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Old 05-07-2015, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,374 posts, read 1,193,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
I think the states west of the Missouri river border (western Minnesota down to western Louisiana) are the beginning of the west.
Do you mean the Mississippi River? If that's the case, I definitely don't agree. There's too much broadleaf forest in the MIMAL states (Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana) and no need of irrigation to sustain farming for there to be any semblance of a Western feel.
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Old 05-07-2015, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Texas is just another one of the South's diverse states. You may think that TX has nothing in common with AL, but what does NC or VA have in common with AL? Not much...all the states of each region have their own identity, and just because one is a bit different doesn't remove it from it's region. No one said that Texas has to be quintessentially southern to be part of the South.
Alabama and North Carolina are far more alike in terms of geography and even in culture than Texas to either of them. How can you say Texas is NOT western? The south is a region known for lots of trees, for swamps, for the misty mountains of Appalachia. Only eastern Texas near Arkansas and Louisiana fit that description. The west is known for it's dusty plains and grasslands, for it's rugged mountains and scenic deserts. Texas has a lot more of those western characteristics than it has southeastern characteristics. It is a huge state so of course it won't be geographically homogenous but overall, it's definitely the west.

Texas is also culturally western. Here is more of the ranch culture, where out east in Alabama, Georgia, etc. it's more the farm and plantation. There's a huge Mexican influence here, unlike in the southeast. You can't tell me it's not western, when it freaking borders Mexico! The only other states bordering Mexico are New Mexico, Arizona and California. Western states

Call it southern if you want, I do sometimes (like in my little status thing) but overall, it's southwestern as well.
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Old 05-07-2015, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,377,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
Do you mean the Mississippi River? If that's the case, I definitely don't agree. There's too much broadleaf forest in the MIMAL states (Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana) and no need of irrigation to sustain farming for there to be any semblance of a Western feel.
No, not the Mississippi, the Missouri river. It's the river that forms the border of Iowa/Nebraska and Missouri/Kansas. This means Kansas is western and Missouri is not.
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Old 05-07-2015, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,374 posts, read 1,193,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
No, not the Mississippi, the Missouri river. It's the river that forms the border of Iowa/Nebraska and Missouri/Kansas. This means Kansas is western and Missouri is not.
Well, you had mentioned Western Minnesota and Western Louisiana which don't even touch the Missouri River and aren't even close, so thought maybe that's what you had meant.
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Old 05-08-2015, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
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Well, everyone has their own feeling about "where the west begins" and it's all relative, to some degree. For folks in the 1700's, it was the Cumberland Gap. Later on it was St. Louis and then Independence, MO. For me growing up in FL, it was everywhere west of us on a family road trip.

Nowadays, I'd probably say that the 100th Meridian is a good line of demarcation between "East" and "West" - and US Highway 83 follows it pretty closely. It goes from Laredo, TX through Amarillo up to North Platte, NE to Minot, ND and up to the Canadian border. To the west, the average rainfall is less than 20 inches per year and has a significantly more arid feel to it, as well as a generally higher elevation.

Here's a link to a image showing the 100th Meridian: https://richardnilsendotcom1.files.w...ridian-map.jpg and a link showing the route of US83: http://www.roadtripusa.com/routes/ro...tonowhere.html. It looks (and feels) like a good dividing line to me....
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Old 05-08-2015, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,310,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
Well, you had mentioned Western Minnesota and Western Louisiana which don't even touch the Missouri River and aren't even close, so thought maybe that's what you had meant.
Perhaps he means the Sioux/Red River then, and his boundary is I-29/35, essentially, which I'd definitely agree with.
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Old 05-08-2015, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,374 posts, read 1,193,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Perhaps he means the Sioux/Red River then, and his boundary is I-29/35, essentially, which I'd definitely agree with.
I'd agree with that. It's actually pretty surprising how quickly the landscape changes once you get west of I-29, especially in North Dakota. The Red River Valley really does create a cut-and-dry border between Midwestern landscapes (Minnesota) and the start of the wide-open rolling prairie where you see nothing but wheat and canola.
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Old 04-10-2016, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Orcutt, CA (Santa Maria Valley)
3,314 posts, read 1,498,357 times
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Wisconsin!

Just Kidding, I think the west starts at the 100 longitude west but the core of the west begans at the Rocky Mountains.
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Old 04-10-2016, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,099 posts, read 1,123,177 times
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Once Ranching Culture supplants farming, you're in the west.
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Old 04-10-2016, 04:44 PM
 
Location: The Dirty South.
1,573 posts, read 1,427,743 times
Reputation: 1097
Trans Pecos region of Texas. Or far west Texas.
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