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Old 05-30-2013, 05:20 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
138 posts, read 196,943 times
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Is their is an American city that has not changed much in population in recent years but is about to have a massive surge in population.

Are their any cities that will double in the next 40 years?
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Old 05-30-2013, 05:28 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
1,356 posts, read 2,295,910 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JasR30 View Post
Is their is an American city that has not changed much in population in recent years but is about to have a massive surge in population.

Are their any cities that will double in the next 40 years?
The usual. Austin, Charlotte, Raleigh, ect, ect, ect.
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Old 05-30-2013, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Limbo
6,475 posts, read 6,186,999 times
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Depends what you consider massive. Minneapolis hasn't changed much over the last few Census', but is likely to see a 20k+ increase between 2010-2020. Most core cities not located in the south have the potential for some substantial growth this decade.
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Old 05-30-2013, 07:50 AM
 
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Does size matter, because there may be smaller cities currently that may grow steadily during that time period.
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Old 05-30-2013, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,318,361 times
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I figured the OP meant metro population.

Minneapolis has likely already grown by 20K in my opinion (or if not yet, it will by the end of 2013), but I don't see the metro population exploding beyond its usual 10%-15% decennial growth rates. I see Seattle doing this, and it already has begun. Denver as well has taken its growth to a whole new level. I could see San Diego blossom at some point as that city does not grow nearly as fast as I'd expect a "pefect" weather city on the coast to grow. I could see some Sun Belt cities that haven't taken off yet take off, such as Birmingham or New Orleans. The Northeastern cities that I could see boom again could be Philly or Boston. In the Midwest, I'd pick Minneapolis over the others, but I really have a hard time believing that people will suddenly stop letting cold weather deter them from living in a great city, and that's not going to change for quite some time....if ever (the weather).

I can see some smaller metros really boom, like metros in the Dakotas, Texas, and any smaller metro with great universities, like Ann Arbor, Madison or Eugene.
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Old 05-30-2013, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Milky Way Galaxy
669 posts, read 726,029 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
I figured the OP meant metro population.

Minneapolis has likely already grown by 20K in my opinion (or if not yet, it will by the end of 2013), but I don't see the metro population exploding beyond its usual 10%-15% decennial growth rates. I see Seattle doing this, and it already has begun. Denver as well has taken its growth to a whole new level. I could see San Diego blossom at some point as that city does not grow nearly as fast as I'd expect a "pefect" weather city on the coast to grow. I could see some Sun Belt cities that haven't taken off yet take off, such as Birmingham or New Orleans. The Northeastern cities that I could see boom again could be Philly or Boston. In the Midwest, I'd pick Minneapolis over the others, but I really have a hard time believing that people will suddenly stop letting cold weather deter them from living in a great city, and that's not going to change for quite some time....if ever (the weather).

I can see some smaller metros really boom, like metros in the Dakotas, Texas, and any smaller metro with great universities, like Ann Arbor, Madison or Eugene.
People need to really stop talking as if that matters to majority of the people in the country. I have lived in Florida since I was 3 years old and have never been less than an hour away from the beach. And honestly some people here just hate the heat especially in the summer and that includes native Floridians as well. And a lot of people also hate not being able to see snow which majority of Americans do. So no weather has got nothing to do with majority opinion. Being near the coast on the other hand is a different matter. Some people really like beaches. But that doesn't mean they all like the heat. A lot of people especially north tend to actually use it to escape the heat or they just like the view.

Last edited by yyuusr; 05-30-2013 at 09:07 AM..
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Old 05-30-2013, 09:07 AM
 
56,618 posts, read 80,930,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
I figured the OP meant metro population.

Minneapolis has likely already grown by 20K in my opinion (or if not yet, it will by the end of 2013), but I don't see the metro population exploding beyond its usual 10%-15% decennial growth rates. I see Seattle doing this, and it already has begun. Denver as well has taken its growth to a whole new level. I could see San Diego blossom at some point as that city does not grow nearly as fast as I'd expect a "pefect" weather city on the coast to grow. I could see some Sun Belt cities that haven't taken off yet take off, such as Birmingham or New Orleans. The Northeastern cities that I could see boom again could be Philly or Boston. In the Midwest, I'd pick Minneapolis over the others, but I really have a hard time believing that people will suddenly stop letting cold weather deter them from living in a great city, and that's not going to change for quite some time....if ever (the weather).

I can see some smaller metros really boom, like metros in the Dakotas, Texas, and any smaller metro with great universities, like Ann Arbor, Madison or Eugene.
This is what I was thinking about, as I'm seeing/hearing about a lot of construction in Ithaca NY, which is another smaller college town.
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Old 05-30-2013, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Saint Louis
189 posts, read 306,286 times
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I think St. Louis is most certainly going to have major population gains at some point in the next few decades. Contrary to popular belief, the metro area has never lost population and has been slowly but steadily growing for a long time. The population loss was mostly people moving from the city to the county.

There has been remarkable growth within city boundaries in the last few years though and downtown has doubled in population since 2000. More and more top graduates from our universities are staying for jobs in town and more companies are moving into town including Boeing shifting lots of jobs from Seattle, tech incubator Cambridge Innovation Center opening their first major office outside of Boston in St. Louis, and rumors of a major Google office to be announced in the next few months.

St. Louis is a place that has for various reasons been a sleeping giant for a long time. St Louis would essentially be the size of Chicago today had it not been for the fact that difficulties and delays in construction of the first Mississippi river railroad bridge at St. Louis (it was instead built in Iowa first) allowed the pathing of the first transcontinental railroad to be diverted through Chicago rather than pass through St. Louis, which gave Chicago the giant boost it needed to win the attention, population, finance, and influence wars of the midwest.
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Old 05-30-2013, 09:47 AM
 
27 posts, read 45,445 times
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Even though I'm slightly biased Cincinnati has been growing steadily over the last 5 years. Lot's of people who in the 80's moved to the outskirts of town to places like Mason are starting to move back towards Downtown. With the revival of Historic Neighborhoods like Over-The-Rhine and new developments like The Banks project down by the Ohio River it seems like Cincinnati is building and building.

Add that on top of a proposed Street Car (Though funding seems to still be an issue) and the securing of the MLB All-Star game in 2015, Cincinnati looks like it's heading upwards over the next 5 years.
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Old 05-30-2013, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Limbo
6,475 posts, read 6,186,999 times
Reputation: 6239
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
I figured the OP meant metro population.

Minneapolis has likely already grown by 20K in my opinion (or if not yet, it will by the end of 2013), but I don't see the metro population exploding beyond its usual 10%-15% decennial growth rates. I see Seattle doing this, and it already has begun. Denver as well has taken its growth to a whole new level. I could see San Diego blossom at some point as that city does not grow nearly as fast as I'd expect a "pefect" weather city on the coast to grow. I could see some Sun Belt cities that haven't taken off yet take off, such as Birmingham or New Orleans. The Northeastern cities that I could see boom again could be Philly or Boston. In the Midwest, I'd pick Minneapolis over the others, but I really have a hard time believing that people will suddenly stop letting cold weather deter them from living in a great city, and that's not going to change for quite some time....if ever (the weather).

I can see some smaller metros really boom, like metros in the Dakotas, Texas, and any smaller metro with great universities, like Ann Arbor, Madison or Eugene.
I agree. I don't see the metro growing as fast as it did the last decade. That is fine with me, though. Slow and steady growth is definitely better than the boom/bust cycle that plagues some places. I do think that Minneapolis, Seattle, Denver, and Austin, are new go-to places this decade. This is on top of the overwhelming growth Texas already sees.
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