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Old 01-17-2018, 03:47 PM
 
Location: IN
20,866 posts, read 36,004,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPonteKC View Post
You’re either bad at linguistics or math.
KC has zero evidence of NCVS accent like Chicago or St. Louis, and does not have any defining northern speech patterns. It does exhibit a mixture of neutral and southern accents for sure. You would know this if you have lived in or visited the vast majority of the Midwest region.
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Old 01-17-2018, 03:48 PM
 
Location: IN
20,866 posts, read 36,004,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Minnesota has been called "the Northwest" by many as late as the 1960s. (Yes, they know about Seattle and Portland. It's just a holdover from the days before the Dakotas achieved statehood in the late 19th century). To this day, many old businesses in the Twin Cities still carry the Northwest moniker.
Agree on that point for sure. As recently as the early 1980s, WCCO had a bumper that stated "The Northwest News Leader."
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Old 01-18-2018, 06:20 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,859,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPonteKC View Post
Again, you are wrong here. The Midwest did not “come from”the Northwest territory. It’s a term invented to describe a region that was, by definition, not part of the Northwest. It’s described the middle belt of territories between the NW and the southwest.
And that is describing Kentucky how? Kentucky wasn't between Northwest anything. We are speaking Kentucky. Get in the thread subject why don't ya
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Old 01-18-2018, 06:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
KC has zero evidence of NCVS accent like Chicago or St. Louis, and does not have any defining northern speech patterns. It does exhibit a mixture of neutral and southern accents for sure. You would know this if you have lived in or visited the vast majority of the Midwest region.
Who said KC sounded Northern?
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Old 01-18-2018, 10:31 AM
 
Location: IN
20,866 posts, read 36,004,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Who said KC sounded Northern?
It wasn't asked directly, but is a fact on the ground. KC accents have southern influences, but no northern influences, the opposite often being the case for STL.
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Old 01-18-2018, 12:26 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,740,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
If we are going to take states out of the Midwest, I suppose anything in the Plains could be put into the Western region. Once ranching > farming then IMO it is no longer culturally Midwestern.

Maybe the Midwest ends at Kansas City and Kansas itself and other similar Plains states are transitional between Midwestern and Western.

Kind of how some regions of Ohio are somewhat like Pennsylvania.
Yes the Great Plains are a transition zone between West and Midwest....

Missouri is also the Transition between North (Midwest) and South.... probably leans more southern honestly, ive made stops north of Kansas City and the people all had southern accents and they all had that overly friendly stereotypical southern attitude...
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Old 01-18-2018, 12:31 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,859,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Yes the Great Plains are a transition zone between West and Midwest....

Missouri is also the Transition between North (Midwest) and South.... probably leans more southern honestly, ive made stops north of Kansas City and the people all had southern accents and they all had that overly friendly stereotypical southern attitude...
Missouri is not mostly Southern though. In its most populated areas people align with the Midwest.

The only true Southern areas are south of 60 and there is a Delta feel in the Bootheel
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Old 01-18-2018, 12:37 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,740,969 times
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Driving on I-90 in South Dakota you will notice an obvious transition from Midwest to West once you cross the Missouri River, you go through windy roads through the valley and the road opens up and it has that typical western atmosphere where everything is so open and the roads seem to go on forever...

I-80 in Nebraska i have only driven in the dark except i believe i got to experience the transition which may have been in North Platte.

Never driven I-70 in Kansas

I have only driven I-35 through Kansas twice and they were both at night unfortunately so i never got to see arguably the "South Western corner" of the Midwest.

I am not too familiar with the situation out East, most of my travels take me out West.
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Old 01-18-2018, 12:43 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,740,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Missouri is not mostly Southern though. In its most populated areas people align with the Midwest.

The only true Southern areas are south of 60 and there is a Delta feel in the Bootheel
I honestly just go with the accent and the attitude of the people, ill be honest i have never been to the deep south (Alabama, Georgia) i have only been to the Carolina's, Tennessee and Kentucky. but i have always been surprised how far north the southern accent can reach, two places that blew my mind were NW Indiana and Des Moines Iowa.

I've always lived in the Midwest and i notice a definite difference once i got to Missouri, but again i live in the "Upper Midwest" and maybe i am just not used to the real Midwest so i think of it as southern when it really isnt?
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Old 01-18-2018, 12:45 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,740,969 times
Reputation: 9029
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Missouri is not mostly Southern though. In its most populated areas people align with the Midwest.

The only true Southern areas are south of 60 and there is a Delta feel in the Bootheel
Is that on the lines of political beliefs?
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