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Old 05-17-2013, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,227,706 times
Reputation: 998

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supine View Post
Could it be KC partly due to its regional location has a unique blend of Southern and Midwestern culture? Asking that by neither placing one culture above or below the other.

If KC does have that blend then that might be a unique quality to it that it should be proud of.
KC does not have a blend of Southern and Midwestern culture. It is a Midwestern city with a "touch" of Southern culture. It is not a Midwest-South hybrid. If you want to believe that fine. You and Bluefox are crazy to think that KC is anywhere close to half-Southern. KC is on top of the Midwest-South transition zone. South of KC, the transition zone to the South begins. KC is on the southern edge of the cultural Midwest.
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Old 05-17-2013, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,227,706 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
I agree with that. It's not like the Midwest, South, East Coast, West Coast, etc. are different countries. The Midwest was defined by the Census Bureau, not the gospel. There are going to be cities that exhibit characteristics that may not fall completely in line with what people think are endemic to the region and I don't see anything inherently wrong with that.
KC is not a blend of Southern and Midwestern. Period. It may have touches of Southern culture. But that's it. KC is a solidly Midwestern city. It does not belong in the same region as Dallas before Chicago.
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Old 05-17-2013, 02:57 PM
 
2,200 posts, read 2,319,213 times
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KC is 100% midwestern. It's like an archetype of "midwestern city".

The only southern influence is the same Great Migration legacy most larger midwestern cities have, and there's probably less of that in KC than in the former industrial powerhouse cities of the region.

There is some degree of rural influence that is more pronounced than it is in other, larger or historically larger cities, but there's not much that's more "midwestern" than the idea of rurality, and especially the phenomenon of rural and small town transplants to a city.
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Old 05-17-2013, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Lake View, Chicago
174 posts, read 441,709 times
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I would say the biggest differences between the plains and the lakes can definitely be seen through political differences, and can give you insight to exactly what is plains, what is lakes, and what is Dixie. The lakes have huge union influence that has made the region famous for the blue collar Union Democrat. This is especially prevelant in Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Iowa is often considered an adopte Great Lakes state because it also has a large union population (and is voting Democrat). There is also a noticeable humanist, rights-oriented liberal stereotype that is like a Midwesternized version of the California hippie. This type is most prevelant in Minneapolis, Madison WI, and parts of Chicago. Indiana is often considered to be adopted by the south because of its rampant conservatism and its major city being fairly moderate despite leaning left (many of the Great Lakes cities are 80+% Democrat in elections and Indianapolis is 60% or less, typically).

I think most people consider Missouri to be a southern state, with STL being an exception and a part of the lakes states. KC's politics are similar to Dallas' and I feel like that definitely puts them in the SW category.
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Old 05-17-2013, 10:05 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,995 posts, read 102,568,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenbay33 View Post
Yep, totally. Just look at who they just elected Mayor Seriously Omaha is split down the middle. The West is mostly moderate Republicans, while East Omaha is mostly democratic, but hardly liberal.
I don't follow Omaha politics closely, b/c I'm not from there. However, the bold is why I said "Democrat", not "liberal". DH is from East Omaha, a couple blocks east of the 72nd St. demarcation line anyway.
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Old 05-17-2013, 10:21 PM
 
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I grew up in Omaha, and, while there were a lot of Democrats, the city never had the liberal vibe...not always a bad thing.
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Old 05-18-2013, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,227,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoBurbs View Post
I think most people consider Missouri to be a southern state, with STL being an exception and a part of the lakes states. KC's politics are similar to Dallas' and I feel like that definitely puts them in the SW category.
You are so wrong it's hilarious. Most people consider Missouri to be a Southern state? Are you NUTS?!!!! What on earth gave you that idea? THe majority of Missourians consider themselves Midwesterners...a minority of people would call it the South. KC and STL are solidly Midwestern cities. KC's politics are not at all similar to Dallas. KC and Dallas are not at all similar in terms of politics, nor are they similar culturally or linguistically. You have never been to these cities if you think that. Missouri is NOT a Southern state, and if most people considered it to be a Southern state, you'd see that on here and everywhere else. But nobody does. I think most people would consider you to be WRONG. KC's politics similar to Dallas? HA!!! KC is moderate to liberal...it has voted blue consistently in the past several elections. Dallas is conservative.

You know what? Since you think KC is like Dallas, I think Chicago is like Nashville. And most people consider Illinois to be a Southern state. That is the extent to which your reasoning does not make sense. You are so wrong about Missouri and Kansas City it's hilarious...most people consider them Southern...what the hell have you been smoking. And even KC is politically similar, POLITICS define regions solely? It's my humble opinion that you need to know exactly where you are in the time space continuum.

Last edited by stlouisan; 05-18-2013 at 10:25 AM..
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Old 05-18-2013, 10:56 PM
 
Location: IN
20,847 posts, read 35,942,861 times
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Major Differences between the Great Plains and Great Lakes regions:

1) The Great Plains region is the gateway to the West region, meaning the further west you go the less similarities it has with the Midwest.
2) Climate. The climate of the Great Plains region is entirely different than the central and eastern portions of the Midwest. Precipitation is not reliable at all, drought cycles tend to be frequent, and humidity values tend to be much lower. Few trees grow naturally in many areas of the Plains outside the protected river and stream corridors. Much more irrigation dependent for growing crops to feed the massive commercial ag industry that tends to be concentrated in select towns. The rest of the crops grown are dryland.
3) Farm and Ranch size: The Great Plains tends to have much larger farm and ranch size acreage overall. Entire land sections in the thousands of acres are not uncommon at all with some higher acreage amounts prevalent as well. The Great Lakes tends to have a much greater quantity of farms with far less in the way of ranches on much smaller acerage. Orchards and fruit farms tend to be much more common in the Great Lakes region and very rare the further west you go in the Great Plains. Farms, orchards, and forests tend to be mixed together in the Great Lakes region, particularly in the northern tier below the Northwoods.
4) Population Density: The rural counties in the core of the Midwest and Great Lakes regions tend to have population densities that are very similar to rural counties in the rest of the states in the eastern half of the country. Many of these rural counties in the region are not completely agriculturally dependent and have a bit more economic diversification, often light industry, manufacturing, healthcare, etc. The population densities for the Great Plains counties are quite low by comparison with many falling into "frontier status," meaning fewer than 7 people per square mile. The Great Plains counties are very similar to much of the rural West due the inherent nature of the low population density, greater isolation from larger population centers, and less economic diversification related to other two points.
5) Geographic Influences and Cultural Pull: The Great Plains region tends to be pulled in two opposite directions. The southern portion of the region has a substantial influence from the southwest and Texas while the Dakotas tend to have more influence from the Twin Cities outside of the Energy Patch region that attracts people from many different areas seeking work. Politically the Great Plains region is substantially more conservative than much of the central and eastern portions of the Midwest, both socially and economically. This is partially due to the fact that the Great Plains region is more culturally isolated and outside the mainstream of what would be considered typical by many in the US. It is a rural culture, but much of the populace lives in metropolitan cities, so the cities retain that rural culture. The Great Lakes cities tend to have far less rural influences within the city environs, even though they still act as a magnet that attracts human capital from the smaller cities and rural areas regionally, nationally, and internationally.
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