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Old 05-12-2013, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
Chicago: That's another place I was looking at since it's a huge city similar to NYC, but not as expensive. Are the winters pretty bad and how much does rent go for in a good neighborhood?
Depends on what you're used to. Is it cold? Yeah it can get cold. Are there worse cities in the US in the winter? Yes. The average high in January is between 26 and 31 usually and the sun isn't out as much in the winter. However, you won't find many cities better in the summer. There is wind (although the city is not called the windy city 100% because of the wind - NYC is technically a little windier on average). There are people from all over the world living in Chicago though who are originally from very, very hot climates. If you aren't used to it, it takes a little bit to get used to, but it's doable if you know how to dress (no you don't need a parka).

1 bedroom in a good neighborhood is anywhere from say $900-$950/month on upwards. Studios you can get in a good neighborhood for as low as $600-$700/month (some even at $500 but you have to pay for gas which is not cheap) and up.

If you have roommates, you can do pretty well. I know of a few people paying around $500/month with a few roommates. My girlfriend paid $750/month with one roommate just 3 blocks from Wrigley Field...Before that she had a place that was a 7-10 minute train ride away in a great neighborhood and she paid $575/month with one roommate (that's a little under avg for the area but you can probably get a 2 bedroom there for $1400+/month still.)
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Old 05-12-2013, 11:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post

Chicago: That's another place I was looking at since it's a huge city similar to NYC, but not as expensive. Are the winters pretty bad and how much does rent go for in a good neighborhood?
Chicago would be a great choice if your looking for a big city experience with walkable/bikable neighborhoods. Many fun things to do.

You should not have a problem finding a rental in Chicago under 1500 for a one bedroom. Depending on lifestyle, I personally like south Loop. Many recommend Lincoln Park and Lakeview.

The last two winters have not been too bad. The biggest thing for me has been the lack of sunlight in the winter. Not saying that it may not be bad when you move here. The summers make up for it for most people.
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Old 05-12-2013, 06:41 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Depends on what you're used to. Is it cold? Yeah it can get cold. Are there worse cities in the US in the winter? Yes. The average high in January is between 26 and 31 usually and the sun isn't out as much in the winter. However, you won't find many cities better in the summer. There is wind (although the city is not called the windy city 100% because of the wind - NYC is technically a little windier on average). There are people from all over the world living in Chicago though who are originally from very, very hot climates. If you aren't used to it, it takes a little bit to get used to, but it's doable if you know how to dress (no you don't need a parka).

1 bedroom in a good neighborhood is anywhere from say $900-$950/month on upwards. Studios you can get in a good neighborhood for as low as $600-$700/month (some even at $500 but you have to pay for gas which is not cheap) and up.

If you have roommates, you can do pretty well. I know of a few people paying around $500/month with a few roommates. My girlfriend paid $750/month with one roommate just 3 blocks from Wrigley Field...Before that she had a place that was a 7-10 minute train ride away in a great neighborhood and she paid $575/month with one roommate (that's a little under avg for the area but you can probably get a 2 bedroom there for $1400+/month still.)
Those temperatures don't bother as much since I usually wear a thick coat with a scarf and some other things to keep warm. The only time they bother me is when I'm on a bike or something. Speaking of different people from all over, I checked the demographics of the city and it seems like it's very diverse. The other city I was looking at, DC, is very diverse, but the scene is more international. Are the populations there established? I'm wondering since it makes for some great local culture.

Those rentals are not bad at all. If I do end up moving to DC, then I'm looking at paying more than $1500 for an efficiency. Even more if I love in the hip neighborhoods in the city without a roommate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mjtinmemphis View Post
Chicago would be a great choice if your looking for a big city experience with walkable/bikable neighborhoods. Many fun things to do.

You should not have a problem finding a rental in Chicago under 1500 for a one bedroom. Depending on lifestyle, I personally like south Loop. Many recommend Lincoln Park and Lakeview.

The last two winters have not been too bad. The biggest thing for me has been the lack of sunlight in the winter. Not saying that it may not be bad when you move here. The summers make up for it for most people.
Yeah. For some reason I completely forgot about Chicago. I figured it would be as expensive as LA & NYC because of it's status.

