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Old 05-04-2013, 12:57 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Northern states are moderate to blue. Southern states are moderate to red. Then there are the swing states. The argument of Northern states being blue fails when one considers Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota.
Kansas is not northern.
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Old 05-04-2013, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Kansas is not northern.
Kansa is not Southern...
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Old 05-04-2013, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amercity View Post
Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Indiana, Idaho and West Virginia are all close to canada and are generally above the mason-dixon line and they are still moderate to red states. Then you have states like new mexico, colorado, california, maryland and florida which are generally considered in the southern portions of america that still tend to be moderate to blue. your logic is flawed
Just for the record, West Virginia is not close Canada-

27 U.S. States North of Canada -- Map

97% of West Virginia is below the Mason-Dixon, the northern panhandle is less than 3% of West Virginia's territory.
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Old 05-04-2013, 06:06 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
Kansa is not Southern...

That would be correct, it is no man's land. It certainly isn't a northern state, though.
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Old 05-05-2013, 06:39 AM
 
Location: MD suburbs of DC
607 posts, read 1,094,645 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobilee View Post
Just for the record, West Virginia is not close Canada-

27 U.S. States North of Canada -- Map

97% of West Virginia is below the Mason-Dixon, the northern panhandle is less than 3% of West Virginia's territory.
The Mason-Dixon line is not a good way to judge culture. Now, WV is mostly Southern culturally (and mostly Republican) but there's more than 3% of the state that's Northern in culture, I'd say a third of the state.
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Old 05-05-2013, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Florida
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The biggest differences are among white voters. White voters in the north are mostly blue while southern whites are solidly red. Close to 90% of all white people in Mississippi and Alabama voted Republican last year. However almost all black people everywhere vote blue.

However you have southern states like FL, VA, and NC. Most whites in those states vote red but they have urban areas with a lot of northers who vote blue. So these votes get overshadowed. I remember in FL last year, 6 counties voted for Obama but the other 61 FL counties voted for Romney. Because of these 6 counties, Obama won in FL, but not by an overwhelming amount.
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Old 05-05-2013, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Cbus
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rural South = Extremely red besides African-American voters
Suburban South = generally very red
Urban South = moderately to very blue

rural north = Not entirely sure but I'd expect moderately red
suburban north = pretty evenly split, used to be uniformly red but is no longer that way
Urban North = extremely blue

Obviously there are exceptions as there are with any wide sweeping generalizations and politics are far more complex than simply red vs. blue as there are libertarians, social conservatives, fiscal conservatives, etc.
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Old 05-05-2013, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,234,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by streetcreed View Post
Ohio is a swing state, but this is because the state is divided into regions that always vote along predicatable lines. The urban city limits all go blue. Then most metros are solidly blue as well (cleveland/akron/youngstown/columbus/Toledo) The rural areas tend moderate to red. Though, in Ohio, some rural areas are not as red as Illonois or Indiana. There are many that are red by only a slim margin. Also, Ohio borders the east and has some rural areas (in the eastern/se part of the state) that have a history of white rural voters voting democratic.

The swing part is really based on turn out. If a larger part of the electorate actually turns out to vote the urban/suburban vote cancels out the rural vote and the state is actually light blue to blue. This is why the state has gone solidly for Obama, it is very hard for Republicans to honestly win based on the fact that the demographics are in favor of the Dems. There really isn't as much swing as it is based on the turnout. Further, the area of the state gaining population is central ohio/Columbus and the area is solidly blue in the city and most of the suburbs. This isn't going to help the Republicans, in Presidential elections, in the future.
That's pretty much the same way Missouri is as well, although our swing state status could be in jeopardy. STL and KC and Columbia usually vote blue, as well as some of the counties along the Mississippi River. The rest of the state leans solidly red. And the margins for republican or democrat, except for this election, were always slim. I would NEVER describe Ohio as a solid blue state..to do so is incredibly foolish. And I'm not sure I agree Ohio is becoming more blue as time goes on....only two elections ago it voted Republican.
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Old 05-05-2013, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,234,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Kansas is not northern.
Your argument for this being? Kansas is historically, demographically, culturally, and linguistically more Northern than it is Southern. Climatologically it might be split, but I would always call Kansas a Northern state before a Southern state. You are on this mad campaign to discredit me...I suggest you stop, because it's failing.
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Old 05-05-2013, 03:07 PM
 
Location: IN
20,865 posts, read 36,004,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Your argument for this being? Kansas is historically, demographically, culturally, and linguistically more Northern than it is Southern. Climatologically it might be split, but I would always call Kansas a Northern state before a Southern state. You are on this mad campaign to discredit me...I suggest you stop, because it's failing.
It was solidly a Northern state due to the Civil War events and the historical events of the time period, but has become far more culturally alligned with Oklahoma and Texas over the last several decades due to an extremely regressive shift in its political voting patterns. Kansas is much more like Texas than Iowa when it comes to voting patterns in the present day. That is a fact. It has very little in common with the Midwest because of its voting patterns, and I would say it is more conservative than Nebraska or the Dakotas, therefore it is a definite regional outlier. In terms of climate, Kansas has little at all in common with the Midwest due the overall average temperatures being substantially warmer than the rest of the region along with low average annual snowfall amounts. In the present day, 2013, Kansas is not as Northern as the past. In conclusion, someone like Sam Brownback would NEVER get elected in a core Midwest state or any state in the Great Lakes region.

Last edited by GraniteStater; 05-05-2013 at 06:18 PM..
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