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Old 05-06-2013, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Maryland
4,265 posts, read 5,477,295 times
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Rural northern Wisconsin, if I recall correctly...
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Old 05-06-2013, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Better half of PA
1,391 posts, read 1,041,181 times
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Vermont.
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Old 05-07-2013, 03:51 AM
 
Location: inside your head
149 posts, read 268,168 times
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Thanks for all your answers! I am positively surprised there is so many rural liberal areas in the US.
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Old 05-07-2013, 07:18 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Rural northern New England has gay marriage. Maine by referendum vote, surprising considering its average age is old.
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Old 05-07-2013, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,419 posts, read 11,920,328 times
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Here's a map I did after the 2012 election, attempting to figure out why each county voted for Obama.

Dark blue are urban counties - enough said.

Brown are counties which are either majority-minority, or where Obama's margin was small enough that minority voters alone account for the win.

Pink are counties where there is a major university. This often boosts local performance for Democrats.

Light Green are state capitals. Again, this tends to boost Democratic performance.

Yellow are some counties mostly in the west (especially Colorado), but also in a few places in the east, like Asheville and Key West. These are basically "resort counties" where rich liberals tend to settle to some degree.

Dark red are the rust-belt counties, which run from Upstate NY to Montana. These have concentrations of blue-collar work, and unionization, which again makes them a bit more liberal.

That leaves the three anomalous areas I talked about: New England (extending into central Upstate NY), a swathe of counties around the "driftless area" in the Midwest (plus a few to the northwest of this) and the Pacific Northwest/Northern California. These are colored in gold, orange, and dark green respectively.

If anyone knows something about a county which makes it misclassified, feel free to tell me.
Attached Thumbnails
Areas that are rural and socially liberal?-counties-alt.png  
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Old 05-07-2013, 08:50 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,425 posts, read 18,324,231 times
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Parts of the Big Island on Hawaii

most of Vermont

Western Mass

Taos County, New Mexico

San Juan Islands, WA
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Old 05-07-2013, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Deltana, AK
864 posts, read 1,687,704 times
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Not what the OP was looking for I'm sure, but we have a few relatively left-leaning small towns here in Alaska, though the lines between pot smoking libertarians and gun toting hippies are very blurred here. Tough to tell when everybody wears Carhartts and flannel... But anyway, look into Homer, Girdwood, Talkeetna, Ester (on the outskirts of Fairbanks), or McCarthy if you want REALLY rural..
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Old 05-07-2013, 11:39 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,425 posts, read 18,324,231 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heathen View Post
Not what the OP was looking for I'm sure, but we have a few relatively left-leaning small towns here in Alaska, though the lines between pot smoking libertarians and gun toting hippies are very blurred here. Tough to tell when everybody wears Carhartts and flannel... But anyway, look into Homer, Girdwood, Talkeetna, Ester (on the outskirts of Fairbanks), or McCarthy if you want REALLY rural..
I'll second Homer, AK as it did feel eclectic and full of free spirits. Very beautiful town on a bay surorunded by impressive mountains. Even the most jaded urbanite would be compelled to go fishing there. I caught a 15 pound halibut there and I don't even really like to fish, that day was fun though. Also the little village of Halibut Cove across the bay from Homer was cute, stopped into an art gallery where her work were art canvases done with octopus ink.
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Old 05-07-2013, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
1,704 posts, read 2,762,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Here's a map I did after the 2012 election, attempting to figure out why each county voted for Obama.

Dark blue are urban counties - enough said.

Brown are counties which are either majority-minority, or where Obama's margin was small enough that minority voters alone account for the win.

Pink are counties where there is a major university. This often boosts local performance for Democrats.

Light Green are state capitals. Again, this tends to boost Democratic performance.

Yellow are some counties mostly in the west (especially Colorado), but also in a few places in the east, like Asheville and Key West. These are basically "resort counties" where rich liberals tend to settle to some degree.

Dark red are the rust-belt counties, which run from Upstate NY to Montana. These have concentrations of blue-collar work, and unionization, which again makes them a bit more liberal.

That leaves the three anomalous areas I talked about: New England (extending into central Upstate NY), a swathe of counties around the "driftless area" in the Midwest (plus a few to the northwest of this) and the Pacific Northwest/Northern California. These are colored in gold, orange, and dark green respectively.

If anyone knows something about a county which makes it misclassified, feel free to tell me.
That's a really interesting map, and very informative!
Since you asked...
Johnson Co., IA; Story Co., IA; and Black Hawk Co., IA should all be pink (that's where University of Iowa, Iowa State University, and University of Northern Iowa are, respectively).
Similarly, Linn Co., IA should not be pink.
I would argue that your threshold for "urban counties" is a little high. Omaha, Little Rock, Madison, Des Moines, and even Cedar Rapids all have a an urban-liberal vibe to them. Those are the cities I know best, at least. I could see an argument for Cedar Rapids as rust belt.

Really interesting, though! Very fun to look at.
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Old 05-07-2013, 10:17 PM
 
307 posts, read 468,922 times
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Most small towns I know of with truly liberal progressive scenes are arts colonies, Bisbee AZ, Taos, NM, Marfa, TX. It seems every state or region has an arts town that fits that description.
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