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Old 05-04-2013, 08:01 PM
 
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In Atlanta...Historic Midtown, Inman Park, Grant Park, West End. Smaller lot sizes, homes closer together and walkable with small apartment buildings and commercial areas mixed in. I don't know if these are "typical" since each city is different, but from my experiences in southern cities they seem to be.

Last edited by JoeTarheel; 05-04-2013 at 08:12 PM..

 
Old 05-04-2013, 08:09 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
In Atlanta...Historic Midtown, Inman Park, Grant Park, West End
Checking a density map, cities like Worcester, MA or Providence, RI are similar in density and size to the core of Atlanta, even though they're much smaller. The gap between northern and southern cities is fairly large.

Mapping the 2010 U.S. Census - NYTimes.com
 
Old 05-04-2013, 08:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
I can see your point, but are downtown Memphis and Richmond etc. all that big or dense? I don't think so, not in comparison.
I think the sizes of their downtowns are more in proportion to the size cities they are. Their downtowns are fairly historic and somewhat dense overall and are at least the size of Atlanta's historic urban core.
 
Old 05-04-2013, 08:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I think the sizes of their downtowns are more in proportion to the size cities they are. Their downtowns are fairly historic and somewhat dense overall and are at least the size of Atlanta's historic urban core.
They are not the size of Atlanta's urban core...downtown Atlanta is much larger, but I don't want to continue arguing about it. We obviously see this cities differently.
 
Old 05-04-2013, 08:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Checking a density map, cities like Worcester, MA or Providence, RI are similar in density and size to the core of Atlanta, even though they're much smaller. The gap between northern and southern cities is fairly large.

Mapping the 2010 U.S. Census - NYTimes.com
Hmmm..how did that pertain to my post?
 
Old 05-04-2013, 08:21 PM
 
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Naa we don't have any city's here in the south.

http://i040.radikal.ru/0807/6f/dad18f47ab97.jpg

From this CD thread.

We just don't like living on top of other people much.

Last edited by JMT; 05-05-2013 at 10:37 AM..
 
Old 05-04-2013, 08:31 PM
 
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
To people with knowledge of the south - can you post me some pictures of classic southern urban neighborhoods? I don't mean things like business districts, but residential areas. I'm familiar with a few (like Cabbagetown), but I don't know how indicative they are of the southern urban residential fabric.

I'm not saying this because I want people to "prove" anything to me. But some posters have indicated there's more out there than shotgun houses and near estates, so I'd like to see what people are talking about.
Just a few off the top of my head:

Elmwood Park, Columbia, SC:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=shand...12,180,,0,-0.1

Olde Town, Augusta, GA:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Olde+...,244.27,,0,0.1

Dilworth, Charlotte, NC:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Dilwo...2,83.77,,0,1.1

Jackson Ward, Richmond, VA:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Jacks...12,271.09,,0,0

And there are plenty more.
 
Old 05-04-2013, 08:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
They are not the size of Atlanta's urban core...downtown Atlanta is much larger, but I don't want to continue arguing about it. We obviously see this cities differently.
I said they are at least the size of Atlanta's historic urban core--meaning the most historic part of downtown proper. I was very specific.
 
Old 05-04-2013, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Just a few off the top of my head:
To my own (subjective, northern) eyes, the Richmond neighborhood is certainly urban. The Augusta neighborhood is somewhat urban. The Columbia and Charlotte neighborhoods, not really at all. I do recognize the main difference between the Augusta example and the latter two is the Augusta one has a lot less trees though, which helps to see the density of the area is actually fairly high. Still, all three look like streetcar suburbs. I recognize the architecture is pre-WW2 (and I think near Victorian in some cases), but the wide setback from the street, large levels of greenery, and space between the houses all comes across as semi-suburb, despite the use of tight street grids.
 
Old 05-05-2013, 12:21 AM
 
Location: New Orleans
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
To my own (subjective, northern) eyes, the Richmond neighborhood is certainly urban. The Augusta neighborhood is somewhat urban. The Columbia and Charlotte neighborhoods, not really at all. I do recognize the main difference between the Augusta example and the latter two is the Augusta one has a lot less trees though, which helps to see the density of the area is actually fairly high. Still, all three look like streetcar suburbs. I recognize the architecture is pre-WW2 (and I think near Victorian in some cases), but the wide setback from the street, large levels of greenery, and space between the houses all comes across as semi-suburb, despite the use of tight street grids.
I think most Southern cities older neighborhoods are going to be from that streetcar suburb era since that was when a lot of these cities started to develop and grow more. The cities that have those more urban neighborhoods are most likely going to be the ones that had decent sized population in the 19th century which includes the usual suspects like Charleston, Savannah, New Orleans, Richmond, Louisville, and maybe a few others.

Here is a streetview in Houston that has a more urban appearance but the surrounding neighborhood has a lot of empty lots and newer infill.
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Houston,+TX&hl=en&ll=29.755759,-95.382363&spn=0.003431,0.005284&sll=41.50008,-81.688152&sspn=0.008373,0.021136&oq=hou&t=h&hnear= Houston,+Harris,+Texas&layer=c&cbll=29.755759,-95.382363&panoid=fAOxwriLgd2fR9T0sAxx9Q&cbp=12,39. 52,,0,4.2&z=18
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