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Old 04-29-2013, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Maryland
4,268 posts, read 5,486,452 times
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No. See: the interior plans and northern mountain west states, Indiana, your occasional Ohio and New Hampshire.
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Limbo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sammer33 View Post
I was noticing, the northern states are mostly blue, and the southern are mostly red. It is interesting, also as the northern states are closer to canada (A blue state itself). What do you think?
I don't think that is fair. There is a lot of variation within each individual state. Metro regions are usually blue and rural areas are usually red.

If a state voted, say 70%+ for a certain party, then it would be safer to call them red or blue. The states that fall within 10 points of 50% have far too much variation to be assigned the red/blue monicker.
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Old 04-29-2013, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Calera, AL
1,166 posts, read 1,445,824 times
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There are some conservative bastions in the North and West, but for the most part, it's blue-leaning. The South is slowly but surely changing. There was a time not all that long ago when states like Virginia, North Carolina, and Florida could be counted as solidly red. Even Georgia is showing signs that going blue one of these days is not out of the question (because and only because of the ATL metro).

If Memphis, western Mississippi, northeastern Louisiana, and southeastern Arkansas broke off and formed their own state of Delta, it'd probably be the bluest state in the nation.
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Old 04-29-2013, 10:21 AM
 
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Look at the county maps...it generally paints a different picture. Urban centers tend to be blue. Rural areas and smaller cities and towns tend to be red, and the suburbs are usually a battleground.
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Old 04-29-2013, 12:25 PM
 
17 posts, read 42,902 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Joshua View Post
A lot of people seem to forget this 1984 Election Map
wow
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Old 04-29-2013, 12:46 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,268 posts, read 19,560,434 times
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In recent years, the northeast and the pacific coast have been basically shoe-ins for the Democrat party. To some extent, this has also been the case with some of the upper midwest. The rest of the nation is mostly Republican or battleground.
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:47 PM
 
Location: MD suburbs of DC
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Northern states are generally not red, and Southern states are generally not blue, though both can be moderate (such as Florida, North Carolina, Indiana, and Ohio).
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:49 PM
 
Location: back in Philadelphia!
3,254 posts, read 4,738,933 times
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Southern strategy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 04-29-2013, 04:38 PM
 
Location: One of the 13 original colonies.
10,162 posts, read 6,496,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Northern states are moderate to blue. Southern states are moderate to red. Then there are the swing states. The argument of Northern states being blue fails when one considers Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota.
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I agree. There is no such thing as a true blue or red state.
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Old 04-29-2013, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
183 posts, read 241,663 times
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Seems to be an urban/rural divide. Even in the north, rural areas heavily vote republican. Its just that in states like New York and Illinois, plus others, the population in the metros are high enough to overpower the rural areas in the state. And here in the south like GA, TN, & TX the cities tend to vote democrat, but many of the suburbs vote red, although this trend is quickly reversing, plus these states still have a pretty high % of people living in rural areas as well.
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