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Old 06-14-2013, 05:06 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Those two countries are part of the Commonwealth of Nations and recognize the Queen as their monarch.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commonwealth_of_Nations

Much of the US was never part of England. My husband's home state of Nebraska was once a part of France. Our current home of 33 years and home state of our children, Colorado, was once part of Spain. I am from Pennsylvania but my family is of German origin, and my mother was from Wisconsin, once also a part of France. A lot of us don't give a **** about the British.

Yes they are part of the commonwealth because they did not go through the trouble of overthrowing the King like we did. We pride ourselves on having done that and for that reason many don't like to be reminded that England still is the foundation this nation was built upon. Our system of law, our language even many of our traditions come from our British founders. Even parts of the US that never saw the union jack fly over them (like the southwest) are still influenced by the British since English is the language spoken everywhere in this nation. Also our system of law is based on the English system as much in Arizona as it is in New England. Whether or not you like the British influence is a personal choice, but it is un-deniable that the Brits greatly influenced the development of the USA.
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Old 06-14-2013, 05:45 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Katiana
Those two countries are part of the Commonwealth of Nations and recognize the Queen as their monarch.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commonwealth_of_Nations

Much of the US was never part of England. My husband's home state of Nebraska was once a part of France. Our current home of 33 years and home state of our children, Colorado, was once part of Spain. I am from Pennsylvania but my family is of German origin, and my mother was from Wisconsin, once also a part of France. A lot of us don't give a **** about the British.


^

How is that relevant? What was the population of those regions prior to the, Louisiana purchase? A few thousand?

It was the people of the 13 original colonies that populated it, bringing with them the dominant culture of Colonial America -- British.


Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Yes they are part of the commonwealth because they did not go through the trouble of overthrowing the King like we did. We pride ourselves on having done that and for that reason many don't like to be reminded that England still is the foundation this nation was built upon. Our system of law, our language even many of our traditions come from our British founders. Even parts of the US that never saw the union jack fly over them (like the southwest) are still influenced by the British since English is the language spoken everywhere in this nation. Also our system of law is based on the English system as much in Arizona as it is in New England. Whether or not you like the British influence is a personal choice, but it is un-deniable that the Brits greatly influenced the development of the USA.
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Old 06-14-2013, 06:41 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,132 posts, read 9,903,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Those two countries are part of the Commonwealth of Nations and recognize the Queen as their monarch.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commonwealth_of_Nations

Much of the US was never part of England. My husband's home state of Nebraska was once a part of France. Our current home of 33 years and home state of our children, Colorado, was once part of Spain. I am from Pennsylvania but my family is of German origin, and my mother was from Wisconsin, once also a part of France. A lot of us don't give a **** about the British.
Everything you said is true Katiana, and even my home state was started by the Dutch. But after all that, what language do we speak?
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Old 06-14-2013, 07:23 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,996 posts, read 102,581,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Everything you said is true Katiana, and even my home state was started by the Dutch. But after all that, what language do we speak?
Why, we speak English! OMG! I never thought of that!

However, we do not have an entirely British legal system. In many western states and Minnesota, marital property is considered "community property", a takeoff on the Spanish system.

Community property - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 06-14-2013, 07:41 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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The cultural connections between the United States and Great Britain are STRONG. I would also add with Canada and the Aussies. Just think of movies, music, actors, comedians, authors.

This past year, we had a British actor get an academy award for the most realistic portrayal of Abraham Lincoln probably ever done before. A few years before that we had two British actors, portraying founding fathers Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson in the HBO mini series John Adams.

Think of how many Hollywood films have been inspired by British literature.

The Lord of the Rings
The Harry Potter series
The War of the Worlds
The Chronicles of Narnia (The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe)
Peter Pan
Frankenstein
Dracula
Pride and Prejudice
Oliver Twist
Robinson Crusoe
Gulliver's Travels
The Hobbit
The Jungle Books
The Time Machine
War Horse
King Kong (Edgar Wallace)
Animal Farm
Brideshead Revisited
Lord of the Flies
Sense And Sensibility
Vanity Fair
A Christmas Carol
Treasure Island
David Copperfield
Wuthering Heights
The Wind in the Willows
Alice in Wonderland
Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
The Importance of Being Earnest
A Tale of Two Cities
The Hound of the Baskervilles (and other Sherlock Holmes)
The Invisible Man
A Clockwork Orange
One Hundred and One Dalmatians
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (Willy Wonka)
The French Lieutenant's Woman
Black Beauty
Doctor Dolittle
How to Train Your Dragon
The Indian in the Cupboard
Little Lord Fauntleroy
Lassie
Winnie the Pooh
Jack the Giant Killer
The Adventures of Robin Hood
King Arthur and the Knights of the Roundtable
Shakespeare (numerous)

So many others. Try to imagine Americans making a series of a dozen movies about a secret agent from Russia. Or a German one. Not bloody likely. But they have a made a series for 50 years about James Bond, Agent 007. That's because we can identify with the Brits.

