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Old 05-05-2013, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
rural South = Extremely red besides African-American voters
Suburban South = generally very red
Urban South = moderately to very blue
Not quite. Generally speaking, white suburban voters in the South are the most Republican (outside of less culturally southern areas like South Florida, Northern Virginia, Triangle Region of North Carolina, etc). White rural voters generally are as Republican in national races these days, but they can still be convinced to vote for conservative Democrats in local races.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
rural north = Not entirely sure but I'd expect moderately red
suburban north = pretty evenly split, used to be uniformly red but is no longer that way
Urban North = extremely blue
It all depends upon the state. In New England, the Pacific Northwest, and parts of the Upper Midwest, even rural areas lean left. In fact, in Wisconsin and Minnesota, the suburbs/exurbs around Milwaukee and Minneapolis are far more conservative than the rural areas. New Hampshire shows some of the same dynamic, as the rural parts of the state are more liberal than the area in the Boston metro, which has been colonized by tax-avoiding M*******s.
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Old 05-05-2013, 09:28 PM
 
811 posts, read 823,325 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smb90 View Post
Seems to be an urban/rural divide. Even in the north, rural areas heavily vote republican. Its just that in states like New York and Illinois, plus others, the population in the metros are high enough to overpower the rural areas in the state. And here in the south like GA, TN, & TX the cities tend to vote democrat, but many of the suburbs vote red, although this trend is quickly reversing, plus these states still have a pretty high % of people living in rural areas as well.
The only suburbs in the South that are "reversing", to mean from Republican to Democrat, are those becoming less white as a percentage of the total population. That's it. There is no such thing as suburban white liberals in the south, such that they are large enough to be the majority to win an election. If anything, southern suburban voters are continuing to become more Republican, though I'd say it's nearly maxed out, considering that most of the older southern Democrats have finally come over to the Republican side.
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Old 05-05-2013, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,037,374 times
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I think Kansas is as conservative as it is because it's state politics are dominated by rural interests and there are no metropolitan centers large enough to balance it out. The Kansas City metro is concentrated on the Missouri side, and Wichita, the only other sizable population center in the state, is pretty conservative. Most of the educated young professionals end up moving out of state. Oklahoma suffers from the same problem.
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Old 05-06-2013, 01:26 AM
 
Location: Augusta GA
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Actually, there are suburban liberal white areas in the south, just not many and not in the deep south. You can find them in NOVA, South Florida, and Raleigh Durham. Other than those, not many other suburban places in the south do (I don't really consider Decatur GA a suburb in the traditional sense, it feels more like an urban extension of the city).
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Old 05-06-2013, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedudewiththeplan View Post
Actually, there are suburban liberal white areas in the south, just not many and not in the deep south. You can find them in NOVA, South Florida, and Raleigh Durham. Other than those, not many other suburban places in the south do (I don't really consider Decatur GA a suburb in the traditional sense, it feels more like an urban extension of the city).
All those areas are full of northern transplants. Whites aren't really liberal there either - they just vote like whites vote in the North (somewhere from 40% to 60% Democratic), rather than how whites vote these days in the South (somewhere from 70% to 90% Republican).

Although it's partially a result of gerrymandering, discounting majority Black or Latino congressional seats, and the three areas you mentioned, there are only two congressional seats in the South that Obama carried. They are KY-03 (Louisville), and TN-05 (Nashville). Louisville has, unlike the deep south, something of a strong organized labor tradition. Nashville is actually somewhere a lot of southern liberals (as opposed to transplants) congregate due to involvement in the music industry (Country musicians might be more conservative than most professional musicians, but they tend to be more liberal than their fan base, and Nashville has the highest number of musicians per capita of anywhere in the U.S.)
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Old 05-06-2013, 10:19 AM
 
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On the urban/rural divide, true in New Jersey and flipped in Wisconsin.

In New Jersey, even "Suburban" counties are split. Monmouth County votes red because of its wealth and because it is on a whole, more rural than urban. Middlesex County is also a "suburban" county in New Jersey, but it votes blue because it is more urban than rural, but has rich areas, too.

Eastern Wisconsin (more urban) votes red, while western Wisconsin (more rural) votes blue.
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Old 05-06-2013, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Augusta GA
880 posts, read 2,529,128 times
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Having transplants does factor in but places like Raleigh Durham also have a strong liberal history due to the university presence. Suburbs like Hillsboro and Pittsboro are quite liberal in most every way (support for gay marriage, use of biofuels and alternative energy, prevalence of co-ops and farmers markets, ect...) And areas like Alexandria and Arlington VA are quite liberal by southern standards as well. As I mentioned, they are not common, and they may not be on the same level as west coast liberals, but they do exist. I did not mention areas like Covington KY because even though it is majority white and democrat, I believe that this has more to due with blue collar pro-union sentiment than anything else.
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Old 05-06-2013, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MUTGR View Post
Kansas voters are very enlightened then. Texas is doing great while Iowa, not so much.
But Kansas isn't. Hmm.
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Old 05-06-2013, 06:32 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,927,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MUTGR View Post
Kansas voters are very enlightened then. Texas is doing great while Iowa, not so much.
No one is moving to Kansas. Net out-migration is very strong and the only reason the population is increasing is due to the very very high birth rate. Kansas saw negative job growth like Iowa between 2000-2010 with no comparisons to Texas job growth during that time period.
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Old 05-06-2013, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,225,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedudewiththeplan View Post
Having transplants does factor in but places like Raleigh Durham also have a strong liberal history due to the university presence. Suburbs like Hillsboro and Pittsboro are quite liberal in most every way (support for gay marriage, use of biofuels and alternative energy, prevalence of co-ops and farmers markets, ect...) And areas like Alexandria and Arlington VA are quite liberal by southern standards as well. As I mentioned, they are not common, and they may not be on the same level as west coast liberals, but they do exist. I did not mention areas like Covington KY because even though it is majority white and democrat, I believe that this has more to due with blue collar pro-union sentiment than anything else.
Covington, Alexandria, and Arlington really are not Southern. Covington is Midwestern, and Alexandria and Arlington are far more Northeastern than Southern.
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