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Old 06-01-2013, 01:19 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
^^^ Houston is drifting left over the last few election cycles but by most measures the city would not be considered "liberal." I see the city as pretty much split down the middle and the metro clearly leans right. Obama carried Harris County by less than 1000 votes and even Ted Cruz scored a victory in the county by neary 20,000 votes. The rest of the counties in the metro were easily carried by Romney (The great divide: President Obama carries top 4 Texas cities and st... - CultureMap Houston). Certain neighborhoods in Houston might be a liberal island in a red state, but not the city as a whole.
Well, "the city as a whole" has unusually large physical boundaries and contains countless stretches of population that would be the suburbs in most other places. Carve the city proper down to only the inner loop, and your post becomes invalid.
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Old 06-01-2013, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
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Don't think I am racist for saying this, but the true litmus test of a liberal city is what percentage of the WHITE population votes Democrat. Minorities, be it black, latino, etc vote Democrat for their own reasons but many times align more with the GOP on social/religious issues. White Democrats however will most of the time be pro-gay and pro-choice and more inclined to be involved in the cultural activities that define liberal cities.
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Old 06-01-2013, 01:56 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeyondInfinity View Post
All of the major cities in GA are Democratic (Atlanta, Augusta, Savannah, Columbus and Macon). The rest of the state is Red, but with Atlanta growing so large and quickly, I believe GA will be a blue state in the next five years.
I disagree. The affluent northern suburbs of Atlanta are actually quite conservative. The 11th Congressional District, that covers this area is rated the second most conservative district in the country behind Orange County, CA.
Rapid growth of this area has not resulted in a dilution of the political bent of their voter base. Considering that this makes up a large part of the state, I don't any big political turnaround anytime soon.
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Old 06-01-2013, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,852 posts, read 7,799,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
Well, "the city as a whole" has unusually large physical boundaries and contains countless stretches of population that would be the suburbs in most other places. Carve the city proper down to only the inner loop, and your post becomes invalid.
Living in the inner loop for over two decades, I know Houston well. Hence my statement that "Certain neighborhoods in Houston might be a liberal island in a red state, but not the city as a whole." The city of Houston stretches across its entire 600 square miles: the good, the bad and the ugly (or the liberal, conservative and libertarian). My post about the politics of the collective city is valid. If you want to carve Houston down in some attempt to make it seem a liberal city for the purposes of this thread, then stop claiming bragging rights that it's the 4th most populated city in so many others. You can't have it both ways.
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Old 06-01-2013, 02:23 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
Living in the inner loop for over two decades, I know Houston well. Hence my statement that "Certain neighborhoods in Houston might be a liberal island in a red state, but not the city as a whole." The city of Houston stretches across its entire 600 square miles: the good, the bad and the ugly (or the liberal, conservative and libertarian). My post about the politics of the collective city is valid. If you want to carve Houston down in some attempt to make it seem a liberal city for the purposes of this thread, then stop claiming bragging rights that it's the 4th most populated city in so many others. You can't have it both ways.
Not that I remember bragging about it being the fourth largest city, but sure I can. Man made city lines have little to no bearing on social barriers.

Inner Loop Houston would be comparable to Atlanta proper. No one crosses the city line into Druid Hills and says "I can tell I'm no longer in Atlanta". Now, if you're claiming that ITL isn't liberal, then you would be entitled to that opinion, but to suggest that Houston is as conservative as it is liberal by including Montrose and Kingwood in the same classification makes no sense whatsoever. For this discussion to be fair, Houston should be judged by the same standards of a typical American city, which is nowhere near as physically large as we are.
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Old 06-01-2013, 02:46 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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I've repeated this point time and time again, but it continues to amaze me how convinced people are of the conservatism of a city with a lesbian mayor with a multiracial family. I was sure that Annise Parker was no longer a secret.
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Old 06-01-2013, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Center City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
Inner Loop Houston would be comparable to Atlanta proper. No one crosses the city line into Druid Hills and says "I can tell I'm no longer in Atlanta". Now, if you're claiming that ITL isn't liberal, then you would be entitled to that opinion, but to suggest that Houston is as conservative as it is liberal by including Montrose and Kingwood in the same classification makes no sense whatsoever. For this discussion to be fair, Houston should be judged by the same standards of a typical American city, which is nowhere near as physically large as we are.
Houston occupies 600 square miles. Like every city, its citizens hold the full spectrum of political views. When taken as a whole, however, some cities skew left, some skew right. Overall, Houston's population is generally recognized as being politically in the middle:

