakes like Buffalo and Erie. The US census agrees they are northeast, most midwesterners would agreee that they are northeastern, and most people who live in those towns would likely agree too. I used to live in the midwest, no one would ever consider any part of PA or NY to be "midwestern". There is a strong argument to be made however for Pittsburg to be part of appalachia, at least the northern version of it anyway.
What big cultural differences do you notice between Buffalo and Erie and places like Chicago and Detroit.

[Ignoring the ones that comes from Chicago being a much bigger city]
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:00 AM
 
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Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
In addition to the lower number of so-called "white ethnics", the state of Maryland is 30% Black. No non-Southern state has nearly that high a proportion. The Washington and Baltimore metro areas areas are both over 25% Black as is the majority of central cities - something no major Northeastern city can claim. How does that make their demographics so obviously "Northeastern"?
There are some predominately Black cities of various sizes in the Northeast. Newark is the biggest city that is mostly Black and I believe that Philadelphia has more Black residents in plurality. I know that Rochester also has a Black plurality and possibly one of the bigger Connecticut cities does as well.
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Has anyone from Buffalo responded yet?

Regarding Pittsburgh, no one who from here thinks it's a Midwestern city. We have clear and strong links with DC, and to a lesser extent Baltimore and Philadelphia. We are getting a lot of NYC transplants who were priced out, but not many from Chicago.

But I think Buffalo does identify as Midwestern to some degree. I remember when I went to visit SUNY Buffalo when I was looking at colleges, when they were giving us a campus tour, the guides explained that Buffalo was "nothing like New York City" and "really a Midwestern city." '

Part of it, I think, is the different balance of power in the states. Philly is much larger than Pittsburgh, but it's not anywhere near the huge gulf between NYC and Buffalo. Pittsburgh's response to Philly disclaiming the region is to argue that we're an equal component of the state. Buffalo doing the same thing would be laughable, so instead they just shrug their shoulders and look westward.
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
There are some predominately Black cities of various sizes in the Northeast. Newark is the biggest city that is mostly Black and I believe that Philadelphia has more Black residents in plurality. I know that Rochester also has a Black plurality and possibly one of the bigger Connecticut cities does as well.
Bridgeport: 38.2% Hispanic, 34.6% Black, 22.7% Non-Hispanic White
Hartford: 43.4% Hispanic, 38.7% Black, 15.8% Non-Hispanic White
New Haven: 35.4% Black, 31.8% Non-Hispanic White, 27.4% Hispanic

In general, the black percentage in all of the cities has been falling in recent years, as the Hispanic population in Connecticut cities (mostly Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, and others moving up from NYC), continues to rise (not just in the bigger cities, but smaller ones like Waterbury and Meridan as well).

The only black-majority municipality in Connecticut is Bloomfield, which is a suburb just to the north of Hartford.
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
There are some predominately Black cities of various sizes in the Northeast. Newark is the biggest city that is mostly Black and I believe that Philadelphia has more Black residents in plurality. I know that Rochester also has a Black plurality and possibly one of the bigger Connecticut cities does as well.
While this is true I think the poster's point was on a metro and state scale nowhere in the northeast is like that.
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:24 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Has anyone from Buffalo responded yet?

Regarding Pittsburgh, no one who from here thinks it's a Midwestern city. We have clear and strong links with DC, and to a lesser extent Baltimore and Philadelphia. We are getting a lot of NYC transplants who were priced out, but not many from Chicago.
From whatever reason, when we have these "midwestern debates", Pittsburgh comes up more than Buffalo.

Quote:
But I think Buffalo does identify as Midwestern to some degree. I remember when I went to visit SUNY Buffalo when I was looking at colleges, when they were giving us a campus tour, the guides explained that Buffalo was "nothing like New York City" and "really a Midwestern city."

Part of it, I think, is the different balance of power in the states. Philly is much larger than Pittsburgh, but it's not anywhere near the huge gulf between NYC and Buffalo. Pittsburgh's response to Philly disclaiming the region is to argue that we're an equal component of the state. Buffalo doing the same thing would be laughable, so instead they just shrug their shoulders and look westward.
That, and New York City and downstate NY in general gets a negative reputation among upstaters. The dominance of downstate NY of the state is resented, and the upstaters often feel they have little in common with downstate, so they'd rather say "we're midwestern" as a way of saying, "we're not like those from New York City". I meant someone who bicycled through upstate NY from New York City to Wisconsin. He thought upstate NY felt midwestern to him and not that different from Wisconsin. Perhaps he meant downstate NY felt more different from upstate NY than Wisconsin did from upstate NY? The hills, of course, let him know very clearly that upstate NY was not Wisconsin. When I started talking to him he implied he was from either his starting point or destination, I couldn't tell for sure but I could make a very good (and correct) guess based off of his complexion; his very light blond hair made him look very not from the NYC metro and closer to a northern Midwest stereotype.

About colleges, both Buffalo and Pittsburgh have state schools that help tie their cities culturally to other, more distant parts of the state. SUNY Buffalo definitely gets a lot of students from downstate NY, and from I what I've heard Pitt gets some students from eastern PA.
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:33 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
While this is true I think the poster's point was on a metro and state scale nowhere in the northeast is like that.
True. Most of the smaller Northeast cities mentioned have a concentrated black population mostly in the center city while the metro black population is relatively small overall. And for New England, few cities have more blacks than hispanics, southern cities and metros are usually much more black than hispanic. Still, due to residential segregation, some northeastern cities have large black communities. Northeastern Brooklyn is the largest predominately black neighborhood in the country, maybe 700,000 people? The city itself has 2 million black people. One large difference between the black community in New York City (and to a lesser extent New England) and the South is a sizeable fraction of the black population is descended from recent immigrants (maybe 1/3?) This gives the black community a very different culture. If you look at a list of famous African-Americans from New York City, a large number of them are West Indian.

Last edited by nei; 04-29-2013 at 07:41 AM..
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:39 AM
 
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Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
While this is true I think the poster's point was on a metro and state scale nowhere in the northeast is like that.
On the metro, I believe that Philadelphia is the only Northeastern metro over 20% Black. Here's a good list: BlackDemographics.com | Black City Population

New Haven, it appears to still have a Black plurality. Miami is the Southern metro exception in terms of having a large portion of the Black population having West Indian/Caribbean roots.

As for Buffalo, outside of saying pop instead of soda, it is Northeastern.
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
That, and New York City and downstate NY in general gets a negative reputation among upstaters. The dominance of downstate NY of the state is resented, and the upstaters often feel they have little in common with downstate, so they'd rather say "we're midwestern" as a way of saying, "we're not like those from New York City".
In Pittsburgh, the typical political alliance has been Philly+Pittsburgh versus the rural areas in the center of the state. Thus, Pittsburgh doesn't have a strong rivalry with Philly - slagging Philly is what people in the boonies do. Pittsburgh's tend to hate Philadelphians who either forget the city exists or argue that both cities aren't on roughly equal levels though.

In contrast, Pittsburgh has a very strong rivalry with Cleveland, which springs from a football rivalry ultimately. This might be part of the reason people from Pittsburgh are so loathe to be called Midwestern. No one wants to be associated with the Browns.
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