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Old 05-07-2013, 09:36 PM
 
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First of all, are Iowa and Missouri Great Plains states? I don't really see them as on the Great Plains. To me the Great Plains states are the Dakotas, Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Texas, and Eastern New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming and Montana. Iowa is a prairie state as is most of Missouri.

That being said, to me the area from Central Nebraska and Kansas and South Dakota until Central Illinois seems very similar to me. Corn is the main crop. Most of the manufacturing is farm based (such as tractors or semi trailers) in the smaller towns while the cities seem to be very similar. To me, Kansas City and Omaha are extremely similar, and Des Moines seems to be too. A lot of the smaller cities seem pretty simiar too such as Sioux City, Topeka, Lincoln, Sioux Falls, Cedar Rapids and Springfield IL. Telemarketing is also big in these cities. Politically though it is mixed, though most rural areas are conservative while most of the cities lean somewhat left
Minneapolis also seems similar to KC, though culturally i think it probably fits more with Chicago and Milwaukee even though its not really part of the Rust Belt. Saint Louis fits more with Chicago and the Eastern Cities too. Its like a rust belt colony in Southern Illinois and Missouri. Anyway, From Central Illinois on East it seems more manufacturing based and than involved with farming. Omaha and Kansas City and Des Moines are proud of their agricultural roots. While Chicago is a big trading Center in Agriculture as is Minneapolis, to me they aren't farming type cities. Minneapolis is more of a artsy type town while Chicago is the New York of the Midwest. Saint Louis also tries to seem more cultured than Kansas City and is less ag focused (though KC has a great art scene).
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Old 05-07-2013, 09:43 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
As with many things, I don't think the states perfectly capture the political boundaries.

Much of the "great lakes" states, for example, are plains. The most productive corn/wheat farming in the U.S. runs in a band through Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana, for example.

Similarly, some Midwestern states show big east-west differences. For example, Western Iowa (dunno if you'd call it Great Plains or Great Lakes), is very moderately Republican while Eastern Iowa is moderately Democratic. The same split is more or less seen in Minnesota, where the western part of the state is very similar to the Dakotas in terms of farming, language, and politics. In contrast, in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska, the easternmost portions are fairly moderately Republican, while the western half is incredibly Republican.

Most of the political differences, though, come down to the Great Plains lacking major cities, while most Great Lakes states have them. Indiana is more Republican than the other states around the Great Lakes in part because Indianapolis isn't as big as Chicago, Detroit, Minneapolis-St Paul, or Milwaukee, and hence doesn't drown out the rural areas as much.
B#1: No, Iowa isn't a Great Lakes state; it does not border a Great Lake. Its eastern border is the Mississippi River.

Indy has almost 1 million people. It's way bigger than M-SP or Milwaukee.
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Old 05-07-2013, 09:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
B#1: No, Iowa isn't a Great Lakes state; it does not border a Great Lake. Its eastern border is the Mississippi River.

Indy has almost 1 million people. It's way bigger than M-SP or Milwaukee.
Indy metro has far fewer people than MSP. I don't know about Milwaukee....think it's about the same size.

If you're talking city limits, Indy's 800,000+ hardly qualifies as "way bigger" than Milwaukee (600,000+), or Minneapolis and St. Paul put together (670,000+)...
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Old 05-08-2013, 10:19 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by srsmn View Post
Indy metro has far fewer people than MSP. I don't know about Milwaukee....think it's about the same size.

If you're talking city limits, Indy's 800,000+ hardly qualifies as "way bigger" than Milwaukee (600,000+), or Minneapolis and St. Paul put together (670,000+)...
Milwaukee's city pop is actually just under 600,000 (594,883 in 2010). Indy's is 820,445 for the same count. Indy's population is about 25% larger. I'd call that "way bigger". Minneapolis and St. Paul together are 672,889. Indy is still about 20% larger. M/SP has the largest metro, 3,300,000. Milwaukee and Indy have about the same MSA pop; 1,555,000 and 1,778,000 respectively.
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:46 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Urban area population (continuously built up area with some commute threshold) is the best population comparison IMO. In the Midwest it's:

1) Chicago, 8.6 million
2) Detroit, 3.7 million
3) Minneapolis / St. Paul, 2.7 million
4) St. Louis, 2.2 million
5) Cleveland, 1.8 million
6) Cincinnati, 1.6 million
7) Kansas City, 1.5 million
8) Indianopolis, 1.5 million
9) Milwaukee, 1.4 million
10) Columbus, 1.4 million

List of United States urban areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The rest are all smaller than 1 million
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Old 05-08-2013, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,225,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanox View Post
Kansas City actually doesn't have anything in common with anything that exists in the 3-Dimensional world AT ALL.
You obviously don't know what you're talking about if you think Kansas City is anything BUT a West Coast-Deep Southern Mountain West/Pacific Northwest Desert/Jamaican-Russian hybrid city. Kansas City's location was strategically placed OUTSIDE OF THE MIDWEST CORE so that no one IN THE MIDWEST CORE would have to lay claim to being associated with it. The in-migration patterns of Kansas City also has nothing in common with THE MIDWEST CORE. Lately, the entire populations or Arizona, Texas, Colorado, and every state to the SOUTH AND WEST of Kansas City have been moving into the southern portion of Johnson County. Again, these migration patterns will DRASTICALLY ALTER KANSAS CITY'S NON-MIDWESTERN CORE CULTURE FURTHER SEPERATING IT FROM THE MIDWEST CORE, THE MIDWEST, AND THE ENTIRE COUNTRY OF THE UNITED STATES. Furthermore, the CLIMATE of the MIDWEST CORE is absolutely nothing like Kansas City in relation to the amount of annual precipitation Kansas City recieves COMPARED TO THE MIDWEST CORE