"Houston is considered to be a politically divided city whose balance of power often sways between Republicans and Democrats. The affluent western-central portions of Houston—such as River Oaks and the Memorial/Spring Branch area, as well as master planned communities of Kingwood and Clear Lake City—consistently vote Republican, while many of the inner city areas, Neartown, and Alief—are heavily Democratic. According to the 2005 Houston Area Survey, 68 percent of non-Hispanic whites in Harris County are declared or favor Republicans while 89 percent of non-Hispanic blacks in the area are declared or favor Democrats. About 62 percent Hispanics (of any race) in the area are declared or favor Democrats."
Politics of Houston - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This feels pretty accurate to me after spending 26 years living, working, voting and paying taxes there. If you wish to keep arguing over this point with someone or something, however, here's your taker: All sizes | rock on.. | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
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Old 06-01-2013, 03:03 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,799,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
Houston occupies 600 square miles. Like every city, its citizens hold the full spectrum of political views. When taken as a whole, however, some cities skew left, some skew right. Overall, Houston's population is generally recognized as being politically in the middle:

"Houston is considered to be a politically divided city whose balance of power often sways between Republicans and Democrats. The affluent western-central portions of Houston—such as River Oaks and the Memorial/Spring Branch area, as well as master planned communities of Kingwood and Clear Lake City—consistently vote Republican, while many of the inner city areas, Neartown, and Alief—are heavily Democratic. According to the 2005 Houston Area Survey, 68 percent of non-Hispanic whites in Harris County are declared or favor Republicans while 89 percent of non-Hispanic blacks in the area are declared or favor Democrats. About 62 percent Hispanics (of any race) in the area are declared or favor Democrats."
Politics of Houston - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This feels pretty accurate to me after spending 26 years living, working, voting and paying taxes there. If you wish to keep arguing over this point with someone or something, however, here's your taker: All sizes | rock on.. | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
I think you're being a bit more argumentative than I. You tend to slap on the gloves anytime one of us lowly Houstonians dares to question your acumen.

Kingwood is nearly 30 miles from downtown Houston. It and other outlying incorporated areas would be independent suburbs in most other metros, so, for the purpose of this discussion, why not simply consider them such? That's all I'm really saying.
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Old 06-01-2013, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,163,980 times
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I agree with Nairobi, the city of Houston is more to the left that the right.

I don't consider Kingwood or the city limits near Katy to be city. Heck nothing outside the beltway.


Houston is blue, Dallas is blue, SA is blue, Austin has lost its marbles, McAllen is blue
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Old 06-01-2013, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,852 posts, read 7,799,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
Houston is blue, Dallas is blue, SA is blue, Austin has lost its marbles, McAllen is blue
Dallas County 2012 vote - Obama: 57%, Romney: 42%
Bexar County (SA) - Obama: 52%, Romney: 47%
Travis County (Austin) - Obama: 60%, Romney: 36%
Hildago County (McAllen) - Obama: 70%, Romney: 29%
and. . .
Harris County (Houston) - Obama: 49%, Romney: 49%
Texas Presidential Race - 2012 Election Center - Elections & Politics from CNN.com

BTW - Of the above, Harris is the only county that went for Ted Cruz.

Based on these data and in keeping with the theme of this thread, of the cities cited above, I see two cities that are clearly "liberal" (McAllen and Austin), two that trend blue (Dallas and SA) and one (Houston) that is purple. As always when looking at data and dealing with personal experience, YMMV.

I'm sure this doesn't convince those who feel Houston is decidedly "blue." That's not my point and I am fine if some hold those views. Mine simply differ and I won't repeat the rationale I've expressed earlier in this thread for the reasons I see Houston as politically split down the middle. As someone who follows politics closely (to the point of giving cash donations to two separate and successful mayoral candidates while in Houston), I just find the statistics support my experience of the city's politics, so thought I might share a few.

Last edited by Pine to Vine; 06-01-2013 at 04:57 PM..
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