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Old 06-05-2013, 10:41 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
The overwhelming majority of Americans (and likely foreigners as well) would identify Kansas and Nebraska as unequivocally midwestern. Most would likely lump North and South Dakota in as well. Like it or not, the upper plains states are now (and always have been) as much a part of the cultural definition of the midwest as the Great Lakes or the Ohio Valley.

This is what is usually considered "midwest" by almost everyone on Earth who isn't from Ohio or Michigan:



To chime in on the original question, the 100th meridian is as good a line in the sand as any, but there's no doubt that Salina, KS is culturally more like Terre Haute than it is like Medford, OR.
Well by this measure, the West starts at the edge of the Rockies (Denver/Albuquerque/Billings). Limon, CO has more in common with Salina, Kansas than Durango, CO.
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Old 06-05-2013, 04:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
Well by this measure, the West starts at the edge of the Rockies (Denver/Albuquerque/Billings). Limon, CO has more in common with Salina, Kansas than Durango, CO.
You got a point.
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Old 06-05-2013, 04:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
Well by this measure, the West starts at the edge of the Rockies (Denver/Albuquerque/Billings). Limon, CO has more in common with Salina, Kansas than Durango, CO.
What about in New Mexico? I always heard that towns in Eastern New Mexico almost felt "southern"(or at least like an offshoot of Texas). Where does it start feeling "western" or does it all feel like the "West"? I've never made it east of Las Vegas, NM...
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Old 06-05-2013, 04:36 PM
 
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geographically speaking and topographically speaking, it begins on I-35 in the cities of Austin and San Antonio.
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Old 06-05-2013, 06:24 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
What about in New Mexico? I always heard that towns in Eastern New Mexico almost felt "southern"(or at least like an offshoot of Texas). Where does it start feeling "western" or does it all feel like the "West"? I've never made it east of Las Vegas, NM...
I can't really say from experience as I've been as far east as Santa Rosa in this state and that looks and feels New Mexican though it's on the prairie. From what I've been told and places like Clovis, Portales, and Hobbs may as well be Texas so perhaps they are a bit Southern in their ways. NM has problems all over the state but places like Hobbs and Roswell are often the butt of jokes around here. It's just arid prairie over in those parts, and the energy (gas) industry is big around there. Santa Fe and Hobbs are worlds apart culturally. I've never really had much reason to head East of here in this state.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 06-05-2013 at 07:00 PM..
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Old 06-05-2013, 09:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
What about in New Mexico? I always heard that towns in Eastern New Mexico almost felt "southern"(or at least like an offshoot of Texas). Where does it start feeling "western" or does it all feel like the "West"? I've never made it east of Las Vegas, NM...
There is a good point to be made here. Not so sure if it is so true anymore, but at least up until a couple of decades ago, there was a small slice of eastern New Mexico that was actually referred to as "Little Texas". Reason being, the accents, prevalence of Southern Baptist churches, etc. It was about the western most extension of Southern culture at all.

Here is a map (top one) of the extent of what is known as "Southern American English", which sorta shows this. On a related tangent (IMHO) it is not a bad map of the South itself, in many ways.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_American_English
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Old 06-07-2013, 01:27 AM
 
Location: 'Bout a mile off Old Mill Road
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Fort Worth, TX.
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Old 06-07-2013, 05:20 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
Well by this measure, the West starts at the edge of the Rockies (Denver/Albuquerque/Billings). Limon, CO has more in common with Salina, Kansas than Durango, CO.
Once again, the plains region really doesn't fit with the east or the west by traditional definitions but in my opinion beef cattle, wheat and oil fit a western paradigm more than an eastern one.

As far as New Mexico the "little Texas" designation still fits as those towns may as well be in west Texas. Much like my criticism of the 100th parallel being used to designate "the west", there is absolutely nothing that demarcates the transition between west Texas and Eastern New Mexico other than the border signs.
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Old 06-07-2013, 09:47 AM
 
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The border between the semi-arid steppe climate zone (shown in yellowish brown) and the humid subtropical (green) / humid continental climate zone (blue) seems to be as good of a border between east and west as any. Granted, it's a little further west than the 100th meridan, but since it's based on climate zones, it makes the most sense to me.

As you can see, it basically splits the Dakotas, Nebraska, and Kansas in half, while splitting up Texas and Oklahoma in such a way that most of those two states is east of the line, but the parts that are truly in arid or semi-arid climates are definitely west of it. What do you all think?

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Old 06-07-2013, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
For the same reason why western Asia is called the Middle East...

When the "Midwest" was named that was in basically the middle of the western frontier to Northeasterners...long before we settled the US from coast to coast and actually settled the true west.
That was kind of my point in saying that "Ohio" was where the West started. I don't think that was clear.

The reason I said that is because years ago I read a pretty good article someone wrote after searching for a particular type of American town. I don't remember all of the article, but one of the criteria on which the selection of the town was based was that it had to have once been part of the American frontier. The town chosen was in Ohio. I see you know what I'm talking about!

My "why isn't there a Mideast?" question was just me being silly.
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