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Old 05-14-2013, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,064,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I don't find it to be that big of a reach actually. There are parts of NOVA and Montgomery County that I find to be Californiaish. Definitely a lot of Asians. Definitely a lot of Central Americans. It just doesn't have those groups in the same numbers and proportions as SoCal.
But to get a west coast feel anywhere in DC because of a car culture which is very very small to non-existant to begin with? That's a stretch, don't you think. Honestly, I don't see a hint of a West Coast feel (obviously since it's on the East Coast) in DC or DC suburbs.
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Old 05-14-2013, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,064,736 times
Reputation: 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diff1 View Post
Stlousian D.C. is over 50% black there is not too many NE cities like that(nickname chocolate city), D.C. doesn't have an industrial past like other NE cities, doesn't have an ethnic white population, its architecture is similar to RVA, and besides maybe Alexandia its suburbs resembles ATLs. I agree that today D.C. is not your sterotypical version of the south but i dont think its a true NE city either Mid Atlantic will have to do i guess. And why do you seem so angry lol
Yeah when you look at DC demographics historically, you see that DC is more in line with Atlanta and the Southeast Coast than it is with cities in the Northeast.
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Old 05-14-2013, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
I will concede that the DC area is definitely more diverse, and crime levels are marginally better in the DC area. For wealth, you must account for differences in cost-of-living; higher salaries in the DC area are definitely eaten up by much higher housing costs.
I just don't see many similarities between the two regions. Rowhouses. Transit. Okay. Is that it?

I find the COL (at least in the city proper) to be a non-factor because you can get paid significantly more in DC than you could in Philly. There are only a couple of law firms in Philly, for example, that pay NYC/DC market rates for a first year associate. And then the pay structure after the first year tilts toward those latter cities substantially, particularly after accounting for bonuses. So even if you're paying $1,200 more rent in DC, you may be making $50,000 more than you would be in Philly, so you're still coming out ahead.

Aside from that, you're talking about two very different types of metro areas. DC is transient and polished. Philadelphia is homegrown and gritty. Washingtonians are diplomatic and career-driven. Philadelphians are confrontational and laid back. If we're speaking in very broad terms (i.e., English-speaking, rowhouses, both in America), then yes, the two areas are very similar. But if we're going just off feel and vibe alone, I'd say the two cities could not be more different. Philly is really more of a combination of NYC and Baltimore, imo. DC is just something entirely different.
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Old 05-14-2013, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,247,479 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
But to get a west coast feel anywhere in DC because of a car culture which is very very small to non-existant to begin with? That's a stretch, don't you think. Honestly, I don't see a hint of a West Coast feel (obviously since it's on the East Coast) in DC or DC suburbs.
I didn't focus so much on the car culture part of his statement. I've never really kicked it all that hard in Northern Virginia so I can't really speak on that. I was just referring more or less to the demographic makeup of the suburbs. If you go to Montgomery or Wheaton Mall, then yes, the demographics will closely resemble what you'd see in Cerritos, California.

And this area of Montgomery County does remind me of Southern California in many ways.

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Sligo,...,212.97,,0,0.1

Last edited by BajanYankee; 05-14-2013 at 05:20 PM..
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Old 05-14-2013, 07:22 PM
Status: "Got the rocking modern neon sound" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Boston
2,041 posts, read 1,994,420 times
Reputation: 1740
Quote:
Originally Posted by HurricaneDC View Post
Hey all,

What are some cities and metropolitan areas similar to DC and the DC area? One of the things I love about DC is the architecture, how there aren't tons of high rises, lots of wide avenues, and very tranquil neighborhoods in the city proper. For example, here's a street view of the main drag of an urban neighborhood (ignore the link titles, only the first one is the Dupont Circle neighborhood):

dupont circle - Google Maps

And then here's my mother's neighborhood, still in the city limits, still near a major roadway and a Metro station:

dupont circle - Google Maps

Another example of a calm, almost suburban-like neighborhood in DC:

dupont circle - Google Maps

And then it's surrounded by great suburbs like Arlington, Bethesda, and Silver Spring. All of them have great urban cores with quiet subdivisions full of beautiful housing, not cookie-cutter McMansion tracts. Yes, the farther-out suburbs have that, but that's largely due to the fact that they only started seeing tons of development in the past few decades. For example, here's the neighborhood I grew up in

Google Maps

So what cities in the US are like DC? Not so much culturally but in terms of how they're laid out and what their metro areas look like? I've heard Seattle is pretty similar; you can be surrounded by a dense urban neighborhood, drive two minutes and be in a quiet neighborhood, then drive two more and be in a big wooded area... all within the city proper.
Boston would probably be pretty similar. The last part (bloded) is definitely true for Boston, more so, I think, than for any other US city.

Here are some street views:

Davis Square

Kenmore Square

Here's an aerial view that shows the "suburban ridiculously close to urban" thing near Beacon Street

And here's a suburban neighborhood in the city limits:

West Roxbury (poor quality image, though....)

