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Old 05-24-2013, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
7,992 posts, read 16,048,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post

I also do think Chicago is cheaper than Miami. More people want to move to Miami than Chicago, to escape the cold weather up north. So the real estate probably goes up. And there's not really a big middle ground in Miami between poor and rich, regarding neighborhoods.
According to this cost of living index, Philadelphia is more expensive than Miami and Chicago and Miami are almost exactly the same.

Also, do you have anything (aside from your own opinion) that can substantiate the bolded claim?
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Old 05-24-2013, 11:26 AM
 
Location: NYC Metro
126 posts, read 102,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
According to this cost of living index, Philadelphia is more expensive than Miami and Chicago and Miami are almost exactly the same.

Also, do you have anything (aside from your own opinion) that can substantiate the bolded claim?
philly is cheaper than chi, forget the col index, if u do extensive research on nhood by nhood basis, u will see
desirable nhoods are much more expensive in chi, while the ghetto ones are much cheaper and bring the average price down
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Old 05-24-2013, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,720 posts, read 1,400,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
According to this cost of living index, Philadelphia is more expensive than Miami and Chicago and Miami are almost exactly the same.

Also, do you have anything (aside from your own opinion) that can substantiate the bolded claim?
I highly doubt that Philadelphia is more expensive than Miami regardless of what that website says. I have family members that live in a perfectly safe and quiet neighborhood in Northeast Philadelphia and their home costs 85k. 85k in Miami would put you in the hood.
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Old 05-24-2013, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
5,302 posts, read 8,090,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
According to this cost of living index, Philadelphia is more expensive than Miami and Chicago and Miami are almost exactly the same.

Also, do you have anything (aside from your own opinion) that can substantiate the bolded claim?
Yes, Florida gained the most 'immigrants' from other states after Texas and California. It can be assumed that the majority of this new group moved to Miami, or the Miami metro area.
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Old 05-24-2013, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
5,302 posts, read 8,090,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
People have mentioned a few things. My two cents.

1. Weather has nothing to do with it. After all, Philly is between two highly expensive, desirable cities (DC and NYC), and has an intermediate climate.

2. I think jobs play a role. I know that in the case of Philly it has far less jobs within the city limits than residents - in part due to a high commuter tax. This means fewer people even have the option to relocate due to applying for a job long distance, and it's not a great place to move with no job lined up. I don't know as much about Chicago - I think it has a better job market, but it's not the same as NYC or DC of course.

3. Chicago and Philadelphia are still around half ghetto or near-ghetto, which brings down average prices. Besides DC, the proportion of the most expensive major cities which is bad neighborhoods is now significantly less than half.
Weather does have something to do with price. Why is San Diego so expensive, or LA? More specifically, what's the reason people want to move to San Diego? The weather, the beaches, the scenery, the palms. We call it the Sunshine Tax. If you took away the weather, people wouldn't be drawn to San Diego as much, because it wouldn't have as much to offer. LA? The weather/beauty has something to do with the price, but if you took it away, it still offers a lot of cultural things and plenty of activities to do, so it'd remain expensive. And also, look at the Florida Keys and Hawaii. Expensive to live there? Why? The weather, scenery, beaches, etc.
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Old 05-24-2013, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,913,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawaii4evr View Post
Weather does have something to do with price. Why is San Diego so expensive, or LA? More specifically, what's the reason people want to move to San Diego? The weather, the beaches, the scenery, the palms. We call it the Sunshine Tax. If you took away the weather, people wouldn't be drawn to San Diego as much, because it wouldn't have as much to offer. LA? The weather/beauty has something to do with the price, but if you took it away, it still offers a lot of cultural things and plenty of activities to do, so it'd remain expensive. And also, look at the Florida Keys and Hawaii. Expensive to live there? Why? The weather, scenery, beaches, etc.
Someplace like the Florida Keys, or resort towns in general, are one thing. They get so desirable that those who don't need jobs buy a lot of real estate. So you have second homes, the idle super-rich, and somewhat wealthy retirees taking up a lot of the real estate. This isn't just a warm climate thing either - it happens places like Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts as well.