Average Annual Precipitation by City in the US - Current Results

We can easily see that even though Kansas City recieves more precipitation than CORE MIDWESTERN CITIES like Cleveland, Detroit, and even Chicago, THE ANGLE OF THE SUN IN THE SUMMER AND WINTER SOLSTICE CREATES A VASTLY DIFFERENT CLIMATE IN KANSAS CITY COMPARED TO THE MIDWEST CORE. Kansas City HAS A CLIMATE OF A SUNBELT DENVER-DALLAS HYBRID that is not even remotely similar to anything in THE MIDWEST CORE.

Kansas City also has nothing in common with THE MIDWEST CORE in terms of it's suburban sprawl. CITIES IN THE MIDWEST CORE don't even have suburbs, everyone lives in an urban setting in red brick rowhomes and skyscrapers. AGAIN, THIS SEPERATES KANSAS CITY FROM THE ACTUAL MIDWEST AND MIDWEST CORE. NONE OF THE CORE MIDWESTERN CITIES HAVE SUBURBAN SPRAWL IN ANYWAY.

I have lurked this forum for 7 years and in my time doing so, I have never seen a person with such a bias against Kansas City as you, GraniteStater. You alienate Kansas City from it's own region and make it out to be nothing like anything that is your hysterical idea of the nonexistant "midwest core." I was born in Chicago, grew up in Kansas City and moved back here for my job and honestly, Kansas City felt more like Chicago than Minneapolis, Des Moines, and even Duluth, the times that I lived in those cities (I might add that I only have lived in the urban cores of the cities listed, including KC). I honestly do not know if you're delusional about Kansas City or if you're just being really insecure about your own hometown.
I don't think Kansas City is that different from Omaha, Des Moines, or Minneapolis. Apart from the winter, in which Omaha is obviously colder and snowier, KC and Omaha have pretty similar climates. Midwest core cities don't have suburban sprawl? Take a look at Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, and St. Louis. Anyway, I agree with much of this post. To me though, KC is a "Western Midwest" city...and to say the Western Midwest cities have nothing in common with the Great Lakes cities is just wrong.
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Old 05-08-2013, 03:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Most of the residents of the largest cities in the Great Plains also look to the cities in the West and Southwest moreson than any in the Great Lakes region and the core of the Midwest. Also, look at migration trends. Many from the Great Plains states tend to move to states further south and west as well. They are more likely to take vacations to those same states and know far less about the Great Lakes states, most eastern states, and the Northwoods/North Country.
Absolutely--I found that my midwestern co-workers at the time preferred to take vacations, or relocate to, areas south and west of where they resided. The East Coast didn't have much attractiveness to them..

In any case, the basic difference between the Great Lakes states and The Great Plains states lies in the lack of industry on the Great Plains; both groups have considerable agriculture ( more corn/soybeans for the former, more wheat and cattle for the latter, etc), but the lack of a manufacturing base ( other than farm-related stuff) is obvious..
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Old 05-08-2013, 03:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The built environment of KC couldn't be more different than cities like Chicago or St. Louis as KC is a heavily suburban metropolitan city with an extreme car culture with everything being so spread out. KC has the most highway lane miles per capita of any metro area in the US.
Care to guess the city with the 2nd most highway miles per capita?

Hint: It's one of the other 2 you just mentioned, but not Chicago...

Also in the top 10: Cleveland, Columbus, Pittsburgh, Baltimore and Providence.
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Old 05-08-2013, 03:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by srsmn View Post
Minneapolis has a heck of a lot more in common with Milwaukee or Cleveland than it does with KC.
No. Of those 3, KC and Minneapolis are probably the MOST similar.

Quote:
Indianapolis has a heck of a lot more in common with KC than it does with Chicago or Cincinnati, which are both much closer.
Yes. Indianapolis and KC have a great deal in common.
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Old 05-08-2013, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,310,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
You are absolutely right that "KC faces West." This is definitely true as KC has more influences from the Great Plains region overall and its social norms and culture than the core of the Midwest eastward. The built environment of KC couldn't be more different than cities like Chicago or St. Louis as KC is a heavily suburban metropolitan city with an extreme car culture with everything being so spread out. KC has the most highway lane miles per capita of any metro area in the US. Having grown up and lived in the KC metro area for many years I can tell you for a fact that KC residents are more inclined to travel to Colorado, California, Texas, or Florida more often than Chicagoland, the Northwest, Minneapolis, or anywhere in the eastern US.
KC is 6.5-7.0 hours drive to Minneapolis......it shouldn't be THAT far off their radar. It's closer than Denver, anyways. I agree though that culturally KC is much more "Western-facing".
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