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Old 05-21-2013, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
939 posts, read 1,262,805 times
Reputation: 760

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Most big cities have Hispanic neighborhoods, even in tiny Charlottesville, VA, there is a trailer park where the illegal immigrants live. But I'm wondering where in the U.S. are there entire tracts of 10,000+ people where you can't get by without speaking Spanish.

I know that Wikipedia has a list of cities by Spanish-speaking population:
List of U.S. cities by Spanish-speaking population - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

But you can't tell from these statistics whether the whole city is a mix of Spanish and English speakers and bilinguals, or whether there are large areas which are Spanish-only.

I'm thinking there are some obvious places: All of Puerto Rico, certain parts of South Florida in and near Miami, some places in and near Los Angeles, and the parts of Texas on the Rio Grande. Where else?
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Old 05-21-2013, 08:45 PM
 
1,519 posts, read 1,061,580 times
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Miami for sure. I have had a tough time buying a watch with an alarm function on South Beach using English. I HAD to switch to Spanish to tell the sales lady at Burdines (now Macy's) what I wanted.

I also had a lay-over at MIA and wanted to eat a vegetarian pizza. Again, I had to order in Spanish.

While staying at a hotel in South Beach, the manager was trying to call a company so that they could fix the front door. The first company did not have anyone in the office who spoke English. Same with the second. The manager was quite frustrated and angry. Alas, who works in Miami and doesn't speak any Spanish?

It also used to be that East Los Angeles conducted life in Spanish. I am not sure how much it has changed over the years as my experience with living in L.A. was quite a few years ago.
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Old 05-21-2013, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,190,591 times
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San Antonio is the biggest city proper i can think of.

Man, it was a pain loving there.
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Old 05-21-2013, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
939 posts, read 1,262,805 times
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All of San Antonio?

Is most of Miami Spanish-speaking, or only parts of it?
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Old 05-21-2013, 10:15 PM
 
5,767 posts, read 10,307,913 times
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There's a city south of Yuma called San Luis which has clashed with the state of Arizona several times over whether or not city officials need to be fluent in English:

Arizona Candidate Challenged Over English Skills

I haven't spent a great deal of time there, but from the time I have, Spanish is definitely helpful, if not vital.
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Old 05-21-2013, 10:47 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,822,626 times
Reputation: 11141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuselage View Post
Miami for sure. I have had a tough time buying a watch with an alarm function on South Beach using English. I HAD to switch to Spanish to tell the sales lady at Burdines (now Macy's) what I wanted.

I also had a lay-over at MIA and wanted to eat a vegetarian pizza. Again, I had to order in Spanish.

While staying at a hotel in South Beach, the manager was trying to call a company so that they could fix the front door. The first company did not have anyone in the office who spoke English. Same with the second. The manager was quite frustrated and angry. Alas, who works in Miami and doesn't speak any Spanish?

It also used to be that East Los Angeles conducted life in Spanish. I am not sure how much it has changed over the years as my experience with living in L.A. was quite a few years ago.
12 years in SouthBeach and I only speak English. I don't have any problems.
I shopped at Burdines (now Macy's), bought watches and ordered pizza.
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Old 05-21-2013, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,325,418 times
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When I moved to south Texas, I had hopes that maybe I could practice my Spanish But the Hispanics here don't want Anglos speaking Spanish to them, they want all the English practice they can get. Every once in a while, I encounter someone whose Spanish is not good enough yet, and I have to use Spanish, but that is very rare.

There are a few little agricultural towns of a few hundred people in South Texas where most people cannot speak English, But don't worry, you'll never be in one of those towns, they're pretty far off the beaten track.
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Old 05-22-2013, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Montgomery County, MD
3,240 posts, read 3,289,368 times
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Parts of Miami
San Antonio
Laredo
Brownsville
El Centro

border towns for the most part. Nearly everywhere else if a person has trouble, theyll go to someone they work with who speaks English. Those border towns in Texas give you no quarter though
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Old 05-22-2013, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,447 posts, read 11,948,134 times
Reputation: 10561
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
When I moved to south Texas, I had hopes that maybe I could practice my Spanish But the Hispanics here don't want Anglos speaking Spanish to them, they want all the English practice they can get. Every once in a while, I encounter someone whose Spanish is not good enough yet, and I have to use Spanish, but that is very rare.
Isn't it true that a lot of the older-school Tejanos (as opposed to recent Mexican immigrants) don't really speak Spanish well anyway? I had a friend who was 5th generation American from El Paso, and he told me his Spanish was so bad he preferred not to speak it at all for fear of embarrassing himself.
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Old 05-22-2013, 10:41 AM
 
483 posts, read 1,073,390 times
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Los Angeles
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