Let someone else do British rock and roll, LOL.
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Old 06-14-2013, 12:41 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^It's not because we identify with the Brits, it's because the Brits are part of the "good guys". The Russians and Germans, not so much. And it's not as if there aren't plenty of movies about them. WW II seems to be a subject that will always be of interest to many. DH just watched "Ice Station Zebra" a movie about the US and the old USSR the other night.

You might think, sitting there in New York with all your British names, etc, that it's that way everywhere in the US, but there are many parts of the country where people just don't relate to the Brits. There was another thread about this, where some Brit called England "the mother country". I asked my daughter, Colorado born and bred, who had just returned from England, if she agreed with this and she said, "My state used to be a part of Mexico!" Even my part of PA, in the way western part of the state bordering Ohio, the dominant culture was Scotch-Irish, not British. Whiskey Rebellion country and all that.
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Old 06-14-2013, 01:01 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Even my part of PA, in the way western part of the state bordering Ohio, the dominant culture was Scotch-Irish, not British. Whiskey Rebellion country and all that.
Scotch-Irish is part of British culture.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post

You might think, sitting there in New York with all your British names, etc, that it's that way everywhere in the US, but there are many parts of the country where people just don't relate to the Brits.
The New York area, having the most immigrants in the 19th and 20th centuries, is one of the least British (excluding Irish) in the country. A 1960 study estimated 5% of the population was of English ancestry.
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Old 06-14-2013, 02:53 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,238 posts, read 19,536,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Those two countries are part of the Commonwealth of Nations and recognize the Queen as their monarch.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commonwealth_of_Nations

Much of the US was never part of England. My husband's home state of Nebraska was once a part of France. Our current home of 33 years and home state of our children, Colorado, was once part of Spain. I am from Pennsylvania but my family is of German origin, and my mother was from Wisconsin, once also a part of France. A lot of us don't give a **** about the British.
This makes sense. I've noticed that the British influence in America is the strongest on the east coast. This is where the old establishment of America had its roots and is still located.

The British influence wanes considerably as you head to other regions of the country.
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Old 06-14-2013, 03:10 PM
 
571 posts, read 390,406 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hipcat View Post
It seems to me that the British influence of this country is weak. Very few of the most common foods we eat are of British origin. The most popular sports are totally different. And its seems the me that the strongest British influences are at governmental level.

So how strong is the British influence in the US?


Whenever I encounter Brits through the internet who carp about how they “created America,” I usually reply like this:“Oh really, since when was the UK a democratic Republic with an elected head of state and a written constitution?”


Correct answer: None of the above

Even on the governmental level the Brits didn’t leave us very much.

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Old 06-14-2013, 03:52 PM
 
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I pointed this out on another thread, but I thinks its sort of interesting that the US has plenty of ethnic festivals from different immigrant groups over history--but absolutely nothing to celebrate specifically "English" heritage. Just among the British Isles, in the US there are tons of Irish festivals and events, there's Scottish festivals, there's Welsh festivals, there's some Scots-Irish Festivals, and even a few Cornish festivals... But look up "English Festival" and you'll just be directed to sites for celebrations of English literature. There isn't one celebration of St. George's Day in this country that I know of. So Americans of other British ethnicities still have cultural events, though English culture isn’t' seen in that same light...

So for the reason the English made up the majority of the early white US population(among the earlier arriving Scots-Irish, Germans and so on and dwarfed by the black slave population), they simply became synonymous with American. Everyone else who came later became the others and had to wait to prove themselves to become "American". So while there's a lot of English contributions to American culture--we just tend to overlook them as being American. We don't find them particularly exotic. Even an English-themed pub in the US, is often just a theme. When English people move to the US, we just expect them to live where ever they like. There's not been specific "English" neighborhoods unlike say specific Irish neighborhoods that are still around that have been around in some parts for over a hundred years or more. So not just talking about British culture, but in specifically English culture--we're heavily influenced by it--yet we're so influenced by it that we hardly notice. But the historical culture of the English isn't seen as something to search out... No one goes out for English food in the US...

Presenting Shakespeare in the park isn't seen as some exotic foreign culture--it's sort of a staple of the arts in the US. Same thing with British rock music--when you hear a German or French band from today or days past--people will often think of that fact to define them. People think of the Beatles and Led Zeppelin as British or English bands, but no one defines them solely by their nationality--and the fact is that they were as influenced by American music as anything else. It's almost as much a part of our culture as that of the UK. So there's always been a lot of cultural interplay between the two nations--yet as far as looking at other elements of traditional English culture--it's not something that has a broad range in the modern US...

Last edited by Deezus; 06-14-2013 at 05:00 PM..
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