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Old 06-01-2013, 10:11 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,993 posts, read 102,568,112 times
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The state where I live and where my children were born was once a part of Mexico, before that a part of Spain. The state where I was born is one of the original 13, but I am from a part that was not part of the original colony. The state where my husband is from was once a part of France. My family is of German ancestry, my DH's is of Scandinavian ancestry. Much of the US has little connection with Britain. We don't think of ourselves as "Brit Light".
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Old 06-01-2013, 10:19 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
1,221 posts, read 2,274,376 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Language, Democratic ideals, industrial Economy (the Post industrial), American Football, legal system, Our Literature, Pp Culture (American Idol, The Office, America's got Talent, X-Factor, etc.) are all British, Music (Queen, the Beatles, One Direction, Adele, ACDC, U2, Etc), Books (JK Rowling, Shakespeare, etc.)
Exactly. We're a lot more culturally British than people like to admit. I still maintain that the US is a British country. It's just hard to spot sometimes because it's so integrated.
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Old 06-02-2013, 05:51 AM
 
Location: Canada
124 posts, read 120,036 times
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Nowadays that statement seems like it should be the other way around. America seems to culturally influence every other country in the world. You see other countries taking on American music, entertainment, and clothing. I think in the beginning of American history, we we're very heavily influenced by Britain because it was considered the Mother Country for the pilgrims that settled in North America. Since the pilgrims and British influence pretty much founded the America we know today, we still feel alot of cultural ties with them. Not to mention we share the same language. In fact, our cultural ties with Britain is one of the reasons America entered WWI on the side of the Allies. The U.K. is kind of like the U.S.'s older sister because of our similarities, so its no surprise that these countries seem to exchange ideas throughout history.
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Old 06-02-2013, 06:04 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,237 posts, read 19,536,382 times
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The Bill of Rights in the United States Constitution was significantly influenced by the Magna Carta. The latter was written in England in 1215.

The great majority of U.S. presidents trace their ancestry to the British Isles.

The London Stock Exchange predates the New York Stock Exchange by 221 years - dating back to 1571.
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Old 06-02-2013, 07:48 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,993 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The Bill of Rights in the United States Constitution was significantly influenced by the Magna Carta. The latter was written in England in 1215.

The great majority of U.S. presidents trace their ancestry to the British Isles.

The London Stock Exchange predates the New York Stock Exchange by 221 years - dating back to 1571.
You know, that last is kind of funny. My daughter just returned from England, and she said the Brits said something similar about Oxford. Her response (which I agree with), "So What"?
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Old 06-02-2013, 11:33 AM
 
Location: San Diego
939 posts, read 2,829,451 times
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When I traveled the United Kingdom, I felt like I was in another part of the United States, with backward roads, embellished buildings, and funny accents, so there you have it. I miss London.
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Old 06-02-2013, 11:42 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
1,221 posts, read 2,274,376 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthCali4LifeSD View Post
When I traveled the United Kingdom, I felt like I was in another part of the United States, with backward roads, embellished buildings, and funny accents, so there you have it. I miss London.
I noticed that too when I studied abroad in London. It didn't feel so much like a foreign country as just a really weird part of the US. There was very little culture shock at all.
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Old 06-03-2013, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,333 posts, read 10,303,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn10am View Post
Exactly. We're a lot more culturally British than people like to admit. I still maintain that the US is a British country. It's just hard to spot sometimes because it's so integrated.

I'm curious why the part of the US with the largest amount of people with British ancestry (and surnames), the US South, is so culturally different from the UK.

I'm mostly talking about political beliefs, religious beliefs, guns, etc.
The overall general outlook of the people couldn't be further apart.

I think British people are much more similar to other Europeans, Canadians and Australians than they ever would be to most Americans.

Travelling in both areas I saw only place name connections, and ethnicity, but no cultural connections whatsoever.
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:45 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,131 posts, read 9,903,738 times
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Default Magna Carta

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The Bill of Rights in the United States Constitution was significantly influenced by the Magna Carta. The latter was written in England in 1215.

The great majority of U.S. presidents trace their ancestry to the British Isles.

The London Stock Exchange predates the New York Stock Exchange by 221 years - dating back to 1571.
Absolutely correct. Things we now take for granted like Due Process and Grand Juries come from Magna Carta. Also, a large part of our legal system is based on Common law (English Common Law). Take a look at the map on the Wikipedia site for Common Law. Common Law countries are basically the English speaking countries including Great Britain, the United States (except Louisiana), Canada (except Quebec), Australia and other former British colonies.

Common law - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There is a rare copy of the 1297 Magna Carta on display in the United States and another in Australia. What is interesting is not only do these two countries and others trace their Constitutions back to Magna Carta but 700+ years ago, the English signers had no idea that the continents of North America and Australia even existed! Can you imagine if they could somehow see today what they had started?
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:49 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I'm curious why the part of the US with the largest amount of people with British ancestry (and surnames), the US South, is so culturally different from the UK.

I'm mostly talking about political beliefs, religious beliefs, guns, etc.
The overall general outlook of the people couldn't be further apart.
People lost roots quickly in the New World, the south was rather isolated and communication difficult with elsewhere except maybe the coast (in the 18th and early 19th centuries). Plantation agriculture and its extreme ruralness quickly created a new culture. Northern New England may be as British or more so than the US South, hard to judge, though obviously must be since the South has a large non-white population and northern New England doesn't.

Aside government structure, IMO Canada feels much more like the US (especially the northern US) rather than the UK.
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