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Old 05-13-2013, 04:48 PM
 
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I've always thought of Madison as a miniature D.C.
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Old 05-13-2013, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,229,371 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diff1 View Post
D.C. is like a mixture of Boston and Richmond va.
I disagree. IMO, DC from a modern standpoint is culturally, linguistically, and pretty much demographically (apart from African-American population) not like Richmond. Maybe pre-Civil War the two could've been considered more similar, but today, comparing DC to Richmond is pretty much like comparing Indianapolis to Louisville. Close proximity, but vast differences. I know you're probably going to disagree with me, so let's just call it a difference in opinions and leave it at that. I'm not interested in getting into a long, drawn out war.
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Old 05-13-2013, 07:55 PM
 
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Lol so why even make that comment??
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Old 05-13-2013, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diff1 View Post
Lol so why even make that comment??
To make my opinion heard.
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Old 05-13-2013, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diff1 View Post
Lol so why even make that comment??
Upon reading a similar thread, I've seen you get into an argument over this very topic, and I'm not going through 3,000 posts just to prove my point. So why make that comment? There's your answer. I think you're wrong, and I don't feel the need to disprove your point to prove mine. To do so would be an extraordinary waste of time.

So stick to your misguided views and have a good one. Don't bother replying, because I won't answer back.

Last edited by stlouisan; 05-13-2013 at 10:52 PM..
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Old 05-13-2013, 10:53 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,823 posts, read 12,330,814 times
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Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Of course, you'll never find an exact replica of DC. It is definitely a very uniquely designed city and definitely has some of the most attractive urban neighborhoods in the US, particularly for its very nicely preserved/restored rowhouse neighborhoods. For one, it seems very "bucolic" compared to other rowhouse-dominated cities.

I don't necessarily understand the comparisons to Seattle, however. That city has much more of a modernist, suburban and natural bent for its built environment to be compared to DC. It's the quintessential West Coast city, whereas DC is very much East Coast.

To me DC is very much defined by its rowhouse architecture. To this end, it definitely has comparability to Boston, but I actually think moreso to cities like Baltimore, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Brooklyn. Even Chicago's neighborhoods seem to have some comparability in terms of architecture and wider avenues.

In terms of Philadelphia, I've always gotten very similar vibes between the more suburban portions of the Northwest Quadrant of DC, Chevy Chase and Bethesda compared to Philadelphia's Main Line, Chestnut Hill and Mount Airy. Philly and Baltimore's more gentrified rowhouse neighborhoods also provide a vibe that can be similar to DC.

In terms of the new urbanist "edge cities" in the DC area (e.g., Ballston, Rosslyn, Bethesda, Silver Spring), you're going to be hard pressed to find those on a similar scale in other East Coast/Midwest metros.
In terms of the New Urbanist stuff and Tysons Corner/Bethesda/Rosslyn/Crystal City type places I think for some reason the Dallas-Fort Worth area has some similarities.

Perhaps some similarities with lower and central Montgomery County and parts of the North Carolina Triangle?
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Old 05-14-2013, 01:48 AM
 
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DC is unique. Boston is more similar than other cities (ie. maybe Philadelphia, too? I have never been).

Seattle and the NC Triangle have been mentioned, but they don't even come close to DC. Poor comparisons.
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Old 05-14-2013, 02:25 AM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Upon reading a similar thread, I've seen you get into an argument over this very topic, and I'm not going through 3,000 posts just to prove my point. So why make that comment? There's your answer. I think you're wrong, and I don't feel the need to disprove your point to prove mine. To do so would be an extraordinary waste of time.

So stick to your misguided views and have a good one. Don't bother replying, because I won't answer back.
Hmm...I see your point, but physically, those two cities do share commonalities. I might agree with Diff1. While DC's suburbs are definitely more like Philly's suburbs from my perspective, the D.C. interior reminds me a lot of Richmond's, but of course, it is on a smaller scale.

Richmond scenes comparing to op's original examples:

1) A Grand/Wide Ave. - 3 miles from dtwn | Another - 5 miles from dtwn

2) Quaint Neighborhood in City Limits, close to transit (bus 3 blocks)

3) Richmond Suburb (Tuckahoe - 12 or so miles from dtwn)

Perhaps my perspective is a bit different since I've lived in both, but I'm fine with DC being described as a much larger, more cosmopolitan Richmond with different demo's - it's also cheaper to film there, which is why it is often used as a stand-in for DC lol. Richmond is just simply not as big as D.C., and in particular, underrated. Still, in general the VA cities all have that same old english influenced, low-rise, tight build that is found throughout the mid-atlantic. It just happens to be further south. It's clear that the trends that were popular in DC, were also popular there, which is not the case any further south, as in North Carolina. And the styling in Charleston and Savannah is markedly different. Have you visited Richmond? You might be surprised at how it feels and looks.

In terms of suburbs, so many parallels can be drawn between Philadelphia and DC. For example, King of Prussia vs. Tysons; Ardmore vs. Friendship Heights; Chestnut Hill vs. Chevy Chase; Conshohocken vs. Silver Spring, etc. I think that it's almost comical. Wisconsin Ave in DC actually reminds me a lot of Montgomery Ave (in Montco, outside Philly) although it is much more residential in character.
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Old 05-14-2013, 05:16 AM
 
21,195 posts, read 30,379,606 times
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Originally Posted by Summersm343 View Post
Philadelphia metro is very similar to D.C. metro
The metro area perhaps, but not the actual cities overall. I lived in both cities.
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Old 05-14-2013, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,229,371 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by aquest1 View Post
Hmm...I see your point, but physically, those two cities do share commonalities. I might agree with Diff1. While DC's suburbs are definitely more like Philly's suburbs from my perspective, the D.C. interior reminds me a lot of Richmond's, but of course, it is on a smaller scale.

Richmond scenes comparing to op's original examples:

1) A Grand/Wide Ave. - 3 miles from dtwn | Another - 5 miles from dtwn

2) Quaint Neighborhood in City Limits, close to transit (bus 3 blocks)

3) Richmond Suburb (Tuckahoe - 12 or so miles from dtwn)

Perhaps my perspective is a bit different since I've lived in both, but I'm fine with DC being described as a much larger, more cosmopolitan Richmond with different demo's - it's also cheaper to film there, which is why it is often used as a stand-in for DC lol. Richmond is just simply not as big as D.C., and in particular, underrated. Still, in general the VA cities all have that same old english influenced, low-rise, tight build that is found throughout the mid-atlantic. It just happens to be further south. It's clear that the trends that were popular in DC, were also popular there, which is not the case any further south, as in North Carolina. And the styling in Charleston and Savannah is markedly different. Have you visited Richmond? You might be surprised at how it feels and looks.

In terms of suburbs, so many parallels can be drawn between Philadelphia and DC. For example, King of Prussia vs. Tysons; Ardmore vs. Friendship Heights; Chestnut Hill vs. Chevy Chase; Conshohocken vs. Silver Spring, etc. I think that it's almost comical. Wisconsin Ave in DC actually reminds me a lot of Montgomery Ave (in Montco, outside Philly) although it is much more residential in character.
Architecturally, I'll give points to Diff1 on that. In every other respect, I will strongfully disagree that D.C. belongs in the same boat as Richmond.
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