But the vast majority of people need to work to live. They don't just move across the country without any job lined up (New York City is the only place I've ever heard of someone doing that). If they can't find a job one place, they look somewhere else. I've known a lot of job-desperate people just out of school who relocated places with great trepidation they ended up hating (Phoenix say, or suburban Maryland) because that was where they could get their foot in the door.

But yeah, rich people can distort the real estate market lots of places. I wouldn't consider San Francisco to have a great climate, but it's gotten so desirable that people are buying second homes there they leave empty much of the year. Rich people are distorting the market hugely in places like NYC, DC, and Boston, which I would guess you would say don't have good climates (I could never imagine not living somewhere with a winter personally).

So more broadly, I think you could say that since Philly and Chicago don't have a broad appeal to the international idle rich, that probably depresses prices a bit. But I still say things like a weak urban job market, and large ghettos, play a bigger role.
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Old 05-24-2013, 12:49 PM
 
Location: NYC Metro
126 posts, read 102,486 times
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i dont kno if ghettos is such a big deal, every city has them, uglier or prettier, they are still ghettos and u wudnt wan live there anyway
compton looks way better than camden, but most people wudnt wan live in compton either
i lived in portland, OR b4, one of the cleanest cities, and theres quite a few shady places there i wudnt wan live or had to be careful at night too, places where homes have bars on windows, drug dealers and addicts lurking, prostitute activity, etc
so in the big scheme this should not play a big role

Last edited by do sum'n; 05-24-2013 at 12:59 PM..
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Old 05-24-2013, 01:30 PM
 
5,835 posts, read 10,779,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by do sum'n View Post
so the question is why does chicago have more available, cheaper land then?
Good question, and one that one has answered or addressed yet.

The reason for this is basically that Chicago was much more a major industrial city more than the cities on the coasts. While other cities had a lot of industrial land, Chicago and Detroit were Americas industrial powerhouses. Chicagos factory-railroad, etc. complexes took up a LOT of land, including land on the edge of the loop, some which is still there, even after the huge construction boom.

Chicago, of course because of its economic diversity and political will, of course did not become Detroit, but certainly came close in the 70s and 80s, and the same way that people go to Detroit to photograph urban decay today, it wasn't that long ago, where you could easily find some of this in Chicago. So, meetpacking plants closed, steel mills closed, railyards and warehouses by downtown closed and were disused, even with the beautiful lakefront, Chicago even by the rivers mouth was a small pocket of industrial use on the lakefront.

Sure, Boston had its textile mills, and NYC had a industy and then its inevitable blight, but not like Chicago. DC was really never a major industrial city. San Francisco and Oakland certainly had/has its industrial docklands, and LA is a major manufacturing city which has also gone through some adjustments to its economy, but Chicago stands alone, in having a blank slate to work with, with its factories, warehouses, and railyards, and surrounding neighborhoods that were partially vacated.

that were empty space to rebuild the more contemporary city.

Look at the South Loop on Google earth for example, that huge urban prairie was a railyard at one time:

South Loop, Chicago, IL - Google Maps

Heres the Brachs candy factory and the vacated surrounding neighborhood on the west side. All this gives Chicago the space to rebuild and why it has the space which makes it cheaper.

West Garfield Park, Chicago, IL - Google Maps

West Garfield Park, Chicago, IL - Google Maps

Here is where the Mayor Daley the first decades ago, had land bought up on the near west side to expand the Medical center, it gave Chicago a world class medical center, but it bought up too much land and cleared away too much of a neighborhood:

Illinois Medical Center - Google Maps

Even the Cabrini Green projects, now some of the hottest real estate also provided empty space, even to have an urban farm:

Cabrini Green - Google Maps
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Old 05-24-2013, 01:35 PM
 
Location: NYC Metro
126 posts, read 102,486 times
Reputation: 53
they got a farm in the place of cabrini? damn thats crazy
nice explanation tho
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Old 05-24-2013, 09:27 PM
 
24 posts, read 51,432 times
Reputation: 55
to the OP: because nobody wants to live there.
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