What would you say the average 1 bedroom in a good neighborhood runs for? I don't have any family in the midwest and don't really know anyone out there so if I do move there, I would probably be on my own for a while until I establish a close group of friends. To be honest, my chances of getting into the school system, even with being a male, are pretty slim because I know the state has been having some budget issues.
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Old 05-12-2013, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,831 posts, read 19,096,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
The other city I was looking at, DC, is very diverse, but the scene is more international. Are the populations there established? I'm wondering since it makes for some great local culture.
I'd say some are, yes. Chicago has the 2nd (might be 3rd highest now...was more than NYC but I had heard NYC's total population might have exceeded it now) Mexican population of any city in the US - over 600,000. There's a pretty large Indian population (2nd to NYC), a large Puerto Rican population,a fairly sizable Chinese population, a fair number of Japanese in the suburbs, a fair number of Koreans between the northern end of the city and northern suburbs, a good amount of Vietnamese/Laotian/Cambodian, and a lot of Polish people as well....east African (Somalian/Ethiopian/Sudanese) and some Russian and eastern european as well not counting some other latin american ones like Peruvian or El Salvadoran. On the South Side there is a sizable Jamaican population as well. I'd say there's people from most countries living here just like you'd find in NYC, LA, or DC.


Quote:
Yeah. For some reason I completely forgot about Chicago. I figured it would be as expensive as LA & NYC because of it's status.
Nope. You'd be very surprised at how affordable Chicago can be, unless you want an apartment in a fairly new luxury high rise but that's still cheaper than LA or NYC. I live in a high rise downtown and my rent while under average for the area, can be matched at some other places in the area. I pay just over $1300/month for it..nice view, private gym, 24 hour door staff (doorman). My building was built in the early 80s. I'm also a half block from a train line (Chicago has the 2nd largest transit system after NYC...even larger than DC's) and a bunch of other stuff. If you want this with a pool or two, pretty new appliances right downtown then you'd be looking at $1600+ for a 1 bedroom ($1600 at the low end if the place is say 10 years old...closer to $2000/month or more if it's brand new).

I have a friend who moved here not long ago from Manhattan and was amazed by how cheap it is compared to NYC. That's the case with pretty much everyone from there who finds out. It's one of the most highly regarded cities but for some reason the rent is still not as high compared to DC, NYC, Boston, LA, San Fran...it's about equal to Seattle.

Quote:
What would you say the average 1 bedroom in a good neighborhood runs for? I don't have any family in the midwest and don't really know anyone out there so if I do move there, I would probably be on my own for a while until I establish a close group of friends. To be honest, my chances of getting into the school system, even with being a male, are pretty slim because I know the state has been having some budget issues.
Do you have undergrad or do you have a masters or anything? My coworker's wife is a teacher, with a masters, in one of the good suburbs. He showed me the salaries of the teachers and they get paid...pretty damn well. I'm talking about his wife making 6 figures being there for maybe 10 years. No joke. It's not like this in all suburbs, but the wealthy ones or half upper middle class ones pay a pretty penny for good teachers and the teachers get paid pretty well.

I don't have any teachers in CPS and yeah, some weird stuff going on, but there are the selective enrollment and magnet schools which are very highly rated nationally and not going anywhere.
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Old 05-12-2013, 09:58 PM
 
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Now my interest has been peaked about Chicago. Given its size, it seems underrated compared to other cities considering all it has. It even has some beaches. I remember moving to the current city I'm in right now and feeling trapped because I'm used to living along a large body of water. I'm going to need to plan a trip to go check out the neighborhoods.

That's pretty impressive about the prices you pay and I wouldn't mind that kind of apartment complex considering it was around the same price. In general, I don't have to have a top of the line class A apartment and I would settle for a class B. I just happened to finish looking at metro fares in DC and Chicago as well to my surprise Chicago was $130 less expensive for a 30 day pass! If I end up living there and a school I work at is near a line then I wouldn't even need a car.


