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Old 12-23-2017, 11:07 AM
 
384 posts, read 123,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
Kentucky is Southern. West Virginia is literally the only state in the continental United States that doesn't firmly fit into one region or another. The northern third is interior Northeast; the southern third is the South, and the middle third is something in between.
Very true, West Virginia is almost the crossroads of all states east of the Mississippi River. Weirton and Wheeling are 30 miles from Pittsburgh and within Pittsburgh's media market. Huntington is across the river from Ironton and Proctorville Ohio while Ashland Kentucky is just to the west. For this reason, Huntington definitely has closer affiliation with communities in neighboring states. South of Beckley and Tamarack, West Virginia definitely has a more southern feel. The northernmost location of the Bojangles chain is in Princeton WV, 10-15 miles from the tunnel on I 77 that splits WV and VA, and Princeton is a 3 hour drive from Charlotte, NC and closer to that city than Wheeling and Weirton. The eastern panhandle of West Virginia near Martinsburg has a more East Coast feel due to the presence of Interstate 81, which runs northeast through Harrisburg and on to Watertown, NY, and the fact that Martinsburg and extreme eastern WV gets WUSA and other television stations from Washington DC.
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Old 12-23-2017, 12:25 PM
 
2,013 posts, read 1,011,832 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by droc31 View Post
I consider North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, northwest Indiana (from Valparaiso westward) to be the Midwest. I've always thought of Kentucky as a Southern state, while Ohio and Michigan are part of the Great Lakes region separate from the Midwest because they follow Eastern Time and are actually closer to the East Coast than you might think. (Youngstown Ohio is less than 400 miles from both New York and Philadelphia) South Dakota's inclusion as a Midwestern State is debatable, because their attractions(Mt. Rushmore, Black Hills National Park) and most recognized cities (Rapid City, Sturgis, Deadwood) are all closer to Gillette Wyoming than Minneapolis or Chicago. These locations are culturally more Western and also follow Rocky Mountain Time which puts them out of sync with the rest of the Midwestern States.
Not all Midwestern states are on Central Time, and there are other cities that are closer to other regions than Chicago, as well. I get what you're saying about South Dakota, but it's directly under North Dakota, which is also closer to some Western states. The Midwest is huge, and there are going to be variations...
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Old 12-28-2017, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,377,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by droc31 View Post
I consider North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, northwest Indiana (from Valparaiso westward) to be the Midwest. I've always thought of Kentucky as a Southern state, while Ohio and Michigan are part of the Great Lakes region separate from the Midwest because they follow Eastern Time and are actually closer to the East Coast than you might think. (Youngstown Ohio is less than 400 miles from both New York and Philadelphia) South Dakota's inclusion as a Midwestern State is debatable, because their attractions(Mt. Rushmore, Black Hills National Park) and most recognized cities (Rapid City, Sturgis, Deadwood) are all closer to Gillette Wyoming than Minneapolis or Chicago. These locations are culturally more Western and also follow Rocky Mountain Time which puts them out of sync with the rest of the Midwestern States.

The Great Lakes are not exclusive from the Midwest. Indiana, Wisconsin, Illinois and Minnesota are also in the GLs. Michigan not the Midwest? Its got more in common with Wisconsin and Minnesota over all then it does with Pennsylvania and New York and with most of Ohio. Ohio and Michigan are further east but it doesn't mean they're not the Midwest.

Time zone is irrelevant. The Southeast is split into two time zones as well.
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Old 12-30-2017, 11:24 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,721 posts, read 9,015,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by US64WB View Post
Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin are the only 100% solid Midwestern states. Illinois and Indiana are both probably 95 percent Midwestern or more but the extreme southern portions of them seem more like a transition zone leading to the South. Ohio is mostly Midwestern but extreme southern Ohio is like southern Illinois and Indiana, and extreme eastern Ohio is more like the Northeast. Only the far eastern portions of South Dakota and Nebraska are solidly Midwestern, draw a line north to south at about York, Nebraska and use that as a reference point. In Nebraska and South Dakota, East of that line could be considered Midwestern in those states, West of that line the transition zone to the West begins. Although I have still even noticed a slight to moderately strong western feel/culture in parts of eastern South Dakota! North Dakota retains a Midwestern feel for much further than South Dakota or Nebraska I think personally, it really didn't seem super "western" until around where the badlands begin. Northern Missouri seems solidly Midwestern, but get South of US 50 and it seems to turn into a bit of a gray area. And only Northeastern Kansas is solidly Midwestern. The rest of the state seems to be either transitioning to either the South or the West, and the western parts of the state seem solidly Western.
I agree with your assessments here. The line where the west begins is about the 100th meridian which in the Dakotas goes along the Missouri River.
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Old 12-30-2017, 12:29 PM
 
2,013 posts, read 1,011,832 times
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All of those states that US64WB named...ALL of those states are Midwest states. Every region has variations, and one could divide the Midwest by the Great Lakes States, and the rest...but, we don't. Whether anyone likes it, or not, all of those states comprise the Midwest.
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Old 12-30-2017, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,864 posts, read 1,252,670 times
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Indiana, Ohio, Illinois for certain.
Iowa is one of the boundary states for the western part of the Midwest and Missouri is the Southern boundary.

Michigan, Minnesota, and WI but they also fall into Great Lakes States. MN and MI in particular because they feel a bit different than the rest of the Midwest.

ND, SD, NE, & KS are Great Plains states to me.

Just my opinion
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Old 12-30-2017, 07:43 PM
 
321 posts, read 160,060 times
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Lower Midwest: Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Missouri.
Upper Midwest: Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota.
Great Plains: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas.
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Old 12-30-2017, 07:46 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,873,308 times
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I have seen these type threads since starting on City-Data. Why does it matter how a state is labeled and how could this possibly mean anything? Just curious?
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Old 12-30-2017, 10:57 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,721 posts, read 9,015,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
I have seen these type threads since starting on City-Data. Why does it matter how a state is labeled and how could this possibly mean anything? Just curious?
I don't think it matters to anyone, I think it's just something people find interesting. At least I do.
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Old 12-30-2017, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,864 posts, read 1,252,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
I don't think it matters to anyone, I think it's just something people find interesting. At least I do.
It is interesting

Okay, now that I see you are in North Dakota I have to ask you the same question--do you consider your state part of the Midwest?
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