U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-17-2013, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,228,729 times
Reputation: 998

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by STLgasm View Post
Since Missouri draws its influences from pretty much every region, I think it would be fair to say it's about 25% western, 25% eastern, 25% northern/midwestern, and 25% southern. Indiana, Illinois and Ohio also have strong southern colorations in their lower portions.
If that's the case, then Iowa is 25% Western and 25% Eastern. That means Iowa is like a Great Plains state and the eastern half of it is like the East Coast.

Missouri is not at all western, I'm sorry. Not even close to 25%. As far as eastern, Missouri is nothing like East Coast states. That leaves Midwestern as the only options to fill in those areas. Missouri is nothing like the Great Plains states.

Missouri is an overall Midwestern state (Midwestern being like the Great Plains states, 25% from Iowa, and 25% from the Great Lakes states) with about a 25% southern influence. It is a part of the Midwest, any way you cut it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-18-2013, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Manhattan
1,168 posts, read 2,534,823 times
Reputation: 1354
I've always considered Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Missouri to be the Midwest. The Dakotas, Nebraska, and Kansas to be it's own region of the Great Plains, and I consider Kentucky to be a part of the South.

Although Ohio, Michigan, and Wisconsin are the only states that feel Midwestern as a whole to me. A lot of Minnesota and Iowa feel like the Great Plains, and a lot of Missouri, Indiana, and Illinois feel Southern.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2013, 05:41 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Kentucky is Southern. West Virginia is literally the only state in the continental United States that doesn't firmly fit into one region or another. The northern third is interior Northeast; the southern third is the South, and the middle third is something in between.
Seriously? Growing up in W. PA, we always thought of WV as southern, ditto Maryland. W VA did allow slavery, ditto MD. MD is as ambiguous as W VA.

History of slavery in West Virginia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
History of slavery in Maryland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
********************************

As for Missouri, that's another state we always considered southern in my childhood. Even when I lived in Illinois, I regarded MO as southern. It wasn't until I met my DH from Nebraska that I learned that some people (him) consider MO the midwest, not southern.

Re: Illinois, even though the people of way southern IL speak with a southern-lite accent, it's still Illinois. It's still the "Land of Lincoln", not the south.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2013, 07:35 PM
 
892 posts, read 1,080,433 times
Reputation: 1054
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
If that's the case, then Iowa is 25% Western and 25% Eastern. That means Iowa is like a Great Plains state and the eastern half of it is like the East Coast.

Missouri is not at all western, I'm sorry. Not even close to 25%. As far as eastern, Missouri is nothing like East Coast states. That leaves Midwestern as the only options to fill in those areas. Missouri is nothing like the Great Plains states.

Missouri is an overall Midwestern state (Midwestern being like the Great Plains states, 25% from Iowa, and 25% from the Great Lakes states) with about a 25% southern influence. It is a part of the Midwest, any way you cut it.
I agree that Missouri is solidly Midwestern, but it does draw influences from all regions. I think Kansas City has a more western feel to it (think Denver) than it does to St. Louis, which feels like a much older, more eastern city (think Pittsburgh, Cincinnati). The northern part of the state may as well be Iowa, and the southern part may as well be Arkansas. It is a taste of all regions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2013, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
654 posts, read 1,615,080 times
Reputation: 862
Always in the midwest?

OH, MI, IN, WI, IL, IA, MN, ND, SD, NE, MO, KS
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2013, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,228,729 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Seriously? Growing up in W. PA, we always thought of WV as southern, ditto Maryland. W VA did allow slavery, ditto MD. MD is as ambiguous as W VA.

History of slavery in West Virginia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
History of slavery in Maryland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
********************************

As for Missouri, that's another state we always considered southern in my childhood. Even when I lived in Illinois, I regarded MO as southern. It wasn't until I met my DH from Nebraska that I learned that some people (him) consider MO the midwest, not southern.

Re: Illinois, even though the people of way southern IL speak with a southern-lite accent, it's still Illinois. It's still the "Land of Lincoln", not the south.
Missouri is not Southern, and "you guys" were dead wrong to think of it as such. Some people consider it the Midwest? MOST people consider it the Midwest. It is not the South. As far as Maryland goes, Maryland is hardly as ambiguous as West Virginia. Culturally, demographically, and linguistically the state is more in line with the Northeast than the South. And allowing slavery doesn't necessarily make a state Southern. Missouri is an overall Midwestern state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2013, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,228,729 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by STLgasm View Post
I agree that Missouri is solidly Midwestern, but it does draw influences from all regions. I think Kansas City has a more western feel to it (think Denver) than it does to St. Louis, which feels like a much older, more eastern city (think Pittsburgh, Cincinnati). The northern part of the state may as well be Iowa, and the southern part may as well be Arkansas. It is a taste of all regions.
I disagree about KC feeling more like Denver than STL. KC culturally, demographically, and linguistically has a lot of similarities to STL. Cincinnati is Midwestern. St. Louis does feel like Pittsburgh, but it is a Midwestern city. As far as the southern part, I'll give the southern third to Arkansas. Does it draw influences from all regions? Yes, I do agree with that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2013, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,228,729 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by jayp1188 View Post
I've always considered Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Missouri to be the Midwest. The Dakotas, Nebraska, and Kansas to be it's own region of the Great Plains, and I consider Kentucky to be a part of the South.

Although Ohio, Michigan, and Wisconsin are the only states that feel Midwestern as a whole to me. A lot of Minnesota and Iowa feel like the Great Plains, and a lot of Missouri, Indiana, and Illinois feel Southern.
The Dakotas, Nebraska, and Kansas are no more different from the Midwest than Oklahoma and Texas are from Arkansas and Louisiana. They are still Midwestern, just as OK and TX are still Southern. KS, NE, SD, and ND are culturally, linguistically, and demographically Midwestern.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2013, 02:00 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Missouri is not Southern, and "you guys" were dead wrong to think of it as such. Some people consider it the Midwest? MOST people consider it the Midwest. It is not the South. As far as Maryland goes, Maryland is hardly as ambiguous as West Virginia. Culturally, demographically, and linguistically the state is more in line with the Northeast than the South. And allowing slavery doesn't necessarily make a state Southern. Missouri is an overall Midwestern state.
Maryland is not the northeast. Have you not heard what John Kennedy said about DC? Paraphrasing, "a city of northern charm and southern efficiency". Part of Maryland was taken to make DC. My sister-in-law, not yet 60, grew up in western Maryland and remembers segregated lunch counters. Maryland is neither north nor south.

Back to ignore you go!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2013, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,228,729 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Seriously? Growing up in W. PA, we always thought of WV as southern, ditto Maryland. W VA did allow slavery, ditto MD. MD is as ambiguous as W VA.

History of slavery in West Virginia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
History of slavery in Maryland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
********************************

As for Missouri, that's another state we always considered southern in my childhood. Even when I lived in Illinois, I regarded MO as southern. It wasn't until I met my DH from Nebraska that I learned that some people (him) consider MO the midwest, not southern.

Re: Illinois, even though the people of way southern IL speak with a southern-lite accent, it's still Illinois. It's still the "Land of Lincoln", not the south.
Goes to show how some people choose to regard something as being one thing without ever having been there...big mistake. Your opinion of Missouri was and still is in the minority. Calling Missouri Southern is the equivalent of calling Kentucky Midwestern. It's wrong.

And there you go again with your opinionated knowledge of linguistics. As the University of Pennylvania studies and many other linguistics maps indicate, the "South Midland" dialect extends all the way up to Central Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Northern Missouri. It is not a Southern accent...it has a few Southern tendencies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top