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Old 01-13-2018, 08:12 AM
 
4 posts, read 2,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
Back when I worked at Denny's, I had a coworker from Danville around my age who had the NCVS in full flair. He'd moved up to the Chicago area recently, so either it's started to spread down pretty far or he's a great mimic.
Lots of groups "mimic" either consciously or subconsciously lol...ever hear and listen closely to a real white guy from Chicago moving to the black south, and all of a sudden he begins to sounds like a wigga - moreso with white females LOL
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Old 01-13-2018, 12:07 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,845,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1DooWopper View Post
Lots of groups "mimic" either consciously or subconsciously lol...ever hear and listen closely to a real white guy from Chicago moving to the black south, and all of a sudden he begins to sounds like a wigga - moreso with white females LOL
It is true. I have done it myself a few times living in the South. Being I am so conscious of language it doesn't affect me the way it would affect others. Enunciating things properly made it so that certain aspects of Chicago's accent I will purposely NOT say because they sound incorrect to my ears. BUT when I am unaware of the changes it would affect me more. Sometimes it just happens when you get used to hearing certain pronunciations. It just becomes standard.

But Danville people don't have NCVS much if at all. Springfield maybe more so but not to Chicago degrees.
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Old 01-13-2018, 06:37 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,584,119 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I think NYC is ethnolect central. Black NYC accent, Latino NYC accent, Yiddish influenced NYC, and finally standard NYC which is de facto choice of everyone else. I don't think Chicago has gotten there yet nor do I see it as necessarily in the future.

If anything NCVS could be considered an American specific ethnolect mostly used by those of Irish background and those who live around them.
The Latino accents vary a lot actually, I wouldn't say there's just one for NYC
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Old 01-18-2018, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,546 posts, read 710,668 times
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Sitting in a Starbucks in Forest Park right now next to a guy who's maybe late 20s/early 30s, ostensibly Indian-American, and has a very strong Chicago accent. Thought of this thread.
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Old 01-19-2018, 03:51 AM
 
Location: Kent, UK/ Rhode Island, US
626 posts, read 575,577 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I think NYC is ethnolect central. Black NYC accent, Latino NYC accent, Yiddish influenced NYC, and finally standard NYC which is de facto choice of everyone else. I don't think Chicago has gotten there yet nor do I see it as necessarily in the future.

If anything NCVS could be considered an American specific ethnolect mostly used by those of Irish background and those who live around them.
What accent is Cardi B supposed to have? I thought she was exaggerating some sort of accent, but people were saying that its common for girls to speak like that in the Bronx?
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Old 01-19-2018, 04:03 AM
 
Location: Kent, UK/ Rhode Island, US
626 posts, read 575,577 times
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Originally Posted by BMI View Post
You’re right. I was just watching Home alone the other night and I noticed canadian actor John Candy
(from Toronto) put on a Chicago NCVS accent, Catherine O’Hara, who played the mom, also from Toronto,
didn’t bother to, she said did say the sorry the american way early in the movie, “sarry” , then later in the movie said sorry the canadian way, “sorey”. Jim Carrey made same slip up in the movie “The Truman Show”.
When I find out a actor is Canadian, I notice they all make that mistake. It's how I remember the actor is Canadian. I remember in 40 year old virgin I caught Seth Rogen doing it when speaking rapidly. In back 2 the future 2(or 1?), Michael J Fox does it when saying "I felt Sorey for the guy" when referring to his young dad.
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Old 01-19-2018, 05:10 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,584,119 times
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Originally Posted by A.J240 View Post
What accent is Cardi B supposed to have? I thought she was exaggerating some sort of accent, but people were saying that its common for girls to speak like that in the Bronx?
Cardi B speaks with an exaggerated Nuyodominican/Nuyorican accent. In her case it's basically AAVE with a Latin flair.

I honestly don't think people from The Bronx sound like Cardi B. Here's what everyday people in The Bronx sound like:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8Nbl4MAcQg.
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Old 01-19-2018, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Kent, UK/ Rhode Island, US
626 posts, read 575,577 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Cardi B speaks with an exaggerated Nuyodominican/Nuyorican accent. In her case it's basically AAVE with a Latin flair.

I honestly don't think people from The Bronx sound like Cardi B. Here's what everyday people in The Bronx sound like:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8Nbl4MAcQg.
Ah, right. Thanks.
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Old 01-19-2018, 10:34 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,845,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Cardi B speaks with an exaggerated Nuyodominican/Nuyorican accent. In her case it's basically AAVE with a Latin flair.

I honestly don't think people from The Bronx sound like Cardi B. Here's what everyday people in The Bronx sound like:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8Nbl4MAcQg.
Cosign this. That accent is found in a lot of hip hop artists from NYC though considering the strong Black/Latino influence in hip hop culture. Sometimes Blacks with no Latino background still utilize a few loanwords, phrases, or even pronunciations. Not hard to believe considering how dense the city is and how Blacks and Latinos many times inhabit the same areas.
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Old 01-26-2018, 04:44 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,584,119 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Cosign this. That accent is found in a lot of hip hop artists from NYC though considering the strong Black/Latino influence in hip hop culture. Sometimes Blacks with no Latino background still utilize a few loanwords, phrases, or even pronunciations. Not hard to believe considering how dense the city is and how Blacks and Latinos many times inhabit the same areas.
I think the black influence on Latino speech is much, much stronger than the reverse. That being said, after watching some more of those videos, I would say that a lot of the Puerto Rican and Dominican looking people in them don't really sound black. But I do know a lot of Puerto Ricans and Dominicans who sound black, or they'll use a lot of AAVE while having a different timbre to their accent.

And then there are the other Latino accents you would hear.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4wFW4WpMxk&t=76s

The girl around the 1 minute mark, I'm guessing she's either Mexican-American or Ecuadorian-American. She speaks with a standard English grammar structure, but with a significant Latina flair to her voice. This kind of thing seems common for people born to immigrant parents in the US, not just Latinos but anyone with parents who speak to them primarily in a language other than English. I bet she sounds more similar to a Chicana in LA than the average white or black person from say, Brooklyn.

And I also know plenty of Latinos who either sound totally white or almost sound white but have the slightest Latin flair to their accent. Like a watered down version of the aforementioned girl from the video.
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