I have already finished my undergrad. I'm currently working on my masters in education. Really? What county is it and what others are around there? I tried looking up the CPS salary schedule, but couldn't find anything on the website. I'm figuring they took it off the website due to the teacher strikes., but I know around the DC area, teachers make close to figures after they've been in the system for about 2 decades. DCPS pays the highest IIRC, but that's because they're trying to attract more talent. I may be at an advantage if I were to apply since minority male primary school teachers are a rare at that level.
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Old 05-12-2013, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,831 posts, read 19,096,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
Now my interest has been peaked about Chicago. Given its size, it seems underrated compared to other cities considering all it has. It even has some beaches. I remember moving to the current city I'm in right now and feeling trapped because I'm used to living along a large body of water. I'm going to need to plan a trip to go check out the neighborhoods.
Yeah it has 30 some beaches (one of the beaches in the summer has an electronic music fest on it too). Lakefront is nice with an 18 mile long running/biking/etc trail. But again, the winter...it's not as bad as Minneapolis but it can be cold. I would say though it's fairly rare for a high to be below 20 degrees F honestly. The lows of course can go below that.

Quote:
That's pretty impressive about the prices you pay and I wouldn't mind that kind of apartment complex considering it was around the same price. In general, I don't have to have a top of the line class A apartment and I would settle for a class B. I just happened to finish looking at metro fares in DC and Chicago as well to my surprise Chicago was $130 less expensive for a 30 day pass! If I end up living there and a school I work at is near a line then I wouldn't even need a car.
Compared to the other cities, it's pretty cheap. Your dollar stretches further for sure versus San Fran, LA, DC, Boston, or NYC. That sounds expensive for DC. The *unlimited* 30 day pass here is $100 (they just raised it). I personally used pay as you go and spend around $70/month on public transit. I have never owned a car here - don't need one. When I do there are services like zip car, igo, or rental places.

Quote:
I have already finished my undergrad. I'm currently working on my masters in education. Really? What county is it and what others are around there? I tried looking up the CPS salary schedule, but couldn't find anything on the website. I'm figuring they took it off the website due to the teacher strikes., but I know around the DC area, teachers make close to figures after they've been in the system for about 2 decades. DCPS pays the highest IIRC, but that's because they're trying to attract more talent. I may be at an advantage if I were to apply since minority male primary school teachers are a rare at that level.
Well it's in Cook County, but Cook County is the 2nd largest county in the US by population (after Los Angeles county). My coworker's wife was in one of the cities like Northbrook or Glenview. The other cities that would probably pay a lot and pay extra for someone with a masters is say...Wilmette, Deerfield, Wheeling, Glenview, Northbrook, Hinsdale, Winnetka, Lake Forest...probably part of Evanston, etc. These are usually wealthier suburbs with higher property taxes which go to teachers because they place emphasis on education.

Here is a resource from 2011 but you can look up any teacher's salary part of public schools in the state. You don't have to fill out the entire form. You just need to specify a city

Database:-Search-for-Illinois-teacher-and-administrator-salaries - Chicago Sun-Times
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Old 05-13-2013, 10:47 AM
 
1,356 posts, read 1,641,225 times
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Quote:
That sounds expensive for DC. The *unlimited* 30 day pass here is $100 (they just raised it). I personally used pay as you go and spend around $70/month on public transit. I have never owned a car here - don't need one. When I do there are services like zip car, igo, or rental places.
I don't know what it's like during the early and evening rush in Chicago, but it makes sense that it would be so expensive. The metro is packed during those times and the traffic around the stations comes to a stop basically. That's something else I was meaning to ask: what is the rush like during those times?I generally don't mind if there's a lot of people since I like being in large crowds which is why I like cities in the first place.

And something else: I don't know if you've been to a mid-atlantic city, but a lot of them have narrow streets off the main streets and I was wondering if they are like that in Chicago?

Quote:
Well it's in Cook County, but Cook County is the 2nd largest county in the US by population (after Los Angeles county). My coworker's wife was in one of the cities like Northbrook or Glenview. The other cities that would probably pay a lot and pay extra for someone with a masters is say...Wilmette, Deerfield, Wheeling, Glenview, Northbrook, Hinsdale, Winnetka, Lake Forest...probably part of Evanston, etc. These are usually wealthier suburbs with higher property taxes which go to teachers because they place emphasis on education.

