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Old 06-09-2013, 02:55 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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We have convinced ourselves that we don't have much British influence because we did after all fight them for our independence. The truth is however that we speak English, copied much of their government and law and share a common culture. Australia and Canada do not have an opposition to all things British as part of their national identity so it is more in the open in those nations. Here in the US the influence exists too, we just don't like to talk about it. All the Anglo saxon world shares a great deal of culture. History has divided us into the national goverments that exist today, but we easily could have stayed united under Britain (American defeat in revolution) or the Anglo saxon nations could have further divided. The US and Canada could have been united (war of 1812) or the US could have developed as two nations (US civil war), or we could have been broken down even further. (north divided in two after loss in civil war) California and the west coast could have made a go of independence as well if the north lost the war. Northern victory in the war was never guaranteed even if they did have the advantage. These consequences of a northern loss were always possible. History could have unfolded in many different ways creating many different possible nation states. No matter how history divided us we would have still shared a great deal of culture because of our common parent nation. Denying our British heritage and influence is like denying the sky is blue.
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Old 06-09-2013, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,851 posts, read 5,588,387 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
People lost roots quickly in the New World, the south was rather isolated and communication difficult with elsewhere except maybe the coast (in the 18th and early 19th centuries). Plantation agriculture and its extreme ruralness quickly created a new culture. Northern New England may be as British or more so than the US South, hard to judge, though obviously must be since the South has a large non-white population and northern New England doesn't.

Aside government structure, IMO Canada feels much more like the US (especially the northern US) rather than the UK.
You'd be surprised actually how the South in many ways is more tied to Britain than the rest of the U.S. Obviously the South is more politically and religiously conservative but when you look beyond that there are definite strong British influences in the South. Perhaps stronger than other regions. For instance a lot of the terminology used in Southern speak turns out to be common speech still used in Britain but lost in the U.S. outside of the South. An example is the term "I reckon". It's still used often in both the South and in Britain but not used much in the rest of the States. There are several more examples I wish I could remember that were pointed out by members on a British vs. American forum I used to belong to years ago but it no longer exist. I will have to do some research and pull them up. In a lot of ways the South has held on to it's old British vocabulary longer than the rest of the U.S..

Another stronger similarity between Britain and the South is ethnicity. You obviously have the greatest concentration of African Americans in the South which distinguishes it from Britain in that regards but the white population of the South is actually more akin to Britain than other parts of the U.S.. Most white southerners are of Irish, Scottish and English descent. When you get into the Northern States the majority of whites in many parts are actually more German or Polish, Greek or other Eastern European descendants or sometimes Italian or Scandinavian. There are much much fewer of any of these in the South.

Religiously, The South is mostly protestant like Britain. Where as in the rest of the U.S. the largest denomination is Catholicism.

Also, it's a historical fact that during the Revolutionary War far more Southerners remained loyal to Britain than Northerners. That probably had an influence on the way the South developed and hung on to more of it's old British vocabulary than the rest of the U.S. as well.
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Old 06-09-2013, 06:05 AM
 
Location: Texas
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Originally Posted by SouthCali4LifeSD View Post
When I traveled the United Kingdom, I felt like I was in another part of the United States, with backward roads, embellished buildings, and funny accents, so there you have it. I miss London.
UK should be admitted to the Union.
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Old 06-10-2013, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Originally Posted by Galounger View Post
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Religiously, The South is mostly protestant like Britain. Where as in the rest of the U.S. the largest denomination is Catholicism.
I spent some time living in England, and English people (who are members of the Church of England anyway) do not see themselves as Protestant. They see the Anglican Church as a sort of "third way" between Catholicism and Protestantism, as can be clear when you hear the disparaging remarks many will make about the "Protestants" in Northern Ireland.

The Scots (being mostly Presbyterian) and the Welsh (dominantly Methodist) are another matter.

Last edited by eschaton; 06-10-2013 at 07:09 AM..
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Old 06-10-2013, 06:45 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Yes, Evangelicalism common in the south is very different from the Anglican Church.
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Old 06-10-2013, 07:12 AM
 
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To those discussing the role of Christianity in the UK, don't waste your time. Christianity is dying in the UK, there are more practicing Muslims.

To answer the overall question, the US were influenced in language, legal system, place names, music and literature for starters. I would say that's a fairly strong influence.
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Old 06-10-2013, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Mind explaining how legislators in NC, sworn to uphold the US Constitution, crafted a bill in their state house to make Christianity the state religion (in violation of the incorporation of The Bill of Rights), and to claim that NC was exempted from Fed laws. The people of the South eat this crap up and believe it. I'm tired of sharing a govt with them.
The South tried to form its own country but the north didn't let them.
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Old 06-10-2013, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,789 posts, read 9,419,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
People lost roots quickly in the New World, the south was rather isolated and communication difficult with elsewhere except maybe the coast (in the 18th and early 19th centuries). Plantation agriculture and its extreme ruralness quickly created a new culture. Northern New England may be as British or more so than the US South, hard to judge, though obviously must be since the South has a large non-white population and northern New England doesn't.

Aside government structure, IMO Canada feels much more like the US (especially the northern US) rather than the UK.
Some aspects of Southern culture are very similar to parts of the UK. The Scots that settled in the mountains of NC/SC/KY/WV/TN moonshined just like they did in Scotland. Instead of Scotch we have whiskey (same thing really).

The aristocratic nature of the south is very similar to the feudal system common in England with Kings/Queens/Lords, etc...

The South prefers tea over coffee (iced tea). It was iced instead of hot because of the hot weather, but tea was always preferred in the south.

However, with a large percentage of slaves bringing their own culture, and a great part of the South settled by Spanish (TX/FL) or the French (LA/SE TX/S MS/S AL/MO), the English culture pretty much got whittled down where moonshining and tea are the only remnants.

The whole of the Southwest (Spanish), mid South and Midwest (French territory), as well as the Gulf coastal states and South Florida have nothing to do with the UK.

Think about cities like New Orleans, St. Louis, Detroit, and Des Moines. The name origins of these cities is French.

Once you leaves the Eastern seaboard the British influence is nill until the Pacific Northwest.


I grew up in Louisiana and its legal system is still based on Napoleonic code, we have parishes instead of counties, and the population is overwhelmingly Catholic. We eat dishes that are French in origin, not English. New Orleans has nothing in common with London.

Last edited by cBach; 06-10-2013 at 07:38 AM..
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Old 06-10-2013, 07:51 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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A lot of traditional Appalachia music sounds very similar to Celtic music. In fact, once in a while it's possible to confuse the two. And then there's Cape Breton (Nova Scotia) music:


Natalie MacMaster - Volcanic *** - YouTube

culturally, Nova Scotia seems closest to northern New England than anywhere else.
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Old 06-10-2013, 08:24 AM
 
17 posts, read 34,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
A lot of traditional Appalachia music sounds very similar to Celtic music. In fact, once in a while it's possible to confuse the two. And then there's Cape Breton (Nova Scotia) music:


Natalie MacMaster - Volcanic *** - YouTube

culturally, Nova Scotia seems closest to northern New England than anywhere else.

'Nova Scotia' means 'New Scotland', and you think it's closest to Northern England? Well done.
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