U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Are Pittsburgh, Erie, and Buffalo Northeastern or Midwestern?
Northeastern 42 50.60%
Midwestern 10 12.05%
Mixed 31 37.35%
Voters: 83. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-25-2016, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,737,517 times
Reputation: 5374

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I guess. I would say they are equally different. It's like saying a whale is more similar to a human being than a frog because it's a mammal.
Actually it's not like that at all but whatever...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-25-2016, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Actually it's not like that at all but whatever...
I think so. You have a coastal, liberal state with a lot of European ethnic diversity and a landlocked, conservative state with not a lot of diversity that's heavily dependent on agriculture. They're not similar whatsoever. To the extent that it's more similar to Mass than Mississippi is, the point is taken. But to me it's no different from saying Barbados is more similar to the U.S. than Mexico.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2016, 07:58 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
Reputation: 14805
Is Iowa conservative? At least in the last presidential election, it had a Democratic lean though obviously not as much as Massachusetts. By white vote, it was probably among the highest non-New England states.

Regardless, I'd expect Iowa to feel much more similar to Massachusetts than Mississippi just from being northern. Maybe more so since I live in the relatively rural, less diverse side of Massachusetts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2016, 08:31 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,752,302 times
Reputation: 931
Indeed, the Northeast and Midwest are subsections of the North.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2016, 09:05 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
Reputation: 14805
One thing that makes the Northeast distinctive is a relatively low amount of white evangelical Protestants combined with high percentage of Catholics. The Pew survey sampled every state and some larger metros:

Religion in America: U.S. Religious Data, Demographics and Statistics | Pew Research Center

Pittsburgh:

15% Evangelical Protestant
25% Mainline Protestant
2% Historically Black Protestant
32% Catholic
18% Unaffiliated

So a rather high amount of Catholics, but more Protestants. Philadelphia isn't too different, but with more black protestants (Catholic as % of white christians is still similar. More irreligious people, which suggests less social conservatism:

Philadelphia:

13% Evangelical Protestant
17% Mainline Protestant
11% Historically Black Protestant
26% Catholic
24% Unaffiliated

Neighboring New York City is more different from either:


9% Evangelical Protestant
8% Mainline Protestant
6% Historically Black Protestant
33% Catholic
24% Unaffiliated
8% Jewish

More Catholics than Protestants; not many evangelicals at all. I'll add a large minority of evangelicals there are likely hispanic. New England cities have a similar pattern, though not as Jewish. Detroit isn't anywhere as Catholic as the other cities I listed:

20% Evangelical Protestant
14% Mainline Protestant
15% Historically Black Protestant
16% Catholic
24% Unaffiliated

So at least of the cities I looked at so far, Pittsburgh fits a bit better with the Northeas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2016, 09:22 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,137 posts, read 9,909,375 times
Reputation: 6424
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
So the Northeast could extend to Wisconsin as well since it is one of the most heavily forested states in the Union.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest..._United_States

I think I probably associate the Midwest with cities more than some other posters do. I think mostly about the movie Rudy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I'll add that that link refers to timberland not forestcover. That link has New York as 51% timberland. Adding in parkland, it's 63% forested.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/lands_for...fras070110.pdf

Page 13. The farmed areas of upstate New York and Wisconsin look a bit similar, but on average New York is hillier. The towns of upstate New York look older with more neighborhoods with Victorian-era homes. Haven't seen much of Wisconsin, though.
Actually Bajan you maybe right. If you started from scratch and divided the country into four equal parts, then Wisconsin would be in the northeastern part. Anyway as you can see from that map, Wisconsin, Minnesota and especially Michigan with their lakes and forests are clearly different from many of the other Midwestern states.

Interestingly, New York once claimed southern Ontario until it lost the claims with the Quebec Act of 1774. If New York had been able to keep the claims then Windsor, Ontario might be Windsor, New York across from Detroit. Then New York would border Michigan and be north of Ohio. It might change the way we look at both the Midwestern and Northeastern states - at least those near the Great Lakes.

Yeah Nei, I also saw that the Wikipedia article undercounts New York for forest lands. Probably other states as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2016, 09:22 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I think so. You have a coastal, liberal state with a lot of European ethnic diversity and a landlocked, conservative state with not a lot of diversity that's heavily dependent on agriculture. They're not similar whatsoever. To the extent that it's more similar to Mass than Mississippi is, the point is taken. But to me it's no different from saying Barbados is more similar to the U.S. than Mexico.
Iowa is actually fairly diverse, especially in the cities. Fewer than 5% live on farms. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...4iw6FdNStYFtkA

Here are the top 5 industries: http://www.newsmax.com/t/newsmax/article/636536

The ethnicities are different than in the east-more Scandinavians.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2016, 09:58 PM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
821 posts, read 1,254,660 times
Reputation: 757
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
3. Pittsburgh was a river city which peaked early. Major population growth was pretty much done in Allegheny County by 1910. Growth in the teens and 20s was pretty minor in comparison (around 15% each decade). In contrast, the Upper Midwest cities all continued to grow at a very impressive clip at least through the Great Depression. This early end to massive population growth is part of the reason that Pittsburgh never got a large black population in the Great Migration, along with missing out on the huge influx of Appalachian "hillbillies" which shaped working-class white culture in much of the Midwest in the early 20th century. Local population growth was enough to deal with employment demand, so there was no longer any reason for outsiders to move there.

.
That is correct, Pittsburgh as well as southwestern Pennsylvania including nearby northern West Virginia and eastern Ohio peaked early.


Also this region is in Appalachia, so any migrants that moved within in the region were already in it. Most people do not realize that there was a steady stream of people from this region that moved to northeastern Ohio to work in the factories in the 1940's-1960's along with other Appalachian people that moved from southern Ohio, the rest of West Virginia, and parts of Kentucky. However the bulk that moved to northeast Ohio were from the nearby Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia locations.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2016, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Iowa is actually fairly diverse, especially in the cities. Fewer than 5% live on farms. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...4iw6FdNStYFtkA
How many people in any agricultural state do you think actually live on a farm?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2016, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Is Iowa conservative? At least in the last presidential election, it had a Democratic lean though obviously not as much as Massachusetts. By white vote, it was probably among the highest non-New England states.
Socially moderate. Conservative on economic issues. Ethanol also played a large role in Obama's success there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top