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Old 05-31-2013, 05:30 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
1,168 posts, read 2,538,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
In that they are the best places to live for both affordability and progressiveness/liberalism.
I agree that Columbus is fairly liberal and progressive, but Indianapolis is one of the most conservative major cities in the Midwest.

Last edited by jayp1188; 05-31-2013 at 05:39 AM..
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Old 05-31-2013, 05:38 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
1,168 posts, read 2,538,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by streetcreed View Post
I agree with Indianapolis, but Columbus is a city with many things in common with Denver, Austin, and Portland. It has a good economy, if progressive, young/young professional, has a hip downtown area, and many great urban neighborhoods.

For a city with a low cost of living it is one of the most rare ones that also has a good economy and vibrant older neighborhoods. After DC and Boston Columbus' metro/city are growing faster than anywhere else in the midwest or NE. I would say Austin and Columbus have the best balance between a happening city and lower cost of living with a very strong economy.
Columbus is fine, but it really isn't that comparable with Denver, Austin, and Portland. When it comes to things that make a city "cool" such as the local music scenes, culinary scenes, local art scene, etc., it really falls short of those three cities. This may be due to Denver, Austin, and Portland being able to attract people from all over the country, whereas Columbus largely just attracts people from the rest of Ohio and some bordering states. Columbus has not in any way established itself as an "it" city the way Denver, Austin, and Portland have. For the most part Columbus is far more similar to Indianapolis, which is why I would not include Columbus as a suggestion for someone who wants to live in a cool urban environment.
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Old 05-31-2013, 05:46 AM
 
Location: Bronx, New York
2,141 posts, read 2,575,556 times
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I thought Joe wanted urban? What's urban about upstate NY? Joe could share a 1 bedroom in the less nice areas of the Bronx, Brooklyn, or Queens. The neighborhood might be sketchy but you can get to Manhattan from anywhere in the 5 boroughs in less than an hour.
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Old 05-31-2013, 05:55 AM
 
567 posts, read 913,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasper03 View Post
I thought Joe wanted urban? What's urban about upstate NY? Joe could share a 1 bedroom in the less nice areas of the Bronx, Brooklyn, or Queens. The neighborhood might be sketchy but you can get to Manhattan from anywhere in the 5 boroughs in less than an hour.
What if he moved to Jersey City or something? Isn't that even closer?
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Old 05-31-2013, 06:13 AM
 
Location: Bronx, New York
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Not necessarily...depends on where in Manhattan he needs to go if that's where he is going to be working. Monthly path train fare is $73/month and then he will likely need a metro card $112/month. This guy only makes $11/hour and of course that's only if he gets a place close to the station. If not then he will have to pay to travel to the path station.

If Joe worked in upper Manhattan he would be better off in the Bronx...commute would be under 45 minutes from even the N. Bronx. If he worked in Midtown then Queens would give him a commute under an hour. If he worked in lower Manhattan Brooklyn would be best. If lives far from the subway...the metro card covers the bus transfers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalLord View Post
What if he moved to Jersey City or something? Isn't that even closer?

Last edited by Jasper03; 05-31-2013 at 06:23 AM..
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Old 05-31-2013, 06:47 AM
 
56,813 posts, read 81,169,050 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasper03 View Post
I thought Joe wanted urban? What's urban about upstate NY? Joe could share a 1 bedroom in the less nice areas of the Bronx, Brooklyn, or Queens. The neighborhood might be sketchy but you can get to Manhattan from anywhere in the 5 boroughs in less than an hour.
I take it that you haven't been to any of the cities in Upstate NY.
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Old 05-31-2013, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Bronx, New York
2,141 posts, read 2,575,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I take it that you haven't been to any of the cities in Upstate NY.
You are correct. Syracuse, Binghamtom, and Rochester are the biggest cities upstate, right? Kind of off the radar for downstate people and very far away from Manhattan. With his $11/hour day trips to NYC will be far and few between.
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Old 05-31-2013, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,334,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayp1188 View Post
I agree that Columbus is fairly liberal and progressive, but Indianapolis is one of the most conservative major cities in the Midwest.
They often get lumped together, so I said both.....Indy is also growing moderately fast, like Columbus, so in that sense it's progressive (progressively growing and changing, not progressively political).
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Old 05-31-2013, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,334,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayp1188 View Post
Columbus is fine, but it really isn't that comparable with Denver, Austin, and Portland. When it comes to things that make a city "cool" such as the local music scenes, culinary scenes, local art scene, etc., it really falls short of those three cities. This may be due to Denver, Austin, and Portland being able to attract people from all over the country, whereas Columbus largely just attracts people from the rest of Ohio and some bordering states. Columbus has not in any way established itself as an "it" city the way Denver, Austin, and Portland have. For the most part Columbus is far more similar to Indianapolis, which is why I would not include Columbus as a suggestion for someone who wants to live in a cool urban environment.
Columbus reminds me quite a bit of Austin, actually. Both are big-time college towns that act like college towns but are large metros. Both are liberal and "hip". Both are growing. Yes, Columbus does not have anywhere near the same level as attractiveness as Austin right now, but few cities do. I've been to both cities and can say that Austin is not above and beyond Columbus by most measures (it does have a better music scene though, but that's no surprise).
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Old 05-31-2013, 11:12 AM
 
56,813 posts, read 81,169,050 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasper03 View Post
You are correct. Syracuse, Binghamtom, and Rochester are the biggest cities upstate, right? Kind of off the radar for downstate people and very far away from Manhattan. With his $11/hour day trips to NYC will be far and few between.
It's Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, Albany and Schenectady for the 5 biggest cities in Upstate NY and in that order. Interestingly, Schenectady is the most dense in terms of population out of the 5 and added 5000 people between 2000-2010.

My point is that he wouldn't have to go to NYC for an urban environment. Look up neighborhoods like Elmwood village and Allentown in Buffalo, Park Ave, South Wedge and Monroe Village in Rochester, Armory Square or even Westcott in Syracuse, Lark Street/Center Square and Delaware Ave. in Albany and Union Street in Schenectady. There are others, but those are some that could work for the OP if he were to consider those cities. Ithaca could work, as could Corning, with its Gaffer District. Utica has Varick Street, Downtown Troy and so on.

For instance, while a bit on the small side, something like this could work: http://www.longley-jones.com/apts/?m...et1&id=115&c=1

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 05-31-2013 at 11:35 AM..
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