U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-29-2015, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Columbia, MD
1,433 posts, read 1,998,132 times
Reputation: 2126

Advertisements

I'm guessing in Maryland it would be predominately Prince George's and Montgomery County. Though Baltimore has its fair share of problems, the only people who really look down on it are the transplants (not the natives) residing in those two aforementioned counties.

In Virginia, the obvious answer would be Northern VA, in particular Fairfax County. I actually hate when people from that part of the state talk down about people from Richmond. Richmond has some very nice areas and there is a lot of well to do people down in that part of the state.

For PA residents, I'm assuming more people would have an affinity for Pittsburgh that Philly since it is a smaller, somewhat more likable city and is home to the Steelers. The only part of PA that I think gets a truly bad rap is some of the counties and townships to the northeast of Harrisburg that are considered to be part of "coal country." I think "coal country" and the city of Reading are probably the most "hated" areas of the state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-29-2015, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,484,766 times
Reputation: 36100
Texas is big enough to have several candidates. Thete's the Rio Grande Valley, and the Panhandle, and Houston.

I quite like the RGV, people are friendly and unhurried. I've spent a lot of time there and I don't mind going back -- I could see myself living there.. I've been everywhere in the Panhandle, but just passing through,and haven't stopped there much. Houston is no worse than any other big city, and actually, I'd rather live in Houston than Dallas.

I grew up in Wisconsin, and I can't recall any part of the state being generally looked down upon. I suppose the "worst" that Wisconsin can offer would be the Paper Mill Towns, with their awful stink when driving through. Places like Nekoosa and Kimberley. And the Indian Reservation towns up north.



Quote:
Originally Posted by imbored198824 View Post
People from St. Louis think they have the best city. People from kc think they have the best city.
.
They're both right, but from very different reference points. They are as opposite as any two cities in America, both wonderful in their own opposite way.

Last edited by jtur88; 03-29-2015 at 08:49 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2015, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,401,162 times
Reputation: 29451
Quote:
Originally Posted by imbored198824 View Post
. . . I tend to think they are jealous of our southern accents . . .
Well that's a first...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2015, 12:08 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
2,320 posts, read 1,870,943 times
Reputation: 2308
For Ohio,

Dayton isnt well liked by many people I have talked to. It can be a depressing town and not a lot to offer. other then that, most of ohio seems to be fine. I cannot wait to move away from dayton!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2015, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 517,488 times
Reputation: 407
McKinley county, New Mexico. Specifically the Gallup Micrometropolitan area. It has probably the nicest scenery in the country, amidst low hog-backs, rugged red canyons, and pine savannah; nice people, hiking opportunities, good Native food, and serenity. But it also has a lack of services, an overabundance of "town drunks" in washes (I could never even exaggerate this part), snow in May, anomalous traffic jams, abandoned yellowcake mines, and some of the worst roads I have ever seen in this state.

I don't particularly hate it, but it's one of those few places that are at the top of the list of places to visit, but the bottom on the list of places to live. I've done both.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2015, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,393 posts, read 1,208,375 times
Reputation: 2588
For Minnesota, it's the entire western half of the state. There's just absolutely nothing out there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2015, 08:01 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,290,770 times
Reputation: 1656
In North Carolina, it's probably Cary. Cary has the most transplant saturated rep in the state (Containment Area for Relocated Yankees). It's also a glimpse of the direction many NC major metros have been heading down. Very vanilla, strip malls, family-oriented, soulless, losing southern/old-timey NC flavor as time goes by, filled with transplanted families from New York/New Jersey or Florida, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2015, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
128 posts, read 110,855 times
Reputation: 252
For people in eastern Massachusetts it's anything west of Worcester (Worcester and it's environs included). Even though its very inacurate people in eastern Mass think the central and western parts of the state are a combo of rural poverty and burned-out towns/cities.

Last edited by Southshorebound; 03-29-2015 at 08:40 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2015, 08:55 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,211,608 times
Reputation: 1329
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaySwelly View Post
Texas - If you're from Houston, you don't like DFW. If you're from DFW, you don't like Houston. Which one is more disliked? I would guess Dallas, because the more recognition you have the more haters you get. DFW has had recognition longer than Houston has, so people have had more time to make an opinion/come up with stereotypes and generalizations. I grew up in Arlington, and I've been to Midland, Odessa, Abilene, Tyler, Wichita Falls, Lubbock, Austin, Waco, San Antonio, Galveston, and Houston. Only place I've gotten negative comments about DFW was in Houston. I guess the Rio Grande Valley might be disliked because it's different than the rest of Texas.
Completely false.

Also, loads of people in Houston go about their lives without ever thinking of DFW, and vise versa.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Texas is big enough to have several candidates. Thete's the Rio Grande Valley, and the Panhandle, and Houston.

I quite like the RGV, people are friendly and unhurried. I've spent a lot of time there and I don't mind going back -- I could see myself living there.. I've been everywhere in the Panhandle, but just passing through,and haven't stopped there much. Houston is no worse than any other big city, and actually, I'd rather live in Houston than Dallas.
What makes you think that Houston in particular is a "hated" city in the state of Texas? Just curious as to the reasoning.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2015, 06:00 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,227 posts, read 18,027,785 times
Reputation: 14682
In Georgia, it's basically metro Atlanta versus most of the rest of the state, with Savannah being somewhat neutral. In metro Atlanta, it's "inside the Perimeter" (I-285) versus "outside the Perimeter." Or, if drawn along county lines, it's Fulton County and DeKalb County versus the rest of metro Atlanta (specifically Cobb County), and Clayton County versus everybody. Even within Fulton County, it's North Fulton versus the rest of the county. Over in Athens, there's a rift forming between Clarke County and Oconee County.

In Pennsylvania, it's traditionally been the Philadelphia metropolitan area versus the rest of the state, but lately it's increasingly eastern Pennsylvania versus western Pennsylvania. In eastern Pennsylvania, it's metro Philadelphia versus the smaller cities, and also the city of Philadelphia versus the rest of the metropolitan area, though relations there have improved. In western Pennsylvania, it's Pittsburgh and Allegheny County versus everybody else these days, in both the outlying metropolitan counties and the rural remainder of western Pennsylvania. Relations between Pittsburgh and Philadelphia used to be distant but have gradually improved.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top