Here is a resource from 2011 but you can look up any teacher's salary part of public schools in the state. You don't have to fill out the entire form. You just need to specify a city

Database:-Search-for-Illinois-teacher-and-administrator-salaries - Chicago Sun-Times
Thanks. Those figures aren't bad.
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Old 05-13-2013, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,831 posts, read 19,096,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
I don't know what it's like during the early and evening rush in Chicago, but it makes sense that it would be so expensive. The metro is packed during those times and the traffic around the stations comes to a stop basically. That's something else I was meaning to ask: what is the rush like during those times?I generally don't mind if there's a lot of people since I like being in large crowds which is why I like cities in the first place.
Yeah rush hour depends on what time, where you're coming from, where you're going, etc. if you're in the Loop (Central Business District) and going north on a few train lines between say oh 5pm and 6:15pm it can be very packed sometimes (not usually uncomfortable but a lot of people). Especially if there is a Cubs game going on (Wrigley Field is in a neighborhood 4-5 miles north of the CBD and the train is very popular). There's definitely times where I've been packed in tightly, but I wouldn't say that's the average. Many people will actually "sit it out" and wait for the next train if it's too packed. Buses can also be busy. Going south is not a problem...there can be a decent number of people during it, but it's not packed. If you go west on the Blue line, it's kind of in the middle...i've been where it's been comfortable and a few times when it was fairly packed.

Quote:
And something else: I don't know if you've been to a mid-atlantic city, but a lot of them have narrow streets off the main streets and I was wondering if they are like that in Chicago?
Yeah I've been to DC a lot. My college roommate lived there and now old town Alexandria. The main streets in Chicago are not like European style or anything, The main streets in the downtown area are pretty wide but in the residential areas and other neighborhoods it's not as wide nearly. Not as narrow as the likes of Philadelphia though, for example. Here's some examples:

Lincoln Park residential: arlington and clark chicago, il - Google Maps
Lakeview residential: greenview and irving park chicago, il - Google Maps
Lakeview more commercial area: Broadway & Diversey, Chicago, IL - Google Maps
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Old 05-13-2013, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
Thanks for the recs so far guys. I do have a question about some places though. Don't cities such as Austin and Portland have huge college populations which make up a large section of it's youth?


San Diego: isn't that just as the expensive as the city I'm currently looking at(DC)?

Chicago: That's another place I was looking at since it's a huge city similar to NYC, but not as expensive. Are the winters pretty bad and how much does rent go for in a good neighborhood?
For Portland, no. We do have universities and some small colleges within and some around the city limits but I do not believe it makes up the largest section of Portland's youth. Portland has become a youthful city with that population plus the many young people relocating here due to its reputation as being a have for young creatives, enterprenuers and professionals. It's just a city that seems to appeal to young people in general.

So large population of college students, perhaps, but huge, I wouldn't say so.
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Old 05-14-2013, 09:36 AM
 
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Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Yeah rush hour depends on what time, where you're coming from, where you're going, etc. if you're in the Loop (Central Business District) and going north on a few train lines between say oh 5pm and 6:15pm it can be very packed sometimes (not usually uncomfortable but a lot of people). Especially if there is a Cubs game going on (Wrigley Field is in a neighborhood 4-5 miles north of the CBD and the train is very popular). There's definitely times where I've been packed in tightly, but I wouldn't say that's the average. Many people will actually "sit it out" and wait for the next train if it's too packed. Buses can also be busy. Going south is not a problem...there can be a decent number of people during it, but it's not packed. If you go west on the Blue line, it's kind of in the middle...i've been where it's been comfortable and a few times when it was fairly packed.

Yeah I've been to DC a lot. My college roommate lived there and now old town Alexandria. The main streets in Chicago are not like European style or anything, The main streets in the downtown area are pretty wide but in the residential areas and other neighborhoods it's not as wide nearly. Not as narrow as the likes of Philadelphia though, for example. Here's some examples:

Lincoln Park residential: arlington and clark chicago, il - Google Maps
Lakeview residential: greenview and irving park chicago, il - Google Maps
Lakeview more commercial area: Broadway & Diversey, Chicago, IL - Google Maps
Thank you. You've been very helpful and it's likely I'll be planning a trip there soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
For Portland, no. We do have universities and some small colleges within and some around the city limits but I do not believe it makes up the largest section of Portland's youth. Portland has become a youthful city with that population plus the many young people relocating here due to its reputation as being a have for young creatives, enterprenuers and professionals. It's just a city that seems to appeal to young people in general.

So large population of college students, perhaps, but huge, I wouldn't say so.
I see. How affordable is portland?Most of my impressions of the city come that tv show Portlandia.
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