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Old 05-08-2013, 08:55 PM
 
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I would say Iowa and Minnesota are split down in two. Growing up in Iowa it seemed politically and socially everything from Des Moines and east was more "great lakes" culture and faced towards the east. Everything west of Des Moines seemed more "great plains" and faced to the west/plains. The topography changes as well, and the population density drops off greatly. Same with Minnesota with the Twin Cities and east/south of their being more "great lakes", blue politically, etc.

Des Moines-Ames-Cedar Rapids-Dubuque-Iowa City-Quad Cities-Waterloo arch in central to eastern Iowa has 1,850,000 in metro populations, while western Iowa has hardly anything except the Omaha area (I know it's in Nebraska) and Sioux City.

If you look at a county map of the election its extremely split, with western being very red, and eastern being very blue, even the rural counties.
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Old 05-09-2013, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,277 posts, read 4,156,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Aren't the Great Lakes more blue-dog Democrats anyways than your wine and cheese San Francisco or Seattle liberals? If so, wouldn't that make a difference in the overall political vibe?

The Great Plains doesn't really have any major cities unless you want to include Texas as a Great Plains state. Technically Denver is on the western boundary and Kansas City is on the eastern boundary but both are more associated with the Mountain West and Midwest respectively than the Great Plains.
Yes with the exception of Columbus and Minneapolis. They are both more progressive in the west coast way. Many are surprised to learn this of Columbus but it's not a liberal in the old school way. It leans progressive. While I think Minneapolis even more so.
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Old 05-09-2013, 12:58 PM
 
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There is a pretty significant difference between liberal and reliably democrat. Apparently that is lost on some posters.
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Old 05-09-2013, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
I was thinking more in terms of density. Dallas (3518 ppsqm) and Kansas City (1471 ppsqm) are more similar than Chicago (11,864 ppsqm). Not talking about metro, just city here. KC and Dallas are also more similar to each other with regard to public transportation, walkability, etc. than either is to Chicago.

Regarding metro area, there are much larger cities in the KC metro area, similar to Dallas (i.e. Fort Worth). Chicago is far and away the largest city, and the next ones are pretty much farther flung suburbs in the low 100k populations, literally a small fraction of the size of Chicago. There are just bigger cities in the Metroplex (Fort Worth, Arlington, Plano) and the KC Metro (Overland Park, Kansas City, KS) above and beyond the anchor cities themselves than there are in Chicago.

Culturally, linguistically, okay I could see the similarities to Chicago, historically speaking. Would even also say maybe in terms of architecture.

However, not sure what makes Kansas City more demographically similar to Chicago than Dallas. All three have similar black populations, but both Chicago and Dallas have far bigger Hispanic populations than KC, and much smaller non-Hispanic white populations.
You really are a one-dimensional type of person. Kansas City has more Catholics for starters, as does Chicago. There's the start of your demographic similarities.
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Old 05-09-2013, 09:40 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
I would say Iowa and Minnesota are split down in two. Growing up in Iowa it seemed politically and socially everything from Des Moines and east was more "great lakes" culture and faced towards the east. Everything west of Des Moines seemed more "great plains" and faced to the west/plains. The topography changes as well, and the population density drops off greatly. Same with Minnesota with the Twin Cities and east/south of their being more "great lakes", blue politically, etc.

Des Moines-Ames-Cedar Rapids-Dubuque-Iowa City-Quad Cities-Waterloo arch in central to eastern Iowa has 1,850,000 in metro populations, while western Iowa has hardly anything except the Omaha area (I know it's in Nebraska) and Sioux City.

If you look at a county map of the election its extremely split, with western being very red, and eastern being very blue, even the rural counties.
Omaha is a Democratic (Big D) city.
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Old 05-09-2013, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,050,141 times
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Originally Posted by streetcreed View Post
Yes with the exception of Columbus and Minneapolis. They are both more progressive in the west coast way. Many are surprised to learn this of Columbus but it's not a liberal in the old school way. It leans progressive. While I think Minneapolis even more so.
I knew that about Minneapolis, which is why it is fast joining in the ranks with Portland, Seattle, and Austin.

