U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-15-2013, 11:38 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082

Advertisements

^^The picture is cherry-picked, to fit in with the title of the article, but the article also gave stats.

I've never been to England. I've been to western Europe, and the countryside in W. Germany looks somewhat like PA. The tulips fields in the Netherlands looked like the cornfields in IL, except much prettier. (Tulips were in bloom when we were there.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-15-2013, 11:40 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,998,698 times
Reputation: 14810
The UK also has the most pro-unregulated free market political culture in Europe. The political culture is more familiar to an American. A Margaret Thatcher free market conservative would be unlikely in continental Europe, and there's more of a culture of capitalism a force to be tamed in continental Europe. It also had the closest resembling a two party system in Europe, and the least prone to illiberal, anti-freedom policies. Unlike much of Europe, there was never much of a fascist or communist movement nor the tradition of revolutionary violence. The UK has the highest income inequality in Western Europe, closest to the US, and has the most decayed rust-belt cities. The cities also built in a way that they tend to avoid apartment blocks, unlike many older continental European cities, but similar to many American ones, though they have lots and lots of rowhouses, not unlike older parts of eastern PA. Its mill architecture resembles New England, though yes, British influence is more obvious here.

In many ways, a lot of what makes the US unique is what made the UK somewhat different from the rest of continental Europe and taken to its extreme once the settlers were free to create a new society.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2013, 03:25 PM
 
350 posts, read 608,378 times
Reputation: 352
I always wondered why some states have the word Commonwealth in their official name like The Commonwealth of Virginia or The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. I guess these names come from the colonial era but why other states don't have this and why they kept the name.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2013, 12:20 AM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,145,777 times
Reputation: 809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
The Scotch-Irish are a part of UK culture, which did not exist at the time of the revolution, when PA was being settled. The Scotch-Irish did not care for the Brits. They were overwhelmingly Presbyterian, and the Brits came up with some requirement that "all crown officials be of the Anglican faith; this regulation eventually included all those in the military, or employed by civil service, municipal corporations, and educational institutions. The Scots-Irish, devoutly Presbyterian, were not only excluded from any sort of power, even their clergy was stripped of its authority to perform marriages. (Thus the genealogist seeking information may need to look at Anglican marriage records.)"
The Scots-Irish in the Southern United States: An Overview | Katharine Garstka
King George actually referred to the American Revolution as a "Presbyterian rebellion." I've read that this was because the bulk of the American fighting force was Scots-Irish. However, it's possible that "Presbyterian" could be used as a catchall for those Protestants who opposed the Church of England, so it would include the New England Calvinists as well (the other major force of the Revolution). Many of the leaders were Anglican, but that seemed less important to the British than the fact that the fighting force was protestant.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2013, 12:49 AM
 
1,100 posts, read 1,379,713 times
Reputation: 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Yes they are part of the commonwealth because they did not go through the trouble of overthrowing the King like we did. We pride ourselves on having done that and for that reason many don't like to be reminded that England still is the foundation this nation was built upon.
In the case of Australia, the British loosened the reigns fairly quickly once the first signs of rebellion emerged. In Victoria a series of skirmishes between the colonial government and gold miners, (essentially over the issue of taxation without representation) culminated in open battle at Ballarat. The rebels received widespread public support when tried, and the jury failed to find them guilty of any crime. The result, almost immediate introduction of an elected legislature. A comparatively short time later, moves to create Australia, as an independent nation comprised of former British colonies began.

Last edited by Richard1098; 06-20-2013 at 12:59 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-19-2018, 03:03 PM
 
2 posts, read 557 times
Reputation: 10
I'm afraid you are denying the obvious. Every institution, and basis of law, concept of democracy and free market economics on which the US is founded has roots in Britain. Your language and culture from Shakespeare, Dickens, to the Beatles originate in Britain. All but three of the US presidents are of British origin and all but two of the signatories of the Declaration of Independence are of British heritage.

Pretty much every American of any consequence has British heritage from Bill Gates to Henry Ford to Neil Armstrong. There are no Italian or Hispanic or Scandinavian heritage Presidents and in my recollection only one Dutch and one German.

The most democratic and prosperous countries in the world and those that have made the greatest contributions to the world are Britain and its English speaking former colonies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-19-2018, 03:26 PM
 
2 posts, read 557 times
Reputation: 10
I'm beginning to think that you have not thought this one through and have an agenda in not accepting the blatantly obvious.

Firstly Britain has an NHS but then all Western European democracies have similar models based on universal healthcare. So are you saying that the US mirrors Germany or Sweden but not the UK? The very reason you are aware of the NHS is because the US constantly looks to Britain and not so much to the rest of Europe. Similarly Britain's welfare system mirrors that of the rest of Western Europe and church attendance and marriage has declined throughout Western Europe. Your comment that US relates more similarly to Australia and Canada is also confused. The reason for this and the common link?..... Former British colonies perhaps. LOL.
But your comments contrasting densely populated Britain with sparsely populated US are quite laughable. Are you not familiar with the concept of migrants from the old world pioneering the new where land was plentiful and free? You are siting the very reason the new world was pioneered in the first place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-19-2018, 03:39 PM
 
2,006 posts, read 1,022,430 times
Reputation: 2672
Quote:
Originally Posted by ian stamps View Post
I'm afraid you are denying the obvious. Every institution, and basis of law, concept of democracy and free market economics on which the US is founded has roots in Britain. Your language and culture from Shakespeare, Dickens, to the Beatles originate in Britain. All but three of the US presidents are of British origin and all but two of the signatories of the Declaration of Independence are of British heritage.

Pretty much every American of any consequence has British heritage from Bill Gates to Henry Ford to Neil Armstrong. There are no Italian or Hispanic or Scandinavian heritage Presidents and in my recollection only one Dutch and one German.

The most democratic and prosperous countries in the world and those that have made the greatest contributions to the world are Britain and its English speaking former colonies.
An easy statement to make, while naming three persons of consequence. Attached are a couple persons of consequence, of German heritage. (Neil Armstrong is one).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_German_Americans
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-19-2018, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,093 posts, read 5,918,284 times
Reputation: 30347
Quote:
Originally Posted by optimusprime69 View Post
i'd agree it's pretty weak, rather i think the us influences britain more than britain influences us

this....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-19-2018, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Kent, UK/ Rhode Island, US
626 posts, read 576,122 times
Reputation: 711
Very weak. Last time the UK had a significant infuence on the US was in the 19th century.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top