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Old 05-29-2013, 03:13 PM
 
Location: NJ
690 posts, read 809,147 times
Reputation: 141

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Eh... You aren't going to find serious hills in a metro that big in the Midwest. Only rolling hills at best. You can find excellent hills around some of the cities, but not in them. If you want hills going straight up out of valleys and such inside a big city (Like LA or Nashville or Pittsburgh, etc.), you gotta look outside of the Midwest.

Then again, you may only be looking for a rather gentle roll.

Correction: Other than Cincinnati. Looks like that's your dream come true.
as long as its not completely flat, its ok
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Old 05-29-2013, 03:33 PM
 
Location: NJ
690 posts, read 809,147 times
Reputation: 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
Alton is part of the St. Louis metro.
gotcha
so is st louis a good choice?
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Old 05-29-2013, 03:59 PM
 
6,127 posts, read 6,452,250 times
Reputation: 6544
Quote:
Originally Posted by wnewberry22 View Post
Omaha is about as hilly as freshly pressed pair of slacks.

Same goes for Lincoln.

I would suggest Rapid City, SD
Rapid City is not Midwestern. While it is quite hilly and sunny, once you get out of the Black Hills it's not necessarily very green. It's also a fairly small metro and somewhat isolated.
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Old 05-29-2013, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Chicago(Northside)
3,719 posts, read 6,100,623 times
Reputation: 1651
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Williamsport, Pittsburgh, Ithaca, Elmira, Corning, Montpelier, Roanoke, Nashville, Birmingham... the list goes on. :/
I saw a couple of other posts by you in this thread. I noticed you kept skipping over cincinnati. Do you have something against it, anyway the cities you listed are no where near as big as cincinnati, pittsburgh and san Fran which are probably the hilliest cities in america.
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Old 05-29-2013, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,744,569 times
Reputation: 5379
Quote:
Originally Posted by cali3448893 View Post
I saw a couple of other posts by you in this thread. I noticed you kept skipping over cincinnati. Do you have something against it, anyway the cities you listed are no where near as big as cincinnati, pittsburgh and san Fran which are probably the hilliest cities in america.
Well for one thing Cincy was already mentioned so it wasn't necessary. Second when I did actually forget about it I quite clearly went back and edited my post. Thirdly I don't care for your accusing tone nor your general assumptions about what cities contain more hills than others.
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Old 05-29-2013, 11:31 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,224 posts, read 17,978,149 times
Reputation: 14673
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Moore, OKlahoma is not the Midwest. It's the South. Oklahoma is a Southern state in its entirety. And Joplin is on the border of Midwestern and Southern.
Oklahoma is like West Virginia; it doesn't belong to one region of the country entirely. South of I-44 and east of U.S. 75, Oklahoma becomes more like the Mid-South. West of U.S. 81, it becomes gradually more like the West. The rest of the state is most like the Lower Midwest/Great Plains.
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Old 05-29-2013, 11:39 PM
 
Location: Battle Creek, MI
494 posts, read 674,133 times
Reputation: 258
Heck there is some decent hills in this area of Southern Michigan. Elevations range between 650 feet ( at lake shore ) up to around 1,100 feet ( not far from Jackson MI ) above sea level. This city has alot of hills but it is a small city. Ofcourse most of the city's are small and mid sized where alot of the hills are. Gets more hilly the further north you go in MI but ala the population decreases as well.

Just east of Columbus, OH ( far east burbs ) are pretty hilly as well. Basically along/east of I-71 ( Into PA/WV/KY ) is hilly.
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Old 05-29-2013, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Battle Creek, MI
494 posts, read 674,133 times
Reputation: 258
Traditionally the Midwest is considered MN, IA, MO, WI, IL, MI, IN, OH..

The plains are considered ND, SD, NE, KS, OK, TX..

Ohio Valley is for areas along and south of I70 east of St. Louis to Pittsburgh including KY.
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Old 05-30-2013, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,232,832 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBeagleLady View Post
Rapid City is not Midwestern. While it is quite hilly and sunny, once you get out of the Black Hills it's not necessarily very green. It's also a fairly small metro and somewhat isolated.
Just because it's not green, it can't be the Midwest? That's like saying just because Oklahoma and Texas are treeless prairie, they cant' be Southern. Based on one characteristic you think it's not the Midwest. Just when you can't jump to conclusions any quicker
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Old 05-30-2013, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,232,832 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarryBTL View Post
Traditionally the Midwest is considered MN, IA, MO, WI, IL, MI, IN, OH..

The plains are considered ND, SD, NE, KS, OK, TX..

Ohio Valley is for areas along and south of I70 east of St. Louis to Pittsburgh including KY.
The plains are not one continguous region. Oklahoma and TExas are very much culturally, demographically, and linguistically akin to the Southern states. Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North DAkota are very much culturally, demographically, and linguistically akin to the Midwestern states.
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