That having been said, I think there are differences between the two. There are more tall buildings in Boston. The streets downtown tend to be much narrower. And There are more triple deckers in Boston.

Another thing that's both similar and different between the two are the suburbs. I was in Silver Spring a few weeks ago, and I was surprised by how modern it was. There were a lot of office-park looking high-rises.

Boston also has a ton of suburbs that have really nice dense urban cores like Salem, Waltham, Haverhill, Lowell, Lexington, Rockport, Newburyport, Gloucester, New Bedford, but they are all very old and not very modern like Silver Spring.
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Old 05-14-2013, 08:33 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,250 posts, read 19,550,442 times
Reputation: 13013
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I didn't focus so much on the car culture part of his statement. I've never really kicked it all that hard in Northern Virginia so I can't really speak on that. I was just referring more or less to the demographic makeup of the suburbs. If you go to Montgomery or Wheaton Mall, then yes, the demographics will closely resemble what you'd see in Cerritos, California.

And this area of Montgomery County does remind me of Southern California in many ways.

Sligo, MD - Google Maps
I agree with you to an extent. When I visited Greater LA, there were a number of places that strangely reminded me of suburban Maryland and northern Virginia and even the northern part of DC. I guess the demographics had something to do with it - a high population of Latinos and Asians obviously. But even the low-rise buildings did.

I'm a little surprised that you don't hear about this comparison that often.
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Old 05-15-2013, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,229,371 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Yeah when you look at DC demographics historically, you see that DC is more in line with Atlanta and the Southeast Coast than it is with cities in the Northeast.
Historically, but not from a modern standpoint.
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Old 05-15-2013, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,064,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Historically, but not from a modern standpoint.
Well I do agree you in general that DC is not a Southern city at least compared to how it was in the 50s. However, are the demographics that much different than Atlanta today? Is so, where?
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,459 posts, read 7,525,289 times
Reputation: 4344
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
There are only a couple of law firms in Philly, for example, that pay NYC/DC market rates for a first year associate. And then the pay structure after the first year tilts toward those latter cities substantially, particularly after accounting for bonuses. So even if you're paying $1,200 more rent in DC, you may be making $50,000 more than you would be in Philly, so you're still coming out ahead.
For the legal field, you may be correct -- but there are, of course, many other types of professions in the area. In terms of median income (not averages that are skewed by a larger cohort of upper-end earners) the differences are marginal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Aside from that, you're talking about two very different types of metro areas. DC is transient and polished. Philadelphia is homegrown and gritty. Washingtonians are diplomatic and career-driven. Philadelphians are confrontational and laid back. If we're speaking in very broad terms (i.e., English-speaking, rowhouses, both in America), then yes, the two areas are very similar. But if we're going just off feel and vibe alone, I'd say the two cities could not be more different. Philly is really more of a combination of NYC and Baltimore, imo. DC is just something entirely different.
I think you're relying a bit too much on lore and stereotypes here. Obviously, Philadelphia has a much more blue-collar heritage, but there's no denying the city -- and its social atmosphere -- is changing very markedly as it transitions into a new economic era. It certainly is not static as you seem to imply.

I will agree that DC is much more transient -- and I'd argue career-obsessed -- but I think both of those aspects are driven by being the center of country's "political elites." Even so, breaking down the facade of most people here, they are essentially normal human beings.
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Old 05-22-2013, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,169,523 times
Reputation: 9483
Quote:
Originally Posted by HurricaneDC View Post
Hey all,

What are some cities and metropolitan areas similar to DC and the DC area? One of the things I love about DC is the architecture, how there aren't tons of high rises, lots of wide avenues, and very tranquil neighborhoods in the city proper. For example, here's a street view of the main drag of an urban neighborhood (ignore the link titles, only the first one is the Dupont Circle neighborhood):

dupont circle - Google Maps

And then here's my mother's neighborhood, still in the city limits, still near a major roadway and a Metro station:

dupont circle - Google Maps

Another example of a calm, almost suburban-like neighborhood in DC:

dupont circle - Google Maps

And then it's surrounded by great suburbs like Arlington, Bethesda, and Silver Spring. All of them have great urban cores with quiet subdivisions full of beautiful housing, not cookie-cutter McMansion tracts. Yes, the farther-out suburbs have that, but that's largely due to the fact that they only started seeing tons of development in the past few decades. For example, here's the neighborhood I grew up in

Google Maps

So what cities in the US are like DC? Not so much culturally but in terms of how they're laid out and what their metro areas look like? I've heard Seattle is pretty similar; you can be surrounded by a dense urban neighborhood, drive two minutes and be in a quiet neighborhood, then drive two more and be in a big wooded area... all within the city proper.
The last three images, are commonly found in almost every metro across the U.S.

The uniqueness of DC is in the colorful rowhomes with the coned roofs and such. I can't think of anywhere quite like that. But, Baltimore and Philadelphia has the rowhomes, so that might be as close as it gets. But, the DC rowhomes are really gorgeous comparitively.
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