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View Poll Results: Are Pittsburgh, Erie, and Buffalo Northeastern or Midwestern?
Northeastern 42 50.60%
Midwestern 10 12.05%
Mixed 31 37.35%
Voters: 83. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-25-2016, 08:45 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Michigan and Ohio don't much want the Midwest label either.



The Meaning of Midwest - Hour Detroit - September 2008 - Detroit, MI
It is not surprising that Michigan and Ohio feel a little different.

Besides the sheer distance, Michigan for example has more interaction with Canada then it does Kansas or Nebraska, much of the Midwest is heavily farmed and relatively flat land. And in the lower Midwest there are fewer natural lakes.

In contrast, Michigan as well as parts of Minnesota and Michigan are heavily forested and have many natural lakes and ponds. Its vacation country, much like parts of the Northeast. In addition Ohio has many hills in its southwestern portion, again like parts of the Northeast (and Southeast).

So the real question to me is not if parts of Pennsylvania and New York should be in the Midwest, but which parts of the Midwest really belong in the Northeast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest..._United_States
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Old 01-25-2016, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
It is not surprising that Michigan and Ohio feel a little different.

Besides the sheer distance, Michigan for example has more interaction with Canada then it does Kansas or Nebraska, much of the Midwest is heavily farmed and relatively flat land. And in the lower Midwest there are fewer natural lakes.

In contrast, Michigan as well as parts of Minnesota and Michigan are heavily forested and have many natural lakes and ponds. Its vacation country, much like parts of the Northeast. In addition Ohio has many hills in its southwestern portion, again like parts of the Northeast (and Southeast).

So the real question to me is not if parts of Pennsylvania and New York should be in the Midwest, but which parts of the Midwest really belong in the Northeast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest..._United_States
So the Northeast could extend to Wisconsin as well since it is one of the most heavily forested states in the Union.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest..._United_States

I think I probably associate the Midwest with cities more than some other posters do. I think mostly about the movie Rudy.
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Old 01-25-2016, 08:53 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
It is not surprising that Michigan and Ohio feel a little different.

Besides the sheer distance, Michigan for example has more interaction with Canada then it does Kansas or Nebraska, much of the Midwest is heavily farmed and relatively flat land. And in the lower Midwest there are fewer natural lakes.

In contrast, Michigan as well as parts of Minnesota and Michigan are heavily forested and have many natural lakes and ponds. Its vacation country, much like parts of the Northeast. In addition Ohio has many hills in its southwestern portion, again like parts of the Northeast (and Southeast).

So the real question to me is not if parts of Pennsylvania and New York should be in the Midwest, but which parts of the Midwest really belong in the Northeast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest..._United_States
I was thinking the same thing and could be another thread. For instance, when I was going to school in MI, I saw a lot of town names that were the same as those in Upstate NY like DeWitt, Meridian Township, Onondaga, Livonia, Farmington, Romulus, Canton, Dexter, Brighton, Delhi Township, Waverly, Charlotte(pronounced shar-lot like the NW Rochester neighborhood), Mount Morris, Wayne, Ithaca, Lansing, etc or counties like Livingston, Wayne and Monroe.
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Old 01-25-2016, 09:01 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I was thinking the same thing and could be another thread. For instance, when I was going to school in MI, I saw a lot of town names that were the same as those in Upstate NY like DeWitt, Meridian Township, Onondaga, Livonia, Farmington, Romulus, Canton, Dexter, Brighton, Delhi Township, Waverly, Charlotte(pronounced shar-lot like the NW Rochester neighborhood), Mount Morris, Wayne, Ithaca, Lansing, etc or counties like Livingston, Wayne and Monroe.
Those as KatrinaWitt said earlier you can find a lot of eastern names in western states as well. Though Michigan probably has more of upstate NY names
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Old 01-25-2016, 09:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Those as KatrinaWitt said earlier you can find a lot of eastern names in western states as well. Though Michigan probably has more of upstate NY names
Right and your last sentence was the thing that got me.

Another thing I've noticed with parts of MI and NY next to/near parts of Ontario is that you can find people with family/relatives on both sides of the border. It can be with people that have immigrated within the last few generations, but you also have people with long time roots and of different backgrounds that have this as well.
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Old 01-25-2016, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Pennsylvania may have exported more names than any other state.

Quote:
Munsee, meaning "at the place where stones are gathered together," was one of the divisions of the Delaware. The word can be traced from Pennsylvania, where it is spelled Muncy, to Indiana and Illinois where it is Muncie.

In Coos County, Oregon is a town of Allegany, a Delaware word. There are Allegheny Counties in Virginia and North Carolina, and an Allegany County in New York. The name was carried to Sierra County, California by settlers from Alleghany, Pennsylvania, who used it for a village and a mining camp.
https://journals.psu.edu/phj/article...le/21815/21584
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Old 01-25-2016, 09:13 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Right and your last sentence was the thing that got me.

Another thing I've noticed with parts of MI and NY next to/near parts of Ontario is that you can find people with family/relatives on both sides of the border. It can be with people that have immigrated within the last few generations, but you also have people with long time roots and of different backgrounds that have this as well.
That's true of northern New England but with Quebec, though usually the immigration was in the 19th century.
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Old 01-25-2016, 09:18 AM
 
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Born in Canada, 1930:

Michigan 202,316
Illinois 43,589
Minnesota 27,102
Ohio 26,847
Wisconsin 15,572
North Dakota 12,241
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Old 01-25-2016, 09:26 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
So the Northeast could extend to Wisconsin as well since it is one of the most heavily forested states in the Union.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest..._United_States
I'll add that that link refers to timberland not forestcover. That link has New York as 51% timberland. Adding in parkland, it's 63% forested.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/lands_for...fras070110.pdf

Page 13. The farmed areas of upstate New York and Wisconsin look a bit similar, but on average New York is hillier. The towns of upstate New York look older with more neighborhoods with Victorian-era homes. Haven't seen much of Wisconsin, though.
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Old 01-25-2016, 09:27 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Born in Canada, 1930:

Michigan 202,316
Illinois 43,589
Minnesota 27,102
Ohio 26,847
Wisconsin 15,572
North Dakota 12,241
and for New England and New York? Interesting Michigan is so much different, though it makes sense given it has more of a border (well Minnesota and North Dakota do but that area is rather unpopulated).
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