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Old 06-07-2013, 07:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AQUEMINI331 View Post
I remember in grade school learning about some sort of climate line that separated arid climates from humid ones. Everything east was a humid climate, everything west of it was dry. The map someone showed earlier of the 100th meridian seems similar, but I don't remember it being a hard and fast line like 100 W longitude or whatever. What I seem to remember was a squiggly line. Anyone know what I'm talking about?
If that's true I suppose western Oregon and Washington, not to mention the northern Rockies and much of northern California and Arizona, are not really the west.
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Old 06-07-2013, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Austin
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In Texas anything west of IH 35 I consider "west". Austin & San Antonio I call it a spilt.
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Old 06-07-2013, 08:59 PM
 
Location: So California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
If that's true I suppose western Oregon and Washington, not to mention the northern Rockies and much of northern California and Arizona, are not really the west.
That's silly. He's referring to the 100th meridian that's already been discussed,roughly west Texas onward. Climate changes from humid to dry air.
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Old 06-07-2013, 09:15 PM
 
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Default Where does the West start?

West of the Mississippi River.
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Old 06-08-2013, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
It's a major college town and college towns are weird, so it has this quirkiness to it. What are the suburbs like, though?
Round Rock is "western".
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Old 06-08-2013, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoninATX View Post
In Texas anything west of IH 35 I consider "west". Austin & San Antonio I call it a spilt.
Victoria & Beeville would disagree.
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Old 06-08-2013, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Texas State Fair
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Default Where does the West start?

Quote:
Originally Posted by hipcat View Post
Where does the Midwest and South change into the West?
Just west of Duncanville, Tx. From I-20 looking west you can see the rest of the country spread out before you.
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Old 06-08-2013, 04:41 PM
 
537 posts, read 1,711,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
If that's true I suppose western Oregon and Washington, not to mention the northern Rockies and much of northern California and Arizona, are not really the west.

Though the Pacific NW is known for having a wet climate, a) it actually gets a lot less precip per year than most cities east of the Great Plains, and b) summers there usually aren't humid at all, especially compared to any place back east. So even though it's a cool, wet climate, in some ways it actually is "dry" compared to the eastern states. If that makes sense.
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Old 06-08-2013, 05:51 PM
 
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The east gets more "rain" while the PNW gets more "rainy days".
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Old 06-08-2013, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,789 posts, read 9,419,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steel03 View Post
how about


Basically follows the Missouri through the Dakotas, then veers west to Kearney, and stays west of the major cities until San Antionio.
Why do you put Austin in the South but San Antonio in the West?
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