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Old 05-01-2013, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Columbia, MD
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Albuquerque
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Old 05-01-2013, 04:16 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
The problem with looking at relative humidity as a percentage is that is says nothing about temperature, which is usually what makes it feel humid or not. 70% humidity at 75 degrees is far different than 70% humidity at 90 degrees. Dewpoints are a better way to look at humidity as it gives you an idea of how hot and humid it is and essentially how comfortable it is.
Agreed. Usually when people talk about how humid it feels or how sticky a place feels they are referring to absolute humidity, or dew point, not relative humidity. Relative humidity goes drastically up and down as the day warms and cools, dew point stays roughly the same unless a new air mass arrives. Take a look at this dew point map:

http://docs.lib.noaa.gov/rescue/mwr/...93-02-0113.pdf

July dew points are on page 118

Most people find the air noticeably humid once the dew point reaches 60F. Except the northernmost part of the country, the 60F dew point line is at near 101W. To the west, the dew point drops quickly, into levels that are obviously dry for summer. To the east, the dew point gradually increases to sticky level, except for the northernmost parts of the country again. Annual precipitation follows a somewhat similar pattern:

http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/pcpn/us_precip.gif

In the north, there's a gradual decrease of precipitation west of the Appalachians. In the south, west of the Mississippi. The precipitation drastically starts to drop to semi-arid around 96W, depending on latitude. In the interior eastern US, much of the moisture and precipitation comes from the Gulf of Mexico. As weather (or at least storms) generally come from the west, west of the westernmost end of the Gulf of Mexico, it becomes much drier.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'm glad you posted this. In general, the 100th meridian is the dividing line between the humid part of the country to the east and the drier west. The 100th runs through Cozad, Nebraska, not Indianapolis. Even Omaha is humid.
See above.
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Old 05-01-2013, 06:13 PM
 
Location: SoCal
1,243 posts, read 1,571,203 times
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Seattle? It has all seasons and last I checked the summers aren't muggy or uncomfortable.
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Old 05-01-2013, 07:30 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,013 posts, read 102,621,396 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Agreed. Usually when people talk about how humid it feels or how sticky a place feels they are referring to absolute humidity, or dew point, not relative humidity. Relative humidity goes drastically up and down as the day warms and cools, dew point stays roughly the same unless a new air mass arrives. Take a look at this dew point map:

http://docs.lib.noaa.gov/rescue/mwr/...93-02-0113.pdf

July dew points are on page 118

Most people find the air noticeably humid once the dew point reaches 60F. Except the northernmost part of the country, the 60F dew point line is at near 101W. To the west, the dew point drops quickly, into levels that are obviously dry for summer. To the east, the dew point gradually increases to sticky level, except for the northernmost parts of the country again. Annual precipitation follows a somewhat similar pattern:

http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/pcpn/us_precip.gif

In the north, there's a gradual decrease of precipitation west of the Appalachians. In the south, west of the Mississippi. The precipitation drastically starts to drop to semi-arid around 96W, depending on latitude. In the interior eastern US, much of the moisture and precipitation comes from the Gulf of Mexico. As weather (or at least storms) generally come from the west, west of the westernmost end of the Gulf of Mexico, it becomes much drier.




See above.
So I say 100 and you say 101. Is that a huge difference?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cozad,_Nebraska
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Old 05-01-2013, 08:09 PM
 
7,385 posts, read 13,238,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Wow...I would have never thought that cities like San Diego, Seattle, Cleveland, Detroit, Milwaukee, Chicago, and several others were more humid than Atlanta. You would think from comments on this site that Atlanta weather is some of the most humid in the U.S.
It depends on when you're looking at. Summer in Seattle? No humidity, in fact it's very dry. But come winter, it's full-on humidity with the cold.
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Old 05-01-2013, 08:55 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
So I say 100 and you say 101. Is that a huge difference?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cozad,_Nebraska
No, of course not. I saw about 101, and then around 97 for the precipitation. Check the links!
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Old 05-01-2013, 08:56 PM
 
6,611 posts, read 6,930,504 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkpoe View Post
It depends on when you're looking at. Summer in Seattle? No humidity, in fact it's very dry. But come winter, it's full-on humidity with the cold.
...and pretty much the opposite in Atlanta.
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Old 05-01-2013, 10:06 PM
 
2,665 posts, read 4,877,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
haven't you learned yet????? Indianapolis is the answer to every question.
lol IKR
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Old 05-01-2013, 10:12 PM
 
2,665 posts, read 4,877,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MB8abovetherim View Post
Seattle? It has all seasons and last I checked the summers aren't muggy or uncomfortable.
more like two seasons
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Old 05-01-2013, 10:13 PM
 
2,665 posts, read 4,877,578 times
Reputation: 844
in other words, all the cool major cities dont have this weather, a damn shame
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