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Old 05-29-2013, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,333 posts, read 10,303,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
How strong is British influence in the U.S.?

How about... our language, our literature, our music, our government, our political system, our legal system and our economic system - for starters?
Huge difference between European and British style parliamentary govt vs the constantly divided and fractious splitting of powers in the US presidential system.
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Old 05-29-2013, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,333 posts, read 10,303,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Awe they must make your life so rough...
You'll make it through this. I promise

No, more frustrating when their quack politicians block needed legislation.
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Old 05-29-2013, 10:01 PM
 
12,657 posts, read 10,497,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I would say the other northern states that formed the original 13 colonies like PA, NY and NJ would be a close second behind New England. When I first visited England I was struck how similar the neighborhoods of English cities were to Philly neighborhoods. Philly was a very British city during the colonial era. People here welcomed the British Occupation during the Rev War.
Agreed. Many of NJ's towns and streets are named after British people or places. You'll find a lot of British and old American history weaved through PA, NY, and NJ, absolutely. There were places in NJ that harbored British soldiers during the Revolutionary War while other places harbored Washington and his troops.

The original 13 colonies/the states they are today are still influenced by Britain, but it's an older, permanent kind of influence - language obviously, streets/towns/cities that were named somehow after Britain in the 1600s and 1700s, etc.
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Old 05-29-2013, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Both coasts
1,582 posts, read 4,289,321 times
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the US and the UK are on completely opposite ends of a "cultural spectrum" of Anglophone countries.

Australia, NZ, South Africa, Ireland, Canada are all kinda in the middle of the 2.

I don't believe there is much British influence at all in the US.
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Old 05-29-2013, 10:09 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,710,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
No, more frustrating when their quack politicians block needed legislation.
Humans will agree or disagree on many issues, its a part of life.
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Old 05-29-2013, 10:16 PM
 
12,657 posts, read 10,497,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
the US and the UK are on completely opposite ends of a "cultural spectrum" of Anglophone countries.

Australia, NZ, South Africa, Ireland, Canada are all kinda in the middle of the 2.

I don't believe there is much British influence at all in the US.
Other than more mundane things like language (important, yes, but British and American English are so so different from one another today anyway) and names towns, cities, and streets in the Northeast and Southeast that got their names during British occupation and therefore will likely never change, there isn't.
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Old 05-29-2013, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,333 posts, read 10,303,665 times
Reputation: 5400
Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
the US and the UK are on completely opposite ends of a "cultural spectrum" of Anglophone countries.

Australia, NZ, South Africa, Ireland, Canada are all kinda in the middle of the 2.

I don't believe there is much British influence at all in the US.
If there were, we would have universal national health insurance like Canada, NZ, and Australia. The people of those countries share pretty much the same values as the British people. So much of the US is just so far far away from those countries on so many issues. Guns and healthcare come immediately to mind.
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Old 05-30-2013, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Hollywood, CA
1,576 posts, read 2,536,238 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
If there were, we would have universal national health insurance like Canada, NZ, and Australia. The people of those countries share pretty much the same values as the British people. So much of the US is just so far far away from those countries on so many issues. Guns and healthcare come immediately to mind.
The US sticks out like a sore thumb from the other Anglosphere nations. Even Canada is more British influenced.
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Old 05-30-2013, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,143,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I would say the other northern states that formed the original 13 colonies like PA, NY and NJ would be a close second behind New England. When I first visited England I was struck how similar the neighborhoods of English cities were to Philly neighborhoods. Philly was a very British city during the colonial era. People here welcomed the British Occupation during the Rev War.
Philadelphia is very Quaker in design and British in architecture, but you're misrepresenting the reaction to the British occupation. Philadelphia was a largely pacifist city. Not only were there English Quakers, but there were Germans (Mennonites, Annabaptists, etc.) and Dutch and other Quakers too. So, they were ok with whoever. However, a New Englander by the name of Ben Franklin did provide some organization to fill the void left by the Quakers. Also, Philadelphia was the primary gateway for Ulster Scots, who did put up a defense of the city.

By the way, the English were not a majority in PA at the time of the Revolution (just a plurality). Germans were a significant minority.
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Old 06-01-2013, 08:40 PM
 
9,381 posts, read 9,536,885 times
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Language, Democratic ideals, industrial Economy (the Post industrial), American Football, legal system, Our Literature, Pp Culture (American Idol, The Office, America's got Talent, X-Factor, etc.) are all British, Music (Queen, the Beatles, One Direction, Adele, ACDC, U2, Etc), Books (JK Rowling, Shakespeare, etc.)
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