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Old 05-05-2013, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,234,215 times
Reputation: 998

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
It was solidly a Northern state due to the Civil War events and the historical events of the time period, but has become far more culturally alligned with Oklahoma and Texas over the last several decades due to an extremely regressive shift in its political voting patterns. Kansas is much more like Texas than Iowa when it comes to voting patterns in the present day. That is a fact. It has very little in common with the Midwest because of its voting patterns, and I would say it is more conservative than Nebraska or the Dakotas, therefore it is a definite regional outlier. In terms of climate, Kansas has little at all in common with the Midwest due the overall average temperatures being substantially warmer than the rest of the region along with low average annual snowfall amounts. In the present day, 2013, Kansas is not as Northern as the past. In conclusion, someone like Sam Brownback would NEVER get elected in a core Midwest state or any state in the Great Lakes region.
Culturally aligned with Oklahoma and Texas? ROFL!!! Those same political voting patterns have been present in Kansas and the Dakotas. BEsides politics, Kansas is culturally nothing like OK or Texas. So you're telling me that Kansas is a Southern state. Wow. Talk about delusional. That's a good one. Climatalogically, that may be true also, but it's climate isn't that different from Nebraska. Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota are ALL more like Texas than Iowa when it comes to voting. You are superficially trying to break Kansas away even from the states to the North of it politically, which is a flat-out lie. Kansas is not a Southern state. I'm sorry...it's just not. Demographically, culturally, or linguistically. Your campaign to make Kansas part of the south only gets more ridiculous by the day. Get a clue or quit bugging me with your ridiculous arguments. Kansas is not more like Oklahoma and Texas than Nebraska. That is irrefutable, no matter what kind of argument you might try to present.
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Old 05-05-2013, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,699 posts, read 8,502,639 times
Reputation: 4898
Canada is Blue? No, it just has a radically different political history and political tradition, despite the cultural similarities in other spheres. Don't try and lump us into your two state dichotomous view of all politics, we have diversity of political parties, none of which are similar to the Democratic Party, although I admit they're probably closer to that party then they are to Republican ideology, which is quite particularly American. Still, quite a stretch to draw parallels to the Democratic Party, which is a foreign party.
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Old 05-05-2013, 03:38 PM
 
29,955 posts, read 27,450,839 times
Reputation: 18547
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
rural South = Extremely red besides African-American voters
Suburban South = generally very red
Urban South = moderately to very blue

rural north = Not entirely sure but I'd expect moderately red
suburban north = pretty evenly split, used to be uniformly red but is no longer that way
Urban North = extremely blue

Obviously there are exceptions as there are with any wide sweeping generalizations and politics are far more complex than simply red vs. blue as there are libertarians, social conservatives, fiscal conservatives, etc.
That about sums it up.

I'd also say that suburban red is of a slightly different sort than the rural red. Social issues are the primary driver of the red of rural areas, and while they play a role in red voting patterns in suburbia, I'd say that fiscal issues play a stronger role, particularly when it comes to taxes, infrastructure, etc.
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Old 05-05-2013, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,058,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
That about sums it up.

I'd also say that suburban red is of a slightly different sort than the rural red. Social issues are the primary driver of the red of rural areas, and while they play a role in red voting patterns in suburbia, I'd say that fiscal issues play a stronger role, particularly when it comes to taxes, infrastructure, etc.
Social issues are the primary driver of the blue in the hip, trendy areas as well. If you take the P&OC forum as an example, its always social issues first followed by economic issues for BOTH sides. The only exception I can really think of is the Goldwater Republicans in Arizona or the blue dog Democrats in the Great Lakes states.
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Old 05-05-2013, 05:24 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
7,182 posts, read 5,425,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Kansas is much more like Texas than Iowa when it comes to voting patterns in the present day.
Kansas voters are very enlightened then. Texas is doing great while Iowa, not so much.
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Old 05-05-2013, 05:29 PM
 