Interesting to learn that about Columbus though. I would have expected it to be more of a blue-dog liberal city.
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Old 05-09-2013, 10:07 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
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Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
You really are a one-dimensional type of person. Kansas City has more Catholics for starters, as does Chicago. There's the start of your demographic similarities.
Was there really a need to launch a personal attack? If you think comparing cities based on density and racial/ethnic demographics is one-dimensional, fine. But for you to make the giant leap from that to a conclusion that I am one-dimensional as a person undoubtedly says more about you than it does about me.

At any rate, I stand by what I said. Chicago and Kansas City may share similarities in some regards. But there are any number of criteria by which you could base whether two cities are similar or different in terms of culture, which is in itself somewhat of an abstract term. Food, nightlife, ethnic neighborhoods, etc. And yes, I do think that density, public transportation, and race/ethnicity are also weighty factors by which one may compare how cities are shaped from a cultural perspective, as bizarre as that may sound. And Kansas City and Chicago are very different in those regards.

Last edited by Bluefox; 05-09-2013 at 10:29 PM..
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Old 05-09-2013, 10:25 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
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Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Kansas City has more Catholics for starters, as does Chicago. .
And for what it's worth, according to our very own city-data.com, Chicago's Catholic population is 69%, while KC's is 30% and Dallas's is 39%. KC and Dallas both have much larger Protestant populations than Chicago. I wonder which two cities are more similar in that regard?

http://www.city-data.com/city/Chicago-Illinois.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/Kansas-City-Missouri.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/Dallas-Texas.html

Religion stats towards the bottom half of each page.
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Old 05-10-2013, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,230,104 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
Was there really a need to launch a personal attack? If you think comparing cities based on density and racial/ethnic demographics is one-dimensional, fine. But for you to make the giant leap from that to a conclusion that I am one-dimensional as a person undoubtedly says more about you than it does about me.

At any rate, I stand by what I said. Chicago and Kansas City may share similarities in some regards. But there are any number of criteria by which you could base whether two cities are similar or different in terms of culture, which is in itself somewhat of an abstract term. Food, nightlife, ethnic neighborhoods, etc. And yes, I do think that density, public transportation, and race/ethnicity are also weighty factors by which one may compare how cities are shaped from a cultural perspective, as bizarre as that may sound. And Kansas City and Chicago are very different in those regards.
I was speaking in terms of how you use two general characteristics to make two cities different. Example: NYC and Boston have different densities and racial demographics, but are they both not part of the Northeast? Both KC and Chicago are Midwestern. You are trying to make them out to be in two different regions. THey may be in two different subregions, but are undebatably a part of the same region. To say KC has more in common with Dallas culturally, linguistically, and demographically than Chicago is a flat-out lie, and you know it.
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Old 05-10-2013, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,230,104 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
And for what it's worth, according to our very own city-data.com, Chicago's Catholic population is 69%, while KC's is 30% and Dallas's is 39%. KC and Dallas both have much larger Protestant populations than Chicago. I wonder which two cities are more similar in that regard?

http://www.city-data.com/city/Chicago-Illinois.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/Kansas-City-Missouri.html
http://www.city-data.com/city/Dallas-Texas.html

Religion stats towards the bottom half of each page.
Here's the difference...Dallas' Catholicism is likely due to a large Hispanic population, which is 42.4%, like much of Texas. KC's Catholicism comes primarily from its white population (KC is only 10% Hispanic). Boom. That is a HUGE difference. And it completely destroys your demographics.

If you want to believe KC and Dallas are two peas in a pod, believe that. KC and Chicago are more similar in terms of history, industy (meat-packing, blues, etc.) and culture than KC is to Dallas. If you told people in KC they were Southern like Dallas, you'd get stared at. So be a know-nothing and believe KC belongs in the same region as Dallas and not as Chicago. You are truly backwards if you believe that. What you are doing is essentially the same thing as saying that LA has more in common with Miami than with San Francisco, therefore they are more similar and should belong in the same region. Until you can overcome culture and linguistics, your argument of KC being more like Dallas is weak.

Last edited by stlouisan; 05-10-2013 at 09:05 AM..
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