462 posts, read 583,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sammer33 View Post
I was noticing, the northern states are mostly blue, and the southern are mostly red. It is interesting, also as the northern states are closer to canada (A blue state itself). What do you think?
Pretty much every state, outside of New England, has rural and suburban counties vote red, more urban counties vote blue. Certain groups are more likely to vote for one party or another based on religion (or lack thereof), ethnicity, and general regional culture.
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Old 05-05-2013, 06:03 PM
 
29,955 posts, read 27,450,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Social issues are the primary driver of the blue in the hip, trendy areas as well. If you take the P&OC forum as an example, its always social issues first followed by economic issues for BOTH sides. The only exception I can really think of is the Goldwater Republicans in Arizona or the blue dog Democrats in the Great Lakes states.
My point was that there can be more of a social/fiscal distinction when it comes to places that trend red than in places that trend blue.
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Old 05-05-2013, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,058,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
My point was that there can be more of a social/fiscal distinction when it comes to places that trend red than in places that trend blue.
I would disagree. Take a look at Southern cities for instance, many of them very blue. However, they are nowhere near the type of social liberalism you find in places like Berkeley and San Francisco. Take Little Rock for instance. It has a strong religious/conservative culture despite being a heavily Democratic city.
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Old 05-05-2013, 06:22 PM
 
Location: IN
20,863 posts, read 35,998,811 times
Reputation: 13310
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Culturally aligned with Oklahoma and Texas? ROFL!!! Those same political voting patterns have been present in Kansas and the Dakotas. BEsides politics, Kansas is culturally nothing like OK or Texas. So you're telling me that Kansas is a Southern state. Wow. Talk about delusional. That's a good one. Climatalogically, that may be true also, but it's climate isn't that different from Nebraska. Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota are ALL more like Texas than Iowa when it comes to voting. You are superficially trying to break Kansas away even from the states to the North of it politically, which is a flat-out lie. Kansas is not a Southern state. I'm sorry...it's just not. Demographically, culturally, or linguistically. Your campaign to make Kansas part of the south only gets more ridiculous by the day. Get a clue or quit bugging me with your ridiculous arguments. Kansas is not more like Oklahoma and Texas than Nebraska. That is irrefutable, no matter what kind of argument you might try to present.
The only major item separating Kansas from the states to the south of it is educational attainment. Demographically Kansas is very similar to Oklahoma and Texas in terms of its age population pyramid structure. I would agree that culturally and lingustically it doesn't have a lot in common with its southern or northern neighbors, occupying a middle ground in that regard. The social culture of the Great Plains states is far different than the Midwest overall and I don't think you could argue that. If another individual like Brownback gets elected in Kansas again it will drag the state straight down the drain and it will lead to a large brain drain.

Last edited by GraniteStater; 05-06-2013 at 06:33 PM..
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Old 05-05-2013, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,234,215 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The only major item separating Kansas from the states to the south of it is educational attainment. Demographically Kansas is very similar to Oklahoma and Texas in terms of its age population pyramid structure. I would agree that culturally and lingustically it doesn't have a lot in common with its southern or northern neighbors, occupying a middle ground in that regard. The social culture of the Great Plains states is far different than the Midwest overall and I don't think you could argue that. If another individual like Brownback gets elected in Kansas again it will drag the state straight down the drain and it will lead to a large brain drain, though.
You're not agreeing with me on anything. I don't agree that Kansas acts as a middle ground state either. Kansas is very much like Nebraska. Age population pyramid structure? What about ancestry, religion, things of that nature? I doubt it. Linguistically Kansas is more like its northern neighbors than Texas. Linguistics studies prove this. Culturally, Kansas is NOT A MIDDLEGROUND STATE. I don't think you could find a tangible difference between Kansas and its northern neighbors vs. its sweet-tea drinking, southern-sounding neighbors. Kansas is considered a Midwestern state. While there may be cultural differences between the Western Midwest and the Eastern Midwest, the two are nonetheless considered two sides of